Australian Artist Invents the New ARTristic Easel

ARTristic easel Mark 4 with canvas in horizontal position, April 2014

ARTristic easel Mark 4 with canvas in horizontal position, April 2014

For the past four years, Tony Barber, Australian artist, critic, teacher, and member of the 1960′s rock band Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs, has been working on a new easel design. Encouraged by his fellow artists and students to develop this new easel, Tony Barber has been specifically designing it to eradicate the symptoms artists suffer from long hours of work, such as lower back pain, neck pain, sore arms, aching shoulders or weary legs.

ARTristic Easel from back with medium size canvas attached, 2014

Mark 4 ARTristic Easel from back with medium size canvas attached, 2014

His latest and vastly improved Mark 4 version has just been completed. He named it the ARTristic Easel, and judging by the comments and testimonials coming from both experienced and beginner artists lucky enough to have painted with the easel, it certainly appears to be able to do what its inventor claims it can, and so much more!

Designed around the principle that if you remove all the physical and visual impediments and barriers that traditional A and H frame easels place in the way of artists and their work, the benefits combine to such a degree that it allows artists of all mediums to discover and reach their full creative potential.

ARTristic easel rotated so all 4 edges can be painted

ARTristic easel rotated so all 4 edges can be painted

Tony Barber is a man of many talents. He considers himself to be proficient as an artist/painter/illustrator, as a sculptor in paper, as a sculptor in fabric, and as a designer/inventor. Tony is well aware that not all artists are receptive to change. But when art teachers, gallery owners, student and professional artists who used his new easel make bold statements such as … “My art abilities instantly took a giant leap forward.” “Since painting with this easel I have won two art awards.” “There is simply no turning back. This easel has changed my life.” “I wanted an easel I could attach drawing boards, wood panels and stretched canvas to. For me this easel ticks every single box.” “The versatility of the easel is truly revolutionary, taking artists into the 21st century with its ingenious but practical design.” ……….they endorse these words spoken recently by an artist of a different kind. “I respect and have learnt from the traditions of the past, but I’m not going to let them stop me exploring future ones.”  Mick Jagger. Singer. Rolling Stones Rock n Roll band. For more information and to order one or more of these amazing easels for your studio, visit the ARTristic website: http://www.artristic.com/ Questions and enquires to Tony at Email: easyarteasel@gmail.com  For more from the artists who have used the easel, watch this video– http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lg9W6BZHSuA

ARTristic easel Mark 4, arms fully extended for large canvas to be attached

ARTristic easel Mark 4, arms fully extended for large canvas to be attached

About these ads

Canadian Sculptor Birgit Piskor Open House

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Dear friends, colleagues and art enthusiasts,
I am hosting a special showing of my latest work and invite you to come!

With this current work, I continue to explore the concept of transformation and more deeply examine the path of surrender, a path that embraces change and a graceful evolution. Everything changes. At every level. All the time. It is our response to these changes that reverberates within ourselves and within our communities.

I’m very much looking forward to seeing you!
Warm Regards,
Birgit Piskor
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‘ [ Piskor's ] work reveals the best of ourselves….This is the beginning of a long collaboration.’
 
Christine Ventouras
Director, Galerie Krisal
Geneva, Switzerland
 
A couple of extra snaps of sculpture hot off the creative press:
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blogretroTV

Contemporary Art Channels

No matter where you live, keep up on contemporary art on YouTube. I began with James Kalm videos of exhibitions in New York City.

Watch the PBS series Art21 high budget video productions of artists in their studios on YouTube.

Artivi produces video interviews of artists in their studios.

View contemporary art exhibitions and interviews with contemporary artists on ArtPatrolTV 

First Look: New Art Online Exhibition + a whole gallery where you can draw or paint on the walls and floors

I worked with an artist a few years ago, who, in a series of performance events with her artist friends, placed a large blank canvas and paints and brushes in the event space on which attendees or audience members were free to paint what they wished. The canvas was then exhibited at the next performance and exhibition. This may have been idea circulating with young artists for some time, and which has now found its way into museum venues.  The New Museum in New York , which considers its spaces a leading destination for new ideas and new art, currently has the exhibition Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors,  which includes a whole gallery where anyone can draw or paint on the walls and the floors, and whatever you make becomes part of the exhibition: http://bit.ly/1gbRftO

The New Museum also has an online only exhibition series titled First Look: New Art Online,  a monthly series of innovative online projects and new commissions by the New Museum.

