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Dancers of Creation Against Urban Decay in the Photographic Fine Art of Thea Juliette Stevenson

sixty eight, photography by Thea Stevenson

sixty eight, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

“I am constantly looking for a heartbeat in the stillness of a photograph,” says photographic artist Thea Juliette Stevenson. In her series of works she calls Abandoned (the Alley Ways of Our Hidden Dreams), the artist gives us glimpses into what she calls “urban degradation” –images of stark little-traversed city pathways and human landscapes with an absence of humanity.

A Home Stood I, Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her Abandoned series

A Home Stood I, Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her Abandoned series

In a new set of imagery, she continues the themes of urban degradation, yet breathes life into the scenes with the introduction of dancers. This series she calls COMBUSTION.

JUMP, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her  COMBUSTION series

JUMP, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

According to the artist, the dancers symbolize creation against the urban destruction and stand as symbols for the continued rhythm of life.
Broken Remembered, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her Abandoned series

Broken Remembered, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her Abandoned series

Thea Juliette describes her photographic imagery as coming from both memory and from dreams– “The work is an embodiment of the absence and presence of dreams and fractured memories. Dance stands as a metaphor for the movement through Time.”
FALL BACK, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

FALL BACK, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

Thea Juliette further states, that her “aim in art is to create phenomenological art work that can be experienced and embodied rather than just viewed.”
Velvet Walls Have Names, photograph by Thea Juliette Steveson, from her Abandoned series

Velvet Walls Have Names, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her Abandoned series

The images presented here represent a small selection from the body of work found on the artist’s website .
Follow the development of these photographic series in the images that Thea Juliette Stevenson posts to her Tumblr blog.
Contemplation, photograph by Thea Juliette Steveson, from her COMBUSTION series

Contemplation, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

fifty five, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

fifty five, photograph by Thea Juliette Stevenson, from her COMBUSTION series

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How Artists Use Twitter Article in Professional Artist Magazine + Full Page Feature of Marie Kazalia’s Painting

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While author Vicki Amorose was at work writing her article on how artists use Twitter, she contacted me for a quote. I complied, sending her an entire list of ways I use Twitter, never realizing that her request would result in a full-page feature of my painting in Professional Artists Magazine– on page 34 with credit caption text on facing page 35.

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Get the October art marketing issue of Professional Artist Magazine available in print edition and digital edition here.

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Follow Marie Kazalia’s Art blog here.

The Human Figure in Motion: Couples Pillow-Fight, Dance, and Swim Together in Energetic Play in the Paintings of Allen Bentley

 

Sweet Nothings, Allen Bentley

Sweet Nothings, Allen Bentley

 

“Sometimes having a good start to a painting can be like a springboard, launching you forward in the process,” artist Allen Bentley wrote in a recent post on his blog.

Pillow Talk, Allen Bentley

Pillow Talk, Allen Bentley

“Other times the good start creates stress as you try to hold onto the strength of the initial drawing instead of allowing the painting to develop on it’s own.  The beginning gesture of a painting is my favorite part of the process.  Those first few lines can tell you if you have a fight on your hands or a really good ride.  The whole painting can be found in the first few marks.”

Leverage, Allen Bentley

Leverage, Allen Bentley

Allen Bentley is making his mark with images of swimming couples, dancers made of quick, energetic touches and a bedroom series the artist calls Pillow talk.

Catch a Tiger, Allen Bentley

Catch a Tiger, Allen Bentley

His work focuses on the dynamics of the relationship of a couple at play underwater, in the intimacy of pillow fighting, and through the vitality of dance.  All these bodies of work rely on motion, energetic brushwork, and strong color. You may view images of his work on Allen Bentley’s website: www.allenbentleystudio.com
Rolling Through, Allen Bentley

Rolling Through, Allen Bentley

Allen Bentley received his Master’s of Fine Art from the University of Pennsylvania in 2000 and his Bachelor’s of Fine Art from Western Carolina University in 1996. Bentley was represented by the Bridgette Mayer Gallery from 2001 to 2013 and is currently showing with F.A.N. Gallery, both in Philadelphia. He has exhibited across the country, with solo exhibitions in Philadelphia, New York, Chicago, and San Diego. He has shown in the Philadelphia International Airport and in Artworks at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. In 2009, Bentley had his first solo museum show at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts in Wilmington, DE. Bentley lives in Montgomery Village, MD with his wife and children.

