How to size your images for social media: A cheat sheet

Last week, artist Harriete Estel Berman sent me a tweet asking me to share some information she discovered – a guide to images for social media titled: How to size images on social media: A cheat sheet.

Harriete stated that it “Usually it takes me multiple tries till I figure out what size image will  work…a huge waste of time. Next time, I will refer to this chart.This cheat sheet is a super fantastic resource because it removes the trial and error in creating a fabulous background or header. An eye-catching image is a great way to build visibility for your art or crafts creating a personal style across all platforms. For artists and makers this is absolutely essential!”

Infographics may be all the rage, but this one is actually useful. The Cheat Sheet was created by LunaMetrics—who invite you to print it out and share. View the entire Cheat Sheet sizing chart here.

Includes image sizing for all the biggies–Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and LinkedIN. Here is just the upper part of the Cheat Sheet:

Screen shot 2013-02-22 at 7.11.52 AM

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Artists: Inside Info On How You Can Influence Online Arts Content

English: Screen Capture of article of front pa...

English: Screen Capture of article of front page of Yahoo! (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m going to tell you how I get paid for the articles I write and publish. The purpose of this blog post is not to tell you how I get paid. Even though I do that. The purpose of this post is to let you know that you have more control over online content than you think!

How can you exert control over online content?

If you’re like me, you’ve signed up to receive notices in your email inbox or RSS feed when your favorite online authors publish new articles on such sites as Mashable, Huffington Post Arts, Yahoo! Movies, and many others.

You may wonder how authors are paid for their ideas and time researching and writing these articles. The answer may surprise you!

As contributing writer for both Yahoo! and Technorati News I am paid a dollar amount each time someone clicks on a link within my published articles. Those clicks represent my click-through rate.

Who pays me?

Yahoo! pays based on click-through-rate on links within my Yahoo! articles. I also receive a much lesser amount based on the total number of reader views that my article receives. Yahoo! deposits payments into my PayPal account. Yahoo! also provides extensive analytics so I can track my readership and earnings, and via those stats I can easily see what articles and article topics are the most popular and what links receive the most clicks. (Of course I want to get paid for my work, so I consider these stats when planning future articles).

Technorati news has a similar set-up. Since they are closely linked to Google–with all Technorati news articles feeding into Google news–Google pays me. Google pays varying amounts for each click on links within my published Technorati news articles. I track those clicks, readership numbers, and payment amounts per article via my Google AdSense account. (Again, the more success an article brings the more l will want to write on that topic in future articles and promote those articles enthusiastically).

So you are probably thinking that for each article authors must receive hundreds or even thousands of dollars in total clicks–but that is just not the case!

While hundreds or even thousands of readers may read any given article online, the number of clicks on links within an article is generally quite low. This is frustrating to all authors of online articles–even top authors! “We all have that problem,” one top author told me when I asked about improving click-through rates.

Why do hundreds of people read online articles without clicking on those internal links? This phenomenon is something that many experts have analyzed and written about in numerous articles on click-through-rates. This payment structure I have described is why you often see sensationalized,  rather silly or limited value content online—the authors are hoping to find a gimmick that will make their content a hit so that it will go viral and they will receive a large number of click-throughs and high total payment.

So what does this mean to you?

Think about it. Now you better understand the secret to exerting control over what gets published online!  

If you have favorite online authors you’d like to keep around and support, then thoroughly review their articles and click on those article links of interest to see where they go! Share the articles you like best with others via email. Use the share features to post articles to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and other social media site and include comments on why you like the article. You are exerting control over online content with each click and share. With each click you are paying those authors who provide the information you like and value. Your clicks bring attention to those articles, and attention both to the authors and the content subjects.  Remember, Google is watching and analyzing those stats you generate when you click. Google pays authors for each click, so you can be sure that they pay attention to where their money goes. It’s easy to let Google know what you like and value with each click.

You the reader have more control over online content than you think! If you want Google to place more value on art related content then support those authors who write on the arts by clicking on those internal article links and sharing those articles widely.

Want more online articles on your own artworks published?

Authors of articles value a well written press release that provides the full details and includes jpeg images. ( I am glad to receive these from artists.) Now that you know that most authors of online articles do not receive an hourly rate of pay, you understand how important it is for you to provide full details in your press releases and keep your website Newsroom up to date.

One artist, who didn’t even have a blog or website, once told me–”you can go around and search the web for information about me”, when I asked him for a press release.  WRONG! If you don’t have time to write a press release, I don’t have free time to do that for you, and neither do other authors of online content. If you want to become the subject of more online articles, get more exposure and visibility for your art, then it is up to you to organize,  present and provide your information.

Artists and Arts Organizations may send their press releases to me, Marie Kazalia, via email, at: MarieKazalia@gmail.com

SAMPLE ARTICLE: Here is the link to one of my recently published Technorati articles containing artist news.

Google Art Project and Wikipediart

Google Art Project

Google Art Project (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I love to research artists on Pinterest and online, but what I find is limited to what others have uploaded which can be frustrating when looking for quality examples by specific artists. Other artists have mentioned the limitations of finding art images online. Few seem to know about a couple of comprehensive resources for finding and viewing art online–Google Art Project and Wikipediart.