The New Museum wishes to become a hub of innovative artistic practice. The New Museum has also conceived the first museum-led incubator program called NEW INC. The NEW INC program, which will launch in the summer of 2014, will be a collaborative creative space with a lab-like environment for the development of new ideas and practices for creatives exploring cross-disciplinary  and technology based projects. The New Museum feels that because such creative individuals and artist groups are exploring work in still undefined cultural areas, that few resources and support systems exist for them, and so the NEW INC program offers a twelve-month residency to provide the needed space and resources. Find more on NEW INC here, including how to apply.

 

VIDEO—Deborah Grant at the Drawing Center: Whitehot Magazine

The Drawing Center in New York came into existence in 1977. In 2006, the Drawing Center’s artist registry application process and archive went online. Many artists applied and the registry increased to over 2,500 artists. Up until recently, The Drawing Center allowed artists to upload their artwork images for curatorial review and acceptance into this curated artist registry, which is open to use by curators and others art professionals. But now, the Drawing Center has redesigned their website and submissions program. They no longer accept new submissions for their artist registry. However, they encourage artists to apply to their newly launched artists’ platform, Open Sessions.  Open Sessions is a two-year program open to artists working in a variety of disciplines. Open Sessions will offer selected artists exhibition opportunities in The Drawing Center’s Lab Space and other venues, as well as studio visits, public programs, and informal gatherings.

Paul Rooms

The Skillful and Playful Watercolor Paintings of New York Artist Paul Rooms

THROW OFF THE BOWLINES, SAIL AWAY FROM THE SAFE HARBOR,E XPLORE, DREAM DISCOVER...(M.Twain quote) art by Paul Rooms

THROW OFF THE BOWLINES, SAIL AWAY FROM THE SAFE HARBOR,EXPLORE, DREAM DISCOVER…(M.Twain quote) art by Paul Rooms

Watercolors are the medium of New York artist Paul Rooms. He uses his skillful painting techniques to visually explore the human soul, meaning in metaphor, and his inner child. His subject matter and style are influenced by the painting traditions of his ancestral countries. “From the Flemish comes my surrealistic eye and to Italian art I owe color and construction”, says Paul, who was raised and educated in Italy.  He professed his ardent love for certain ancient and modern masters–from Vermeer to Magritte, from Bosch to Steinberg–as he worked over the years to develop his own personal style of painting. Paul Rooms has had several solo exhibitions and his artwork is in many private collections world-wide.

Paul Room’s website contains an online shop of very reasonably priced artworks, at: http://www.paulrooms.com

Il sogno premonitore 1

If I can't dance, dianne k webb

If I can’t dance–the paintings of dianne k webb

If I can't dance, dianne k webb

If I can’t dance, dianne k webb

In dianne k webb’s painting, If I can’t dance, female heads with yellow hair and calligraphic arms dance across a city skyline. “I believe that art is a dance, a communication between artist and viewer…” says the artist. “As I work, I want to find myself exploring new perspectives—I want to feel uneasy, jarred, contemplative, or reflective as images, colors, textures clash or meld. I am fascinated by the moment of “ah ha!” of “really?” My work seeks to capture those moments and translate them conceptually, abstractly on the canvas, into words or through theater.

The titles dianne k webb’s has chosen for her paintings are, not surprisingly, filled with the language of dance and theater. In addition to being a painter, dianne is also the director of the Next Iteration Theater in Houston, Texas. Interestingly, the logo image dianne chose for her Next Iteration Theater website, is her own photograph of headless sculptural forms inside an ancient church in Paris.