Release, Allen Bentley

Release, Allen Bentley

Artist Guest Blog Post: Rod Jones, Breaking the Habit of Seeing

Breaking the Habit of Seeing, Rod Jones

I know on the surface this may be a bit unsettling to the Visual Artist. Consider that artists spend a lifetime being inspired by visual impressions and the interpretations thereof. What you see and what ultimately ends up in a work of art is invariably not what many artists intend. It’s comforting that you can always fall back on “I meant to do that” or “This came out better than I imagined, I must be a genius”. The reality is often a blend of all three.

For me I was extremely lucky. Vacillating between painting and photography at a very young age, I not so quickly determined that a camera presented a better future for someone with my personality and traits. Having the gift of gab, which I now understand made up for my now fashionable Dyslexia seemed to be a natural genesis of photographing people and objects for money. Commercial Photographers need to know how to sell. Most of the time your ability to communicate visually comes in second place.

Making the transition from Photographer to Brush Artist created a serious dilemma. For years I saw images. In fact, to this day I have to be somewhat careful as to what I expose the minds eye to. A real torment is television news. I can hang onto those images for a lifetime. Not a good thing. I take great comfort in visiting an art gallery, zoo, leisurely walk in the desert or by the ocean. But this in itself is laced with its own visual trickery.

What was your inspiration for that painting? It’s fun to be asked and even fun to explain. But to me this is the curse of really true originality. If you want…and this is not for every artist…you may embrace…Breaking the Habit of Seeing.

Give it a go…stop seeing with your eyes and try to develop visual thinking from within. Let your mind do the dictation. I’ve heard the pioneers of Modernism espouse this mantra. But as I’ve studied their work, more often than not, they were just smearing colors into shapes giving these works an esoteric title. I give Pollock credit for at least saying he was being directed by his sub-conscious mind when he was in the zone. Even he was surprised to see what ended up on the floor canvas. It’s not his work that I necessarily admire, although it’s quite good, but the fact he was forced to give a deeper meaning to his creations and managed to pull it off.

You will know when you pass the inspiration zone and start developing work that is purely inner brain driven. At first you will play hell trying to interpret what messages you’re receiving. The trick is to not be analytical but work at reception. Be prepared for a specific theme to emerge. Depending upon what’s going on deep within your psyche you can pull this off in a matter of months. For me this was a happen-stance. I started out painting what I saw, and I quickly realized that other than technique there was virtually no originality.

Don’t be judgmental of your creativity and never allow others, no matter their level of expertise to judge your work. Let it flow naturally…no time constraints or urgency. Hemingway would write every single day in his Moleskine notebook and commented, “This is crap.” But he also knew where those snippets of creativity were taking him. For every hundred paragraphs of disjointed words, he would give birth to brilliant prose…and he recognized it when he saw it. We can all benefit from the daily flexing of our creative muscles.

Be original…don’t play follow the follower. I realize that this method can improve technical skills but you will be better off in the long run paying less attention to what medium or color palette to use. If you need inspiration clear your mind in front of a blank canvas and be prepared to make many trips to your mind’s ether. During my journey the only reality was the style or name I gave my work. I call it Receptive Abstract Patternism because that is exactly what my history served up from the deepest and rarely visited niches of my mind.

Insight – Rod Jones

Insight – Rod Jones

Thanks to the Artists Who Helped @Artozon Reach 10K Followers on Twitter

Yesterday morning, just 16 followers away from reaching 10,000 followers on my @Artzon Twitter account, I put out the call to follow.  Artists helped me reach my goal a few hours later at noon. This blog post is a special thank you to just some–I’ll be featuring more of those artists in future posts.

YK Hong  is my 10,000th follower– in Brooklyn, New York, Y K Hong is revolutionary, artist, anti-oppression trainer, author, activist, techie, urbanbuddha, troublemaker, awesome–the link to her art site is http://www.ykhong.com/ykart

Watch YK Hong’s TED Talk :

Linda Klein is our 9,999th follower @Artzon follower. Shop hand-painted silk scarves in the Linda Klein Collection Etsy shop here.

Linda Klein

Linda Klein

Thanks to Anne Bevan aka @wncpainter for her tweet:

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and Betty Esperanza @esperanza4hire

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Dil Hildebrand: Exploring Parallels Between Creating Structures and Building Images

Dil Hildebrand, A-201 - 2014, oil and acrylic on canvas, 228 x 183cm

Dil Hildebrand, A-201 – 2014, oil and acrylic on canvas, 228 x 183cm

 

Dil Hildebrand’s work revolves around a study of architectural formations, exploring the parallels between creating structures and building images.

