Print Swap Project via Instagram

 

The Print Swap is a project of the photography site Feature Shoot.

HOW IT WORKS:

Photographers from around the world and across all genres are invited to submit images via Instagram to be considered for the print swap. To submit, please hashtag your images #theprintswap. All images submitted must be able to be printed at 8.5×11 inches.

You can view the photos Feature Shoot has already selected by going to their Instagram account here and their Twitter here.

If your photo is chosen by The Print Swap project you will get to swap your photo–which they will have professionally printed–with another photographer who is also in the swap. The photographers involved will each give and receive a print. Part of the fun is that the print everyone gets are chosen at random, which means the print you receive in the mail will be a total surprise.

All prints will be beautifully printed by Skink Ink in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The print swap is a fun new way to add some photography to your own walls AND have your work seen by other photographers around the world. To submit– hashtag your images #theprintswap or you can email them to theprintswap@gmail.com

There is no submission fee to enter, however, if your image is chosen there will be a one-time cost of $40 which you will pay via Submittable at the same time you upload your high res file for printing. There are no additional costs beyond that and The Print Swap/ Feature Shoot will take care of everything else, including printing and shipping the selected images. Just be sure that all images you submit can be printed at 8.5×11 inches.

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Opportunity to Collectively Purchase NYC Artist Studios

 

This opportunity is getting shared around the web, and in case you missed it, we wanted to re-post these details for artists looking for studio space:

Artcondo: Opportunity To Collectively Purchase Nyc Work Space

ArtCondo (www.ArtCondo.com) is a NYC real estate initiative founded and run by artists, that helps creative individuals purchase raw commercial workspaces and live/work lofts in a new way. ArtCondo gathers creative people together to form buying groups to leverage their collective buying power and cultural capital to purchase space collectively. Each building becomes a haven protecting artists and producers from future displacement, and connecting them to surrounding communities. Fine artists, writers, dancers, musicians, designers, architects, research scientists, teachers, artisans, non-profits and more are all invited to participate. Learn more and Sign up at www.ArtCondo.com Contact: artcondo2013@gmail.com

London UK Contemporary Art Gallery Open Call + Artists Submit for Daily Feature

 

The Chiara Williams Contemporary Art Gallery features art tweeted and shared across their social media accounts with the hashtag #CWCArtDaily.  Follow them on Twitter (here: @ChiaraWilliams_ ).

To be considered, please email them with 2 images of your work, together with artwork title, your name and your social media handles (twitter, instagram, facebook).

 It’s free! They share the work of one artist per day. For full submission details click here.

-and-

If you are a UK artist in the Kent area:

AFTERNOON TEA | Works on Paper | OPEN CALL

Calling all KENT-based artists (and Kent borders), and especially encouraging submissions from artists based in MARGATE or THANET!

Chiara Williams Contemporary is hosting a pop-up tea salon and exhibition of works on paper by local artists 8 – 16 July 2017

 as part of Margate Festival.

This event was last held to great acclaim at the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011…read more about the 2017 edition here…

Participation for artists is FREE but your deadline for emailing us to confirm participation is 26 JuneOPEN CALL guidelines can be found here

Feel free to share!

London, UK

Where #photographers Find Abandoned Places + Little Known Locations

 

Summer may be time for exploration, and that means something different to everyone according to their special interests.

Photographers can go behind the scenes with Messy Nessy cabinet of chic curiosities to explore abandoned places around the globe and little known places to find photography gold mines.

Sign up for the newsletter here to get the latest news sent to your inbox.

As Messy Nessy says, ” We’ve found old churches, lighthouses, trains and entire ghost towns, but never before have we come across an old brothel for sale.” View it here.

On the Messy Nessy site you can explore their Off-Beat and Little Known Category here, Inspiration Vault here, and their Nostalgia category here for image resources for your artmaking. These are just a few among the many other categories on this amazingly in-depth site. We especially liked The Wonderful Lost World of Mr Hendy, among many others!

Sign up for the newsletter here today.

Best Online Sales Site for Your Summer Studio Clearance Sale

Vest Singlet Spray Graffiti Casual Artwork Urban Concept

STUDIO CLEARANCE SALES

Many visual artists produce a lot of work in their studios as they develop and grow their art making practice. Soon, there may be a storage problem in their workspace. A time comes–perhaps during the summer months– when artists want to sell off a lot of transitional work. They may need to make more room in their studio and realize that selling off earlier pieces will likely provide additional money for replenishing their art materials and art making supplies.  Or perhaps the artist is planning on relocating to another workspace or renovating their current studio and the prospect of moving years of accumulated and stored artworks is overwhelming–so they would rather sell the art pieces than move them into another storage area. Psychologically, it may be freeing for an artist to sell off older work as they move forward with their style.