HEADLESS, dianne k webb

HEADLESS, dianne k webb

Next Iteration Theater is in its infancy, according to dianne. “I am just bringing together a few people who want to be part of this project and we are just setting up the “legal” pieces….figuring out our structure, which will be ensemble in how we operate with actors, and in general. I am teaching acting classes here in Houston and building up some interest that way. I believe that actors need affordable classes so they can work on skills when they are not performing and hone their craft, after all as an artist I spend hours every day in the studio.”
Dianne also directs for several small theaters in Houston and loves working with new playwrights. She is interested in “casting across races and ethnicities and changing how we “see” traditional pieces…something I do not find in many theaters here, in spite of the vast diversity in Houston.”
El Malecon, dianne k webb

El Malecon, dianne k webb

The tiny human figures in dianne k webb’s painting titled El Malecon appear to be traversing the globe, while the forms in her painting titled But You Thrive seem to be pure abstract movement.

But You Thrive, dianne k webb

But You Thrive, dianne k webb

Also recurring in webb’s paintings, the viewer will find handwritten text as visual element. Refer back to the Next Iteration Theater logo image and note that the headless sculptural forms are holding books in their arms. And so we see the recurring visual elements of the artist’s themes of text, the writing of the playwright, human figures, movement, and abstract forms in motion as they seem to move into place to suggest form, connect, and disperse to dance again on a stage. Or, as the artist herself wrote, her paintings are– “a statement laid bare until picked up and incorporated into a new narrative.”

Constructively, dianne k webb

Constructively, dianne k webb

Let Go Again and Again, dianne k webb

Let Go Again and Again, dianne k webb

Visit dianne k webb’s artist site www.diannekwebb.com

Next Iteration Theater website www.nextiterationtheater.com

Follow dianne on Twitter https://twitter.com/diannekwebb

and on Facebook  www.facebook.com/diannekwebbarts

A gallery of paintings by dianne k webb

Unlocked, Doors Banging, dianne k webb

Unlocked, Doors Banging, dianne k webb

Love Wide Open, dianne k webb

Love Wide Open, dianne k webb

Learning To Love, dianne k webb

Learning To Love, dianne k webb

Concretely 72, dianne k webb

Concretely, dianne k webb

Wide Open, dianne k webb

Wide Open, dianne k webb

Differently is Hard, dianne k webb

Differently is Hard, dianne k webb

Moment By Moment, dianne k webb

Moment By Moment, dianne k webb

New Ebook by New York Artist Barbara Rachko Available on Amazon Kindle

BlogFrom Pilot to Painter Final

Here is the link to a good description of the book, plus the first reader’s review http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00HNVR200

You don’t have to own a Kindle device to read this ebook. You can download a free Kindle app as follows:

Here is the one for MACs:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=1000464931

Here is a link for the rest:

Kindle Cloud Reader - Read instantly in your browser

Smartphones - iPhone & iPod touch, Android, Windows Phone,  BlackBerry

Computers - Mac, Windows 8, Windows 7, XP & Vista

Tablets - iPad, Android Tablet, Windows 8

http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=sv_kstore_3?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771

MOCA Cleveland

MOCA Cleveland Artist Opportunities

MOCA Cleveland

MOCA Cleveland

Last week I visited MOCA Cleveland. The new museum has a program whereby curators visit local artist’s studios to provide feedback and opportunities for each artist. The day I visited MOCA Cleveland, two galleries featured artworks by two Cleveland artists–Michelle Grabner and Simon Evans. I used my iPad camera to snap some shots of the art and shared them on Instagram using the museum’s WiFi connection. Here are a few of the photos.

Michelle Grabner, MOCA Cleveland

Michelle Grabner, MOCA Cleveland

Rhyming Opportunities, Simon Evans, MOCA Cleveland

Rhyming Opportunities, Simon Evans, MOCA Cleveland

Michelle Grabner floor piece (detail)

Michelle Grabner floor piece (detail)

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner, enamel paint pattern painting

Michelle Grabner, enamel paint pattern painting

Simon Evans, Map Tongue

Simon Evans, Map Tongue

Simon Evans

Simon Evans

MOCA Cleveland gallery view

MOCA Cleveland gallery view

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner, silverpoint drawing on black canvas

Michelle Grabner, silverpoint drawing on black canvas

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner

Michelle Grabner

Fred and Ginger, Jane Gottlieb

Jane Gottlieb: “Enriching a Whole Busy University With My Art”

Jane Gottlieb I just completed and installed her large scale artwork titled My Bilbao for the for UCLA Anderson School of Management and Business. My Bilbao is a 5′ x 10′ fine art archival printing on shiny canvas. Jane worked from a photograph that she took of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and enhanced with Photoshop.