 

Dil Hildebrand, Treehouse  -  2011, oil on canvas, 193 x 148cm

Dil Hildebrand, Treehouse – 2011, oil on canvas, 193 x 148cm

 

In a recent Studio Beat interview, that you can read it its entirety here, we see the artist at work in his studio, gorgeous works in progress leaning against walls. Dil Hildebrand describes to his interviewer and readers how he creates, saying– “In a regular classical painting of a vase on a table, there is pretending. However, what I’m trying to do is have the work physically pretend to be the thing.”

 

Dil Hildebrand, And so on and so forth  -  2013, acrylic on linen, 240 x 290cm

Dil Hildebrand, And so on and so forth – 2013, acrylic on linen, 240 x 290cm

 

Canadian painter Dil Hildebrand has received much critical acclaim since 2006, when he quit his job as a theatre set painter and went back to school for an MFA. Reviews of Dil Hildebrand’s paintings appeared last year in Canadian Art  and Blouin Art Info. Lengthy essays on Hildebrand’s work appear on the artists book publisher YYZ Artists Outlet site, linked here and here.

View more images Dil Hildebrand’s work on his website here.

Urban Outfitters Takes Artist’s Artwork Found Online, Prints On Mini Skirt–Without Artist’s Consent!

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Artist James Soares aka Spires, sells his art prints and art designs printed on 3-D items in his store on the e-commerce site Society 6. Spires created the above side-by-side comparison of his artwork obviously used on the Urban Outfitters mini skirt.  On his Tumblr blog the artist is asking others to reblog his story and share. The Huffington Post wrote this article about the design printed on the mini skirt without the artist’s knowledge, permission, any licensing contract, or payment. The Village Voice published an article on the mini skirt design yesterday. In the comments from readers of the Huffington Post article, one artist wrote, “It’s happened to me. I had my painting “Arizona Sunset” turned into a print for a dress . . . flattering and maddening at the same time.”

According to other artists, and other news stories, Urban Outfitters has copied more than one jewelry design. A necklace in the shape of New York State with a heart cut out, that was designed by Etsy artist Stevie Koerner and available in his e-commerce Etsy store as part of his United States of Love line, appeared in a new Urban Outfitters line of the same name. Steve Koerner wrote, in part, “The World/United States of Love line that I created is one of the reasons that I was able to quit my full-time job.  They even stole the item name as well as some of my copy.”  The story of this design theft appeared, with photos, in the Huffington Post article Urban Outfitters Steal and on the artist’s Tumblr page as Not Cool Urban Outfitters.

Some non-artist commenters on the recent Huff mini skirt article bring up questions of originality. Are these original designs– a map of New York state, the heart shape, a landscape of an Arizona sunset in a painting, or the geometric triangle pattern in the artist’s print (the one obviously copied and used on the mini skirt)? Haven’t we seen these things before and aren’t they part of our collective consciousness owned by all?  Another question, does Urban Outfitters work with another company, BamBam, and are they responsible for the ripped off artist’s design on the mini skirt? Yet, it’s also reported  by The Brooklyn Paper, and in an article in The Village Voice that an Indie jewelry designer selling at a Brooklyn flea market found her designs sold as very similar items by Urban Outfitters. Are such artworks and designs deliberately searched for, copied and used by large companies for the very reason that they doubt small business owners have the resources to fight back? Can these artists prove loss-of-income or originality of design?

It is time-consuming for artist-owners of small businesses to pursue matters legally,  yet one artist that we featured in our blog last year did just that. She received a check in payment, compensating her for the unauthorized use of her artwork on three album covers. The lawyer she worked with was available free of charge via Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts.

I’ve always found the Huffington Post to be artist friendly–publishing artist news  and featuring quality art news columns by several writers. Is Huffington Post the largest news source to cover these matters for artists? The Village Voice supports artists with reports on these artist rip-offs as well.

I can’t help but wonder how many times they get away with it? That is, how many times do such infringements go unnoticed in relation to the few instances companies are caught in outright copyright infringement?

 

 

Art Term: Superfiction

Superfiction 8, Roslishan Ismail, Art KL-itique

Superfiction 8, Roslishan Ismail, Art KL-itique

According to Wikipedia, “a Superfiction is a visual or conceptual artwork which uses fiction and appropriation to mirror organizations, business structures, and/or the lives of invented individuals (Hill). The term was coined by Glasgow-born artist Peter Hill in 1989. Often superfictions are subversive cultural events in which the artwork can be said to escape from the picture frame… into three-dimensional reality.”

The practice of intentionally blurring the boundaries between fiction and fact has many precedents. Perhaps the best known is Orson Welles’ adaptation of H. G. Wells’ The War Of The Worlds which was broadcast in the style of a breaking-news report in October 1938.

A few months ago, we published a feature blog post on Moke Li’s superfiction contemporary art installation Hana Island Super Agency.