There are many reasons for any artist to want to offer certain of their artworks for quick sale outside the gallery system.

Open Studio sales have been underway annually for decades before any online galleries even existed. Open Studios provide a way for artists to sell their art from their studio–the major drawback being that these sales are usually annual or bi-annual and occur only over one weekend. Artists continue to need to sell artworks quickly and easily in ways that do not monopolize blocks of their time–time they could be at work on their art making.

ONLINE YEAR-ROUND STUDIO SALES

If you are an artist and need to make lots of quick art sales, for whatever reason, one site to consider is Chairish. Initially, I was invited to sell on Chairish and as a test I uploaded about a dozen paintings. So far I’ve sold 6 –paintings I needed to sell to create space.  I was glad to sell to buyers on Chairish who appreciate my art. I’m glad to have removed those pieces from storage. It’s nice to know that these artworks are now seeing the light of day and enjoyed by others.

Photography Ideas Creative Occupation Design Studio Concept

 

YOU HAVE WHAT CHAIRISH BUYERS ARE LOOKING FOR

Chairish buyers appreciate high quality design items, collectables, one-of-a-kind artworks, and limited edition pieces. One of my buyers, an Interior Designer, purchased one of my paintings for a client. We were able to have a dialog via messaging on the Chairish site. Other buyers bought my paintings to decorate their homes and apartments. My buyers are also my followers on the Chairish site and receive notifications when I add new work for sale or lower my asking price on any of their favorite artworks.

MULTIPLE ART SHIPPING OPTIONS

I know that shipping is always an issue for artists. Chairish has that covered by offering some helpful services to artists for shipping their art to buyers.

WHITE GLOVE SERVICE

First, Chairish offers White Glove service. If you have a large and valuable artwork selling on Chairish you can choose to use their White Glove service which is paid for by the buyer. With White Glove, Chairish will send art handlers to remove the artwork from your studio and hand-deliver it to your buyer.

PAID BY CHAIRISH

Another useful shipping option an artist can elect to use is the paid by Chairish Pre-paid UPS shipping label option. With this option, a pre-paid shipping label is generated for your sold artwork. Then all you need to do is print the shipping label and apply it to the package containing the artwork. You can then take your package to any UPS shipping center –which may be your local Staples store–where they scan the label and hold the package for pickup the same day. Three days later your art is delivered to your buyer. Within about seven days your payment is in your PayPal account.

Local Hand-Delivery

The 3rd shipping option available on Chairish is for the artist to pay the shipping cost on the item or charge a fee to the buyer. This option allows for you to hand-deliver your sold art piece– within a selected mile radius– for a flat fee. So if you live in a large city, you can offer to bring the art to the buyer’s home, office, or meet-up for coffee and deliver their latest purchase to them personally. Or, perhaps you know someone who will make these deliveries for you while you continue your studio work.

Each item you sell on Chairish can have any one of these shipping options selected and applied. There is no need for consistency of shipping options across your Chairish store, as on other online sales platforms.

PRICING OPTIONS AND BUYER OFFERS

Also, I like the pricing options on Chairish. For each of your artworks offered for sale, you can feature the retail price, your sale price, and add a reserve price for when a buyer makes an offer. These features help to increase your sales. Buyers are always looking for bargains and so having the option to make an offer is very appealing! They are interacting with you when they make you an offer that is a little lower than your asking price. You then have the option of entering a counter-offer or of accepting their offer for your artwork.

Now that I’ve found this viable way to make lots of quick sales I plan to add many more of my paintings to the Chairish site and get them out of storage! This may be a working option for you too.

West Coast’s Wildest, Most-Accomplished, Under-Recognized Contemporary Artists

With the support of ArtShare LA, four seasoned visual artists will receive widespread exposure in the heart of the booming Downtown Los Angeles Arts District.

“We’ve been deeply devoted to the Arts our entire lives. I believe it’s because we’ve chosen unorthodox career paths that we’ve yet to receive significant recognition. We haven’t followed the rules. To a person, we’ve felt compelled, obligated really, to explore the fascinating new mediums / outlets / technologies available to artists today,” says Metrov, the exhibit’s curator and lead artist.

The exhibit title: “EARTH: as erotic energy (stop torturing my mother!)” references outrage at the tearing down of our cherished environmental protections; an absolute denunciation of unbridled corporate pollution of our air, water, and food; disregard for ecocentric values—all in the name of profit and greed. “The old system is dying. We are here to welcome a return to Matriarchal Principles and a harmonious relationship with Nature; to aid the transformation from a fear-based to a love-based civilization.”