Bilboa photograph by Jane Gottlieb

Guggenheim Bilbao photograph by Jane Gottlieb

My Bilboa, Jane Gottlieb

My Bilbao, Jane Gottlieb

In addition to the commissioned work My Bilbao, Jane Gottlieb has installed 70 of her large at pieces at UCLA, with all the artworks on loan for 10 years! Her artwork fills 4 floors of the UCLA Hugh & Hazel Darling Law Library.

The majority of 45 total large artworks at the Law Library have the dimensions 30 x 40 inches, with 3 of the 45 artworks a larger size of 50 x 70 inches.

Twenty-five more large artworks by Jane Gottlieb are on display at the UCLA Anderson School of Business and Management.

“It’s wonderful to be able to really enrich a whole busy University building with my art,” says Jane Gottlieb. “I have gotten wonderful feedback, and both places gave me the best receptions I have every had after 30 years of art openings! My art has been up a year now.”

Jane Gottlieb is interested in doing more commissions at special order dimensions. “I have done commissions of people’s cars, and am excited about doing more larger mural-size pieces in the near future,” said the artist.

You will find Jane Gottlieb’s contact information here

Visit Jane Gottlieb’s website to view more of her colorful artworks: http://www.janegottlieb.com

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Meaning in the Moke Li Mixed Media Art Installation–Hana Island Super Agency

Hana Island Super Agency, installation, Moke LI

Hana Island Super Agency, installation, Moke LI

A grand logo is displayed on the monitor; armchairs, indoor plants and an office carpet all in a setting to create a seemingly calm, peaceful, everyday scene. However, the goal of this installation is to stimulate spectators’ critical reflection on our hyperreal society and its power, which is continuously executed on micro levels. The intention of the artist is to create an ambience here tainted with death, a world resembling “the smile of a corpse in a funeral home, ” to quote from Jean Baudrillard, The Transparency of Evil : Essays on Extreme Phenomena.

Artist Moke Li’s installation HANA Island Super Agency is a mixed-media work simulating the reception area of a fake agency located in a holiday resort. Some elements in this piece were extracted from a real Chinese tourist city named Hainan Island. The island was originally demarcated as one of China’s special economic zones as part of the country’s economic reform policy–a place where people rapidly accumulate capital and power. Since the island has rich tourism resources, the tourism industry unites with mass media in making non-stop propaganda and manufacturing consumer demands in order to encourage people to consume. Yet the island has been ruined by rapid and extreme development; many unfinished buildings have been left on the island after the housing bubble burst in the 1990s. “For me, the interesting point is how a dilapidated island has been figured as paradise by propaganda. It’s a case in which the boundaries between reality and spectacle have become extremely contorted,” says Moke Li in her essay on her installation project.

Moke Li, Hana Island Super Agency, installation (detail)

Moke Li, Hana Island Super Agency, installation (detail)

Many elements in this installation have symbolic meaning.  The created rebar shelves denote the China state apparatus of control, that different parts share in a homogeneous structure guaranteeing social order by establishing institutions, statutes, ideologies, language and knowledge. The rebar is also a very important symbol of the abandoned buildings in the real-life Hainan Island.

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The irrational or non-rational elements in this installation, such as the fiberglass insulation on display shelves, weird souvenirs including monkey-head-shaped glass pots filled with energy drinks, postcards, and sculptural souvenirs shaped as red hands and bowling balls–gifts made from molds and mass-produced–are all meant to provide an entry-point to refuse the reality with which we’re confronted.