In 1989 Peter Hill created his fictive Museum of Contemporary Ideas on New York’s Park Avenue and sent press releases about the museum to news agencies such as Reuters and Associated Press and magazines, newspapers, museums, critics and specialist journals. With its “Encyclopedia of Superfictions”, Hill’s Web site is something of an information hub on methodically related artworks.

Aurora Borealis and Other Night Photography Subjects of Eileen Counihan

Milky-way Airstream, photograph by Eileen Counihan

Eileen Counihan travels across North America in an airstream travel trailer making her night photographs. The light effects in her images are all created in-camera within a single frame. Eileen never uses post-production manipulations of any kind.

“With my night images, I constantly search for new ways to incorporate the paradox of darkness and light into my work. First, I look for the perfect canvas: the blackest night sky, with little or no moon. Then I literally “paint” the night by illuminating the landscape that is hidden in the darkness, while simultaneously capturing the distant stars. My photographs are pure, not digitally manipulated. What we see is what my camera captured – the real night around us. I hope that as people see the world through my photographs, they feel that “realness” and see how the darkest nights can give us the brightest moments,” stated the artist.

Northern Lights 1, photograph by Eileen Counihan

Northern Lights 1, aurora borealis photograph by Eileen Counihan

Eileen was very fortunate to be in Alaska during one of the peaks of Auroral activity in recent years. Her photographs from the middle of March last year caught many aspects of this amazing phenomena. (Many taken on March 17 – the luck of the Irish? )

Northern Lights 7, photograph by Eileen Counihan

Northern Lights 7, photograph by Eileen Counihan

Many of Eileen Counihan’s photographs are available as limited edition prints. Visit her website http://www.eileencounihan.com/

Eileen Counihan is represented by A Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts, and Woodman/Shimko Gallery, Palm Springs, California.

Paying Artists Campaign to Launch May 17th

The new Paying Artists campaign by a-n UK is set to begin on the 17th of May and is about encouraging diversity and creating equality of opportunity for all artists. The campaign will launch a new website and public relations strategy to reach out to and seek to influence the arts-interested public, government and legislators and extend into the communities that artists directly engage with. Many people beyond the arts sector will have a chance to take part in conversations with professional artists, to become aware not only of the realities artists face, but also to experience and understand how artists can enrich society and create well-being.

With over 18,000 members, a-n/AIR brings a big artists’ voice to making the case to transform the contemporary visual arts – for artists, for galleries, for funders and for the wider public.

National and international partners are streaming in to support this vital campaign. Included is Arts Development UK, the membership body for arts managers, who said: “Many of our members work with disadvantaged communities, and the arts can make a real difference to people’s lives. We believe that everyone should have a right to participate and enjoy the arts and that artists should be paid an appropriate wage and valued for offering their services.”

Artists, arts organisers and cultural commentators are invited to lend their weight to the campaign at www.a-n.co.uk/subscribe. To host a campaign debate and presentation contact AIR Communications. Follow the conversations on twitter: #payingartists

 

 

 

Artist Marketing Resources Success Story: One of Our Artists Makes it Big Via Our Efforts!

 

 

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Yes, we’re tooting our own horn and our client’s too! Artist Marketing Resources obtained a first, smaller, art licensing contract for our client William Montgomery, who received hundreds in artist royalties each month the first year. Now, his new major contract with the top fine art publisher McGaw is a game changer and a career maker for William. We obtained this contract for the artist via our services. If you are an artist and would like more information on our services, contact Marie Kazalia via email: MarieKazalia@gmail.com

For artists taking a DIY approach, learn from our experience and expertise in our ebook, the Transmedia Artist Guide to Making Artist Submissions available here.

In addition to the ebook guide, Artist Marketing Resources provides continually researched and updated resource lists for making submissions–these are enormous time saves for artists! Our PDFs of hundreds of pages of clickable links include our International Art Gallery PDF available here, Art Licensing companies, artist agents and artist representatives PDF available here, the Directory of Art Consultants PDF available here,  1,100+ Places to Sell Your Art PDF available here, 2014 Photographers Resources: International Photography Reps and agents, galleries, print sales + much more PDF available here , our Resource list of Art Magazines, art blogs and site for artists to submit to increase their online presence–get the PDF here.

 

Australian Artist Invents the New ARTristic Easel

ARTristic easel Mark 4 with canvas in horizontal position, April 2014

ARTristic easel Mark 4 with canvas in horizontal position, April 2014

For the past four years, Tony Barber, Australian artist, critic, teacher, and member of the 1960’s rock band Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs, has been working on a new easel design. Encouraged by his fellow artists and students to develop this new easel, Tony Barber has been specifically designing it to eradicate the symptoms artists suffer from long hours of work, such as lower back pain, neck pain, sore arms, aching shoulders or weary legs.