The exhibit will feature: Artist Sara Lytle’s revelations from the alt dimension, Metrov’s large-format assemblage works depicting divine-feminine mutations, Henry Rasmussen’s haunting silent heads; hanging, organic mud paintings & sculpture by Mike Mollett, founder of the LA MUDPEOPLE.

Where: Angel City Brewery—Sponsored by ARTSHARE LA
When: June 8 thru July 5, 2017
Artists: Sara Lytle, Metrov, Mike Mollett, Henry Rasmussen
Opening Reception: June 8, 6-9pm

Monochrome Images: Argentinian Photographic Artist Jose Luis Gambande

Orleans 2, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

Although photographic artist Jose Luis Gambande chooses the subjects for his monochrome photographs on his weekly walks in cities he visits–last month he made a huge quantity of photographs on a trip to Spain and France–he does not consider himself a Street Photographer. “Usually I walk and shoot in the city once a week,” says Jose, “I take buildings and cityscapes because I like to register those things that are permanent–always there– around us. I am not a Street Photographer in the sense of taking the city movement, or the street dynamic life. I like the steady things in the city, the landscape of the permanent.”

Paris #2, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

Jose Luis Gambande, enjoys working in digital monochrome, treating each black and white photograph like a unique thing–a unique opportunity to make each image something special.

A LA OFICINA, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

He also loves the discovery process on the streets of cities and during post-processing of this images, stating that — “Frequently, when I begin processing an image taking off colors I discover a new shadow, a new light, a new bright that was never seen when taking the photo.”

 

 

BARRIO, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Jose Luis Gambande was born in Argentina 58 years ago. “I am an electrical engineering and work as that for my living,” says Jose, who is married and has two sons. He recalls how,in his childhood he studied fine arts and enjoyed painting–first, with brushes and paints and lastly digital painting using inkscape software.

 

CARRERA, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Always intrigued by photography but never thought he could make it, Jose only began making photographs six months ago. “I began shooting just for curiosity and found it likes me,” says Jose.

ARBOL, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

As Jose says of his image making philosophy– “By the way, my knowledge of photography techniques is yet very limited. I like to take a good shot (with a good composition) and then make some digital operations (as little as possible) turning the image to a higher level of complexity and impact. I use an image editor. I don’t like to give a “message” with my photos, only an aesthetical representation, and maybe discover a new thing or a new view in a well-known place.”

ESTUDIO 17312, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Jose Luis Gambande offers Limited Edition prints directly from his website here. He is also available for assignments.

Jose has open edition prints available in his Saatchi Online portfolio: https://www.saatchiart.com/gambande
Follow Jose on Instagram here and on Facebook here.

SILLAS Y MESAS, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

We Topped the List of 10 Art Websites Every Artist Should Know

We are very pleased that Artist Marketing Resources is at the top of the list of 10 Art Websites Every Aspiring Artist Should Know–a list put together and published by Creative Founders. Read the list here.

Call to Artists: Submit to the Unauthorized SFMOMA Solo Exhibition Series

 

 

Unauthorized SFMOMA Show is a series of solo exhibitions that will take place within the public spaces of SFMOMA from April 6-July 2 on a rotating basis.

How to exhibit your work–
In order to participate in the exhibition go to the upload form, fill in the form, upload the work and press “Submit.”  All works will be accepted at the moment of their submission and will automatically constitute an Unauthorized SFMOMA Solo Show on view at SFMOMA via http://sfmoma.show.

The period of the exhibition starts when a work is submitted and ends when a new work is submitted. There are NO application or exhibition fees.

Unbound: World’s 1st Crowdfunding Publisher

 

In 2015, we published  our article 50 Crowdfunding Platforms for Artists  which our readers shared to Facebook 89 times and also shared and discussed in several LinkedIn groups. Since then, some of those crowdfunding sites have disappeared and others launched.

A new crowdfunder that may be of interest to artists seeking new ways to fund their practice is called Unbound– the world’s first crowdfunding publisher. They turn your great ideas into books and you can use their platform to fund and publish your print or digital book.

Unbound books is based in London, England, and as they describe on their site– “114,635 people from 170 countries have pledged £3,754,962 to fund 220 projects – and counting – from bestsellers to award-winners.”

Unbound seems to like the fresh new idea, the unconventional–from the successfully funded and published Empire of Booze by Henry Jeffreys, to an anthology on race and identity in contemporary Britain, to a compilation of terrible old video games you’ve never heard of, to the art and artful idea. Perhaps your’s is their next big one.
Find out how Unbound crowdfunding works here.