Hana Island Super Agency (detail), Installation, Moke Li

Hana Island Super Agency (detail), Installation, Moke Li

By incorporating these objects in his installation, Moke Li comments on ancient craft, long associated with quality and much manual labor, but within the logic of commodity production the concerns have shifted to quantities and efficiency rather than quality, destroying many ancient crafts, not just glass blowing.

Rebar, Glass, Fiber Glass, Paper, Plastic, Monitor & Projectors, CG Animation

The extremely flattened and detailed CG animation shows the hyperreal content of wonderful beaches and holiday villages behind sliding doors. As George Ritzer says: “It is a simulation that is more real than real, more beautiful than beautiful, truer than true. In a hyperreal world there is no way of getting at the source–the original reality.” For many people,  in their routine lives they are surrounded by simulation and images all the time– all designed and used to manipulate their desires.

Strange scenes flash on the projected videos on two walls of the installation, designed to contrive an illusory scene for viewers in order to allow them to feel those counterintuitive moments, and lead viewers to understand the underlying reality. A scene, which is of an unfinished structure, flashes for less than half a second in both projected videos. It is too quick to see clearly, so spectators are prone to believe it is their own hallucination or that something has gone wrong at that moment.

Stacks of different postcards designed by the artist sit on the shelves in the installation.  One of the postcards has an image of airships in sausage shapes covered with advertisements, making a statement on how media exercises its implicit violence and power through the non-stop bombardment of information and the promotion of various symbols. At the same time, mass media produces institutionalized and standardized welcoming smiles and attentive services. People can see advertisements simulating those intimate, personal communications happening between friends or loving couples in plastic-like tender feelings at the service of promoting consumption.  Causing consumers to lose their own values as they voluntarily follow media-oriented trends.

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Moke Li also associates scuba diving training and certification with the island tourism industry, and designed postcards “promoting” this content. Various training institutions have replaced the traditional confined school environment, and have become deeper-seated control mechanisms by providing special courses and one-on-one counseling. It seems as if there is more freedom. Many youths participate in continuing education voluntarily in order to gain more abilities which are recognized by society. Meanwhile, the training institutions have molded teenagers’ perceptions and preferences to make them believe it is sacred and beneficial that their leisure time be occupied.

Postcard 3, Fast Deeper Stronger, Moke Li

Postcard 3, Fast Deeper Stronger, Moke Li

Another recurring symbol in this piece is the gesture of the erect palm, which, in the mind of the artist, connotes the forbidden–the raised hand a symbol of oppressive force.

blogMokeLiPost card-1HanaIslandGolfCourseHanaIslandSuperAgencyProductions

Ironically, in HANA Island Super Agency, the palm also serves as one of those cheap tourist souvenirs.  Associated with social reality in China, for its people, the external oppressive power is obvious to feel and understand. Therefore, it is no longer an insidious enemy and it will be defeated and destroyed in the end. But it is hard for people to defeat their inner desires. They adhere to them in order to make correct value judgments when facing the dazzling array of consumer information. Baudrillard describes America as a desert, implying lack of depth and emotion.  Yet China has been inevitably importing the American mode of consumption during the decades of implementing reform and opening policy. Such consumption is an insidious and concealed power which could make people consume things beyond their needs–more dangerous than the visible governing power authority.

Moke Li’s website: http://limokeart.com

Moke Li, Hana Island Super Agency Installation

Hana Island Super Agency (detail), Installation, Moke Li

Hana Island Super Agency, Installation (detail), Moke Li

blogMokeLiPost card-1HanaIslandGolfCourseHanaIslandSuperAgencyProductions

50% Off Loneliness Postcard, Hana Island Super Agency Installation, Moke Li

50% Off Loneliness Postcard, Hana Island Super Agency Installation, Moke Li

Image converted using ifftoany

Postcard 3, Fast Deeper Stronger, Moke Li

Postcard 3, Fast Deeper Stronger, Moke Li

Moke Li, installation detail

Moke Li, installation detail

Moke Li, installation detail

Moke Li, installation detail

blogMokeLiinstallationhana6

Moke Li, installation view

Moke Li, installation view

BlogMokeLeeinstallationhana1

blog_Elizadress20

Artist Elizabeth Fuller on the Intersection of Art and Technology

Dragon Skin, Elizabeth Fuller

Life Dress F2, Elizabeth Fuller

My introduction to technology has been both direct and circuitous. I grew up in Silicon Valley and quickly learned that the best method to get my way with my electrical engineer father was to present my arguments as a methodical solution. Yet, when the time came to go to college I pursued a degree in the liberal arts. It was only during my junior year that I enrolled in an introduction to programming using Processing. Enamored by the ability to draw programmatically, I picked up an emphasis in computing and applied for a masters program at Tisch’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). It was there that I was introduced to the artistic potential beyond the computer screen, with interactive sculptural using the Arduino and a growing comfort with power tools.
Throughout my time at ITP, I participated in several student shows, and it was the exposure in those events that lead to an invitation to participate in a show of interactive art in Barcelona. That was eye-opening. ITP was more a sandbox for prototyping concepts than a studio for refining work.  I had never fully build out a piece that I would not be present to set up and maintain throughout its time on display. It traveled poorly.  As a result, I’ve constrained my participation to events where I can personally deliver my work. Limiting, yes, but I’m still finding that sweet spot between concept and execution.  Moreover, there is an element of user experience that I have only come to appreciate recently.
blog_ElizabethF6
I showed my piece, Schrödinger in Boston for a month.  It is a relatively simple piece.  There is nothing to touch. It uses a proximity sensor to react to viewers and it can be turned on and off by simply plugging and unplugging it. I was, therefore, at a loss to think of what was wrong when the gallery informed me that the piece had stopped working after a few days. It was only a few months later, when I could stand near and watch people interact with it at an event in Queens, NY, that I saw that people were mistaking my sensor for a button and systematically breaking it with startling regularity. In the absence of prior knowledge of the piece and its intent, people would poke, prod, and even push the piece to achieve their anticipated interaction. Given that the piece was specifically programmed to be in defiance of expectation the inevitable, and yet overlooked, result would be a broken work of art.
Schrodinger II, Elizabeth Fuller

Schrodinger II, Elizabeth Fuller

This is the main challenge and point of excitement that I have encountered on the intersection of art and technology: it is not yet codified and can still establish its own set of rules. With paintings, we look. With music, we listen. But what to do with something that reacts to the way you try to interact with it?  Some pieces are meant to be touched, taken, or augmented. It falls on the artist to be more than just creator, to do more than guide the eye through his or her composition, but to also create an independent system for the public to experience their work.
Follow Elizabeth on Twitter @jumpingship

Video: UK Painter Martin Finnin At Work in His Studio

I want to share this video interview of a UK artist. I love his angst-free descriptions of his painting process and love of the light in his studio, simplifying the complex process of painting into something pleasant and interesting.

blogartistcollective

Artist Collective Art Project Funding Grants for Artists, Writers, Performers, Musicians in Los Angeles

The Artist Collective project is truly thinking outside the box with their Artists Collective  Los Angeles County  Medical Marijuana Delivery Service. Based in West Hollywood, the ArtistsCollectiveLA.org  Delivers Pot To Fund A Community Arts Organization.

Artists Collective is a different kind of medical marijuana service. They’re an art project in and of itself. They aspire to create a medical marijuana non-profit where a considerable percentage of their proceeds go toward funding grants for artists, writers, performers, and musicians.

San Francisco Monday 1971, Irena Orlov

Shop for Art: Irena Orlov’s Hand Embellished Textured Fine Art Canvas Giclee


Hand-embelllished Giclee canvas art, by Irena Orlov

Hand-embellished Giclee canvas art, by Irena Orlov


Shop for Irena Orlov's hand-embellished, textured fine art canvas Giclee artworks here. These Gallery Wrap canvases have finished edges to provide a clean look from front, side, and back. The Giclee canvas is stretched on  1 1/2'' wooden support bars to create a finished look that allows you to hang without a frame.

Most Available in Sizes 40 x 30 and 40 x 40 inches, with select artwork in 24 x 48 inch dimensions.

New York Friday October 1863, Irena Orlov

New York Friday October 1863, Irena Orlov