ARTristic Easel from back with medium size canvas attached, 2014

Mark 4 ARTristic Easel from back with medium size canvas attached, 2014

His latest and vastly improved Mark 4 version has just been completed. He named it the ARTristic Easel, and judging by the comments and testimonials coming from both experienced and beginner artists lucky enough to have painted with the easel, it certainly appears to be able to do what its inventor claims it can, and so much more!

Designed around the principle that if you remove all the physical and visual impediments and barriers that traditional A and H frame easels place in the way of artists and their work, the benefits combine to such a degree that it allows artists of all mediums to discover and reach their full creative potential.

ARTristic easel rotated so all 4 edges can be painted

ARTristic easel rotated so all 4 edges can be painted

Tony Barber is a man of many talents. He considers himself to be proficient as an artist/painter/illustrator, as a sculptor in paper, as a sculptor in fabric, and as a designer/inventor. Tony is well aware that not all artists are receptive to change. But when art teachers, gallery owners, student and professional artists who used his new easel make bold statements such as … “My art abilities instantly took a giant leap forward.” “Since painting with this easel I have won two art awards.” “There is simply no turning back. This easel has changed my life.” “I wanted an easel I could attach drawing boards, wood panels and stretched canvas to. For me this easel ticks every single box.” “The versatility of the easel is truly revolutionary, taking artists into the 21st century with its ingenious but practical design.” ……….they endorse these words spoken recently by an artist of a different kind. “I respect and have learnt from the traditions of the past, but I’m not going to let them stop me exploring future ones.”  Mick Jagger. Singer. Rolling Stones Rock n Roll band. For more information and to order one or more of these amazing easels for your studio, visit the ARTristic website: http://www.artristic.com/ Questions and enquires to Tony at Email: easyarteasel@gmail.com  For more from the artists who have used the easel, watch this video– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lg9W6BZHSuA

ARTristic easel Mark 4, arms fully extended for large canvas to be attached

ARTristic easel Mark 4, arms fully extended for large canvas to be attached

Canadian Sculptor Birgit Piskor Open House

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Dear friends, colleagues and art enthusiasts,
I am hosting a special showing of my latest work and invite you to come!

With this current work, I continue to explore the concept of transformation and more deeply examine the path of surrender, a path that embraces change and a graceful evolution. Everything changes. At every level. All the time. It is our response to these changes that reverberates within ourselves and within our communities.

I’m very much looking forward to seeing you!
Warm Regards,
Birgit Piskor
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‘ [ Piskor's ] work reveals the best of ourselves….This is the beginning of a long collaboration.’
 
Christine Ventouras
Director, Galerie Krisal
Geneva, Switzerland
 
A couple of extra snaps of sculpture hot off the creative press:
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Contemporary Art Channels

No matter where you live, keep up on contemporary art on YouTube. I began with James Kalm videos of exhibitions in New York City.

Watch the PBS series Art21 high budget video productions of artists in their studios on YouTube.

Artivi produces video interviews of artists in their studios.

View contemporary art exhibitions and interviews with contemporary artists on ArtPatrolTV 

First Look: New Art Online Exhibition + a whole gallery where you can draw or paint on the walls and floors

I worked with an artist a few years ago, who, in a series of performance events with her artist friends, placed a large blank canvas and paints and brushes in the event space on which attendees or audience members were free to paint what they wished. The canvas was then exhibited at the next performance and exhibition. This may have been idea circulating with young artists for some time, and which has now found its way into museum venues.  The New Museum in New York , which considers its spaces a leading destination for new ideas and new art, currently has the exhibition Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors,  which includes a whole gallery where anyone can draw or paint on the walls and the floors, and whatever you make becomes part of the exhibition: http://bit.ly/1gbRftO

The New Museum also has an online only exhibition series titled First Look: New Art Online,  a monthly series of innovative online projects and new commissions by the New Museum.

The New Museum wishes to become a hub of innovative artistic practice. The New Museum has also conceived the first museum-led incubator program called NEW INC. The NEW INC program, which will launch in the summer of 2014, will be a collaborative creative space with a lab-like environment for the development of new ideas and practices for creatives exploring cross-disciplinary  and technology based projects. The New Museum feels that because such creative individuals and artist groups are exploring work in still undefined cultural areas, that few resources and support systems exist for them, and so the NEW INC program offers a twelve-month residency to provide the needed space and resources. Find more on NEW INC here, including how to apply.