Jumbo Yarn Bowls Are The Perfect Accent Piece For Yarn Loving Clients!

Mulberry Yarn Project Bowl with Sparkle Inlay

 

Every Interior designer has a list of tried and true questions to help assess the tastes and habits of their client. With the recent resurgence of fiber crafting, you might want to ask “do you knit or crochet”? If the answer is yes, you’ll know your client has a heightened love of textures, fibers and color that might make the design process a bit easier! And, when you finish that project with an Artisan Crafted, Jumbo Yarn Bowl on the coffee table in the living room or next to the easy chair in the den, you’ll have a lovely focal point and a client for life!

XXL Cherry Yarn Project Bowl #993

 

Heckathorn Turned Wood had so many requests for “bigger” Yarn Bowls from their Etsy followers, that Jumbo Wood Yarn Bowls have quickly become Lathe Artist Bob Heckathorn’s singular passion. These oversized, functional collectibles have a different purpose than smaller, (single ball) yarn bowls you’ll find on craft sites.

These Jumbo Yarn Bowls are HUGE –ranging from 10″ – 13″ in diameter; designed to hold several balls of yarn as well as the entire project, tools, etc. when the work is set aside. Discerning yarn fanatics love the organization these Jumbo Yarn Bowls provide, while an Artisan Crafted Art Bowl elevates their current work in progress to a whole new level.

Jumbo Cherry Yarn Project Bowl

 

Months in the making, Heckathorn Turned Wood’s Yarn Project Bowls are created from choice reclaimed hardwoods (Cherry, Kauri, Camphor and Pecan, etc.) as well as segmented pine for more rustic tastes. The slow drying process adds gentle warping and character to the shape of the bowl while occurring natural cracks are filled with Bob’s proprietary jewel inspired sparkling inlay. Every Jumbo Yarn Bowl is hand-sanded, buffed and finished over ten times, resulting in a silky smooth, brilliant gloss finish.

XXXL Segmented Pine Yarn Bowl

If you happen to be designing space for a yarn enthusiast Heckathorn Turned Wood is a special resource for a hand-turned accent piece, direct from the artist. Each Jumbo Yarn Bowl is unique, one-of-a-kind, signed and numbered with species by the artist. Including one of these functional collectibles in the right design project will be a special gift the owner will cherish for years to come. For more on the creative process visit Bob’s blog at HeckathornTurnedWood.com.

 

XXL Cherry Yarn Bowl

 

Find out more on the Heckathorn’s website: HeckathornTurnedWood.com

You can buy these bowls on Etsy here: HeckathornTurnedWood.Etsy.com

Follow Heckathorn Turned Wood on Instagram: Instagram.com/heckathornturnedwood 

Facebook:  facebook.com/HeckathornTurnedWoods

Pinterest:   pinterest.com/pheckathorn/crochet-away

Twitter:  twitter.com/@ptheckathorn

Revitalization of Rhopography in the Oil Paintings of PJ Mills

Watermelon and Christmas lights, oil painting on canvas, 51 x 64, PJ Mills

 

The oil paintings of Miami, Florida based artist PJ Mills present everyday objects such as a toy, spiritual items, food, and personal possessions of the artist, all realistically rendered in still life scenes.  The artwork objects may be contextually placed in a still life setting or within more ambiguous spaces. At first glance this subject matter may seem to have little importance— yet these paintings make viewers take another look at these ordinary items perhaps previously taken for granted. As the artist PJ Mills says,” These paintings focus on those personal possessions that I find curiously engaging.”  And we agree–there is a substantial presence in each of these images. Some of the canvases are as large as 51 x 64 inches and as small as 12 x 12 inches, with each study holding its own as an artwork.

Paper Crane, oil painting on canvas, 48 x 48, PJ Mills

 

Steak, oil painting on canvas, 18 x 18, PJ Mills

 

PJ Mills is art historically connected to the practice of painters of the past in that his painterly examination may represent or symbolize the artist’s ideas or the items may have metaphorical implications. Still life painting of such common everyday objects is often referred to art historically as “rhopography.”  According to The English Oxford Dictionary  the art historical definition of rhopography, is a depiction of subject matter considered insignificant or trivial, as still life, the domestic interior, animals, insects and the like.

 

Rabbit’s Foot and Communion Hosts, oil painting on canvas, 48 x 48, PJ Mills

 

Pinned Beetle, oil painting on canvas, 12 x 12 inches, PJ Mills

 

PJ Mills subjects of interest for his paintings may include the contemporary, such as Polaroid photos, as well as objects present through time such as things that maintain religious or supernatural characteristics– divining rods, masks, or spiritual fetish articles. The artist is also very aware of how a simple juxtaposition of two or more objects will express far more complex meanings.   The juxtaposition of objects arranged by visual artists is similar to how many poets lay down verse. It is not the words per se that contain the power, but the unknown image that arises from what was created by the juxtaposition. Defined as the “imago ignota,” it is the combination of words which elevate them beyond the language of the obvious. “I contend that this holds true for images, as well,” says the artist.

 

Polaroids, oil painting on canvas, 48 x 48, PJ Mills

 

“In the last few years,” says PJ Mills, ” I have started to isolate and focus on personal effects that relate specifically to personal consumption and identity. A woman’s compact may be an aid for the adjustment of lipstick but also holds the secrets of her self-absorption snapped shut in the tidy compartment of her purse. Risque and subjective photographs (Polaroids) may be titillating, they are also quite personal and speak of privacy as well. Jewel like insects, the tiny treasures of boyhood fascination or even the food we eat raise questions of adult obsession with consumerism. Issues of identity and consumerism all stem directly and indirectly from strange as well as obvious places in our lives. These visual investigations of isolated objects and/or juxtapositions of personal effects, represent the seemingly obvious. But also the often enigmatic, and yet always metaphorically pregnant meanings.”

 

Clown & Thorns, oil painting on canvas, 51 x 64, PJ Mills

 

“My approach to painting is highly personal and intuitive. During the creative process I try to think as little as possible about this work and let the subjects surface from my subconscious. The result is quite suggestive by its contents and symbolically loaded with historical references. This material develops from entirely personal experiences and through obsessions I have with objects and my musing regarding the human condition as it relates to identity issues. The personal subjectivity of this work is not a grand philosophical statement. It is instead more closely related to a genre sensibility characteristic of the mundane used as metaphors for larger ideas.”

 

Monster, oil painting on canvas, 48 x 48, PJ Mills

 

“Common Still life painting that was popular in the 17th century Dutch and Flemish often contained hidden allegories such as the Christian Passion, Resurrection or the transience of things in life. They were little paintings with big ideas. The paintings during this time that concerned themselves with life, death and transient events between were often referred to as “Vanitas” paintings. Not in the sense of vainness or conceit; “Vanitas” often a latin term used to describe a notion of evanescence of earthly possessions and the life linked to the work. The meanings in these paintings were conveyed by the use of objects, mostly familiar and everyday items and were given a symbolic connotation. My paintings are similar in the sense that they isolate a particular object or group of objects containing a history of symbolic references. Within the body of my work, historical reference and symbolic references are typically ignored and the object is valued for purely personal reasons. The result often has an element of cognitive dissonance if not absurdity to the reasons behind its selection. I find the confusion intriguing.”

Then the brilliant artist PJ Mills simply sums up his work by stating– “I depart from seventeenth century concepts and slip in contemporary wackiness.”

 

Captive Bolt Pistol & Toy, oil painting, 48 x 48, PJ Mills

 

PJ Mills received his MFA degree in painting from Cornell University and has exhibited in numerous US art galleries. You can view more paintings on the artist’s website here.

Follow the artist PJ Mills on Instagram here.

Visit PJ Mills’ Facebook page here.

 

Wishbone, oil painting on canvas, 12 x 12, PJ Mills

CALL FOR EXHIBITION PROPOSALS for 2018 Season Deadline May 1st

 

 

Honfleur Gallery & Vivid Solutions has a CALL FOR EXHIBITION PROPOSALS for their 2018 season in Honfleur Gallery and Vivid Solutions Gallery.

Applications are due May 1, 2017.

To Apply for Honfleur and Vivid Solutions Gallery artist should submit a portfolio via email by May 1, 2017 that includes the following:
• 5-20 JPEG images and/or videos (3 minutes or less in duration) of relevant work
o Indicate if work will be included in the exhibition, or if images are representative of new work that has yet to be produced
o Label with artist’s name and title of the work (e.g.
FredDouglass_Untitled1.jpeg)
o Optional: Include dimensions, materials, year completed, and other pertinent information in a separate document
• Artist Statement
• Exhibition Description
• Current resume/CV
• Short bio
• Proposal for at least one related program (panel discussion, artist talk, workshop) costing one hundred dollars or less to execute
• Support information (URL of artist’s website or social media, articles, reviews, related press, past projects, etc.)
( If submitting as a curator, please include a list of artist names and Curatorial Statement)

Find full submission details (including email address to send submissions) on the gallery website here and in our e-list of art galleries here.

 

Open Call For National + International Artists’ Exhibition Proposals 2017

 

Ends on January 13, 2018

Submissions for Exhibitions
 Locust Projects is currently running a rolling OPEN CALL for exhibition proposals from national and international visual artists to propose experimental site-specific projects for their 3 exhibition spaces.Read the full submission guidelines here.Find out about more international art gallery submission opportunities here.

Colour: A Kind of Bliss, St Marylebone Crypt

Another great exhibition write-up on Andy Parkinson’s blog Patterns That Connect

patternsthatconnect

I am delighted to have been included in the group exhibition curated by Lucy Cox and Freya Purdue, Colour: A Kind of Bliss, at St Marylebone Crypt from 5 April to 30 June 2017.

Julian Brown, Tattoo Lagoon, 2017, acrylic on linen, 80x100cm

From the Catalogue Introduction, written by Lucy Cox and Freya Purdue…

“Colour is a kind of bliss … like a closing eyelid … a tiny fainting spell.”
 – Roland Barthes

Colour: A Kind of Bliss brings together six British painters concerned with different approaches to the use of intense energy and luminous qualities of colour. Through varying densities of paint and chroma, saturation and de-saturation, their paintings realise direct emotive forms resulting in both subtly and vibrancy. Painting for these artists working in the field of abstraction/non-figuration is a synthesis of ideas, drawing and colour.

In the vast expanding digital world, we have become entranced by momentary…

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Doraelia Ruiz Impresses with her Brave, Bold Solo Show at Brainworks

ART AND CAKE

Doraelia Ruiz “Never Yes No Me You”

Brainworks Gallery

through March 25th

by Genie Davis

Let’s start with a simple wow for Doraelia Ruiz’ “Never Yes No Me You” at Brainworks Gallery. The impressive rainbow of colors, the mix of found images with her own mark making and her use of digital art to combine these elements – this is a mind-bending visual whirl.

Using her merging and melding of a variety of media, Ruiz prints her combined images, stretches them on panels, and then paints over them. This is layering, but it is a delicate layering, her methodology forming an intimate palette to the longing she expresses for what can never be obtained and will never be fully real. The illusions she creates are dreamlike, and in coloration remind the viewer just a bit of the ethos of Peter Max if he did a Vulcan mind-meld with Van Gogh.

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Special International Artist Residency in Southern Mexico SUMMER 2017

 

Arquetopia’s acclaimed flagship residency for artists, curators, art historians, and students. The residency program administrators asked us to share their summer 2017 residency program:

Dear Marie Kazalia and Friends at Artist Marketing Resources:

A warm hello from all of us at Arquetopia Foundation and International Artist Residency in southern Mexico, and thank you for posting our past residency open calls for artists. We hope you are having a great spring so far.

I am writing to ask if you would please include our current open call for ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017, our Special International Summer Program, on your site as the deadline is Sunday, April 2, 2017.

Thank you for your time, interest, and for including our calls. We appreciate your help in getting the word out!

Saludos cordiales,

Chris

Christopher Davis
Clarinetist
Co-Founder, Co-Executive Director and Director of Music Programs

Arquetopia, Foundation for Development
Avenida 15 Poniente 715, Centro Histórico
Puebla, PUE  72000 MEXICO
Tel. (+52) 222 594 77 28

Arquetopia Oaxaca
Calle Morelos 105, Col. Santa Cruz
San Pablo Etla, OAX  68258 MEXICO

www.arquetopia.org
www.facebook.com/Arquetopia

OUR ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAMS
Our Artist-in-Residence Programs offer competitive professional opportunities for emerging and mid-career, national and international artists, designers, curators, art historians, art educators, journalists, writers, and cultural researchers age 25 and over. Our programs are based on a non-exploitative model promoting 
social consciousness. Residents are strongly encouraged to explore various ways of cultural exchange as part of their artistic and/or research goals and to actively engage in critical discussions as part of their residency experience. Understanding Mexico’s context, and specifically Puebla and Oaxaca’s cultural complexity, is key for a successful cultural exchange. We welcome applicants from diverse backgrounds and disciplines who are interested in creating work or inspired by art, elements, techniques or processes specific to Mexico and/or unique to Puebla or Oaxaca.

Arquetopia is distinguished worldwide for its array of unique residency programs with substantial content. In contrast to various property rental schemes, tourist resorts, B&B’s, and sublets elsewhere, our residency spaces function exclusively for productive art professionals, writers, and researchers and include structured, informative programs; a network of collaborative workspaces, institutions, and studios; and individualized project support.

HOW TO APPLY
Visit the Arquetopia website at www.arquetopia.org

Complete and submit the Arquetopia Artist-in-Residence Online Application Form, following the instructions on the web page. Following selection, applicants are notified immediately via e-mail.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 SPECIAL 3-IN-1 INTERNATIONAL SUMMER ACADEMIC PROGRAM Includes Novohispanic Graphic Arts Technique Instruction And Self-Directed Art Production

Program Session Dates: June 5 to July 17, 2017 (6 weeks)

Deadline: Apply Now through Sunday, April 2, 2017

Spaces are limited. Our committee processes all residency applications when they are received vs. after the deadline has passed.

Fee Reduction of USD -$350 for optional full payment within 1 week of selection.

Full Program Itinerary and Schedule of Events Below
http://www.arquetopia.org/our-artist-residencies/arquetopia-summer-2017 

Arquetopia’s flagship residency program: ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 will focus on the relationship between individual art practices and the visual history of violence. How is the discourse of violence institutionalized? How is violence affecting art production systems and influencing art markets? How has violence become an important part of the visual history of Mexico? How is the normalization of violence through aesthetic principles critical to understand intention and representation?

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 Special International Summer Academic Program (with Novohispanic Graphic Arts and Mural Art technique instruction, and self-directed Art Production) is a prestigious 6-week critical program that offers competitive professional opportunities for local and international emerging and mid-career artists, curators, art historians, and students age 23 and over.

This unique program offers critical methodologies to diverse art practices, exploring how violence is constructed through the language of aesthetics. The goal is to provide tools to understand visualities and gestures in art, while identifying institutional trivialization of intention, and representation in visual expression. Through the program, participants will conceptualize their art by engaging their practice in critical discussions. One of the central goals is to contextualize historical and contemporary articulations regarding the language of visual violence. The seminars and tours included in the program will explore the role of aesthetics in the construction of Mexico’s visual history and its categorization in the context of global visual culture. The program will also put into context the role of cultural institutions, such as museums and galleries, in the production of meaning through objects, social relations, and art consumption. Through hands-on workshops in collaboration with the Museum of Art of the Former Convent of Santa Monica, participants will have the opportunity to expand their art practice by exploring the artistic connections between the baroque graphic arts and the Novohispanic mural painting tradition.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 PROGRAM INCLUSIONS
This program includes 27 seminar hours; 9 hours of individual and collective critiques; guided tours and visits to prominent museums in Puebla, independent galleries, and relevant sites. The program also includes a 27-hour hands-on art workshop instructed by a master conservator, exploring the artistic dimensions of the baroque printmaking tradition and Novohispanic mural art techniques. Activities are designed to promote intense creative work and artistic dialogue; therefore, artists are expected to allocate self-directed studio hours as part of their weekly schedule.

Renowned international art historians, artists, and master restorers facilitate the dialogues, individual and collective critiques, seminars, and workshops. Seminars are conducted in English. Workshop instruction is in Spanish or English. Participants produce work in our partnered studio at one of Mexico’s most important art museums, in Puebla’s majestic central historic district.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 FIVE SPECIAL GUEST SCHOLARS AND INSTRUCTORS

Kirsten Pai Buick, Ph.D. specializes in American art, focusing her research on African-American art, the impact of race and gender on the history of art, representations of the American landscape, and the history of women as patrons and collectors of the arts. She has advanced scholarship of the work of numerous African-American artists through publications including the first book-length examination of the life and career of 19th-century sculptor Mary Edmonia Lewis. Buick is a tenured, full professor at the University of New Mexico, where she has taught for more than 15 years. She earned her bachelor’s degree in art history and Italian literature in 1985 from the University of Chicago. She earned her master’s and doctorate degrees in art history from the University of Michigan. Buick has published extensively on African-American art. Her book Child of the Fire: Mary Edmonia Lewis and the Problem of Art History’s Black and Indian Subject was published by Duke University Press, and her second book, In Authenticity: ‘Kara Walker’ and the Eidetics of Racism, is currently in progress. Her published articles include studies on the work of artists including Daniel Coburn, Patrick Nagatani, Joseph Delaney, Aaron Douglas, Horace Pippin, and Kehinde Wiley. Buick has earned numerous academic, professional, and scholarly awards and grants including the Driskell Prize, Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Predoctoral Fellowship, the Charles Gaius Bolin Fellowship at Williams College, CAA Professional Development Fellowship in Art History, Rhoades Foundation Visiting Lectureship, and the UNM University Libraries Faculty Acknowledgement Award.

 

Siamak Delzendeh was born and raised in Tehran. He initiated his artistic career by experimenting with writing and publishing short stories. Later, he moved to Montreal and studied Photography and Art History at Concordia University. He participated in some group and solo exhibitions in Montreal, Toronto and Tehran. After returning home in 2009, Delzendeh published several articles and critiques on visual arts in Tehran. He also exhibited photo installations and other works at Siin, Y(Igreg) and Golestan art galleries. From 2012 to 2014, he was involved in making a documentary series on visual arts. He participated in several research programs in Iran and composed visual art entries for the Subcontinent Encyclopedia and also the Encyclopedia Islamica. In 2015, Delzendeh participated in a critical writers’ exchange residency program between the Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin and the Kooshk Residency in Tehran. He also participated as a panelist in the Eleventh International Conference of Iranian Studies in Vienna in 2016. His most recent book, Pictorial Shifts of the Iranian Visual Art, a Critical Survey (from the Qajar period to the end of Pahlavi era), was published in September 2016 by the Nazar Art Publication in Tehran.
Annette Rodríguez, Ph.D. received her doctorate in American Studies at Brown University in 2016. In 2015, Rodríguez was presented the 18th annual Catherine Prelinger Award by the Coordinating Council for Women in History for her scholarly and professional contributions to women in history, and for educating young women to pursue careers in the historical profession. In July of 2016, Rodríguez was selected as a winner of the Dixon First Amendment Award for her efforts on behalf of students, faculty and staff in New Mexico higher education. She has previously been selected as a National Graduate Fellow by the Law and Society Association, a Latino Museum Studies Program Fellow at the Smithsonian Institute, the George I. Sanchez Fellow at the Center for Southwest Research, and a Graduate Fellow at the Office of the New Mexico State Historian. Rodríguez has acted as an instructor at Brown University, the University of New Mexico, Northern New Mexico College, and Santa Fe Community College. She concentrates her work on perennial racist violences in the United States as communicating events that construct and reinforce ideologies and hierarchies of race, gender, citizenship, and national belonging.
Emmanuel Ortega is a curator and a doctoral candidate in Ibero-American colonial art history at the University of New Mexico. He is an adjunct instructor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Since 2007, he has investigated images of violence in the Novohispanic context. For his master thesis, Ortega investigated images involving public performances organized by the Novohispanic Inquisition. For his Ph.D. dissertation, Ortega researches visual representations of the New Mexico Pueblo peoples in Novohispanic Franciscan martyr paintings. He has contributed several entries for the Khan Academy website and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies online bulletin. He has presented his work in the XXXVI Annual Colloquium of Art History organized by the Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, 2012, the College of Art Association and American Studies Association in 2015. Also, in 2015, Ortega partnered with the Museo de Arte Religioso Ex-Convento de Santa Mónica in Puebla, México to curate two art exhibitions based on recently restored paintings from the museum’s permanent collection.
Francisco Guevara is a visual artist and curator specializing in creating projects using contemporary art to promote Development by designing alternative models of social entrepreneurship for human development. He graduated with the degree of University Expert in Management and Planning of Development Cooperation Projects in the Fields of Education, Science and Culture from the Universidad Nacional de Estudios a Distancia (UNED) in Madrid, Spain, in coordination with the Organization of Latin American States for Education, Science and Culture (OEI). He also received his postgraduate degree in Cultural Management and Communication from the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He joined the Race, Gender and the Historiographies of Art Seminar at the University of New Mexico in 2009 to incorporate into his curatorial projects a broader understanding of identity in the local and international context. His work and projects emphasize the role of contemporary art practices as a tool for social change. His experience covers international projects including: intangible heritage, public art, exhibits and visual arts education. As an artist he has researched, studied and worked exploring the connection between food, rituals of eating and collective identity. He is Co-Founder and Co-Executive Director of Arquetopia Foundation for Development.

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 PROGRAM ITINERARY AND SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Week 1: The first week of the program will serve as an introduction to Arquetopia’s methodologies. We will welcome Sofia Carrillo, curator of Mexico City’s Ex Teresa Arte Actual Museum for a portfolio review of all participants. This week will include self-directed art production hours and an introduction to historical and artistic connections between Novohispanic graphic arts and mural painting traditions. In addition, individual art critique sessions will help participants establish overall goals. The first tour of Mapping the City will focus on ritualized violence.

  • Portfolio review with curator Sofia Carrillo
  • Self-directed art production time (12 hours, approx.)
  • Introduction to Novohispanic Graphic Arts and mural painting traditions (9 hours)
  • Individual art critique
  • Mapping the