Google Art Project 

What is the Google Art Project?

The Google Art Project is a collaboration between Google and 151 acclaimed art partners from across 40 countries. Using a combination of various Google technologies and expert information provided by their museum partners, users can explore a range of artworks at brush stroke level detail, take a virtual tour of a museum and even build their own collections to share.

Few people will ever be lucky enough to be able to visit every museum or see every work of art they’re interested in, but now many more can enjoy over 30,000 works of art from sculpture to architecture and drawings and explore over 150 collections from 40 countries, all in one place. We’re lucky that Google has the technology to make this kind of project a reality.

In addition to the incredible artwork from collections around the world, such as paintings, drawings, sculptures, historic and religious artefacts, photographs and important manuscripts, there is a wealth of additional material such as expertly narrated videos, audio guides, viewing notes, and detailed information to provide an invaluable range of content for visitors.

Simply select a museum from the homepage and then either choose ‘Explore the museum’ or ‘View Artwork’. Once you are in the main site use the drop-down menus or the side info bar to navigate between artworks and museums. You can also create and share your own collections online.

Wikipediart is a collection of art blogs for your to explore and review. Artists can easily create their own free simple blog to share their artwork and artist news on the Wikipediart site. Navigating Wikipedia art is similar StumbleUpon–you click a button at upper left to view the next blog. There is also a Wikipedia Art Shop that opened on May 6, 2012. One artist set up an Ebay + Wikipedia Art Shop and sent me the link.  Very few artists are aware of this new free resource to promote their art. In fact, it seems a bit dead there. But you can be one of the first to start livening things up by adding your art in a blog or as part of the art shop.

e-flux applies to develop the new .art internet domain

Plaque on the ICANN (Internet Corporation for ...

Plaque on the ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) head office, Del Rey, California, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Yesterday, e-flux sent out this announcement:Dear Colleagues,We are writing to inform you about a new development that will have a serious impact for art practitioners, institutions of art, and art publics world-wide.

The structure of the internet is about to shift in such a way that most information pertaining to food will be found in a .food domain, while most information on cars will likely be found in a .car domain, and so forth. While at the moment this may appear to be a small technical modification, it may have very significant consequences in the long run. For many people, the internet has already become a major educational tool. And while the internet is the first place we look to when we seek to learn something, it also has a capacity that goes beyond this: as millions of people around the world use the internet to find answers to questions about art, the results they get will, over time, shape their conception of art.

The authority that controls the internet by managing the database of addresses of every website and webpage (ICANN), has accepted applications and announced the list of companies who have applied to open and manage new top-level domain names—what comes after the dot in the web address: .com, .org, .uk and so forth. The application process is now closed; nearly 2000 applications were submitted and more than 500 new internet domains will be approved within a year, ranging from .baby to .berlin and .art.

A full list of new domains that will come into existence in a few months can be viewed here.

It is incredibly important for all of us that the Art domain on the internet be developed by a knowledgeable and responsible party, and in a focused and accessible way. e-flux has applied for the rights to develop and administer the .art domain, with the hopes of maintaining and distributing such a domain in a way that emphasizes the quality, content, and educational and ethical values of the art community—something we have been able to achieve with the e-flux announcement service for over a decade. Should we get the rights to develop the Art domain, an advisory board of artists, art historians, and curators will be formed to oversee the policies of this important resource. We have also pledged to return a significant part of the income produced by this service back to the art community, in the form of grants and funding for art institutions and projects in places where art funding is insufficient or entirely lacking.

Beginning in 1999 as an informal mailing list, e-flux is an artist-run organization that has grown tremendously over the past ten years, largely due to your involvement. In 2008 we were able to start a free monthly journal whose readership now extends to many parts of the world. We have published books and realized many projects, exhibitions, lectures, and seminars, all of which were made available to audiences internationally. Most importantly, we have been able to develop and maintain a truly independent resource for information on contemporary art that is trusted, highly regarded, and accessible to readers for free. We envision the Art domain as an important resource for art professionals, educators, institutions, and especially the public at large.

e-flux is the only applicant from the art community and we feel that it’s extremely important that the Art domain be managed from within our community. The process of evaluating our application has started and we are up against corporate investors and commercial interests, some of whom have many millions to spend, and who have secured high power law firms, etc.

For those of you who would like to learn more about e-flux’s plans and commitment to the art community as it regards to .ART TLD, please review our application at here.

We need your support to keep the domain of Art in the community of people who make, study, present, and love art. ICANN is now accepting public comments, which can be made via this link. The comments will be considered by independent evaluators and will make a difference, and your endorsement would be deeply appreciated.

Sincerely,
e-flux

A draft endorsement comment could look like this:

Dear ICANN,

Our organization/individual practitioner, (insert name), is an active member of the art community since (insert date / year). Our activities consist of (briefly describe your organization or your professional activity), as can be seen on our website (insert URL).

We fully support and endorse e-flux’s application for the .ART TLD, and share their forward-looking vision for this innovative name space.

Sincerely,
(insert name of representative)
(insert name of individual/ company / organization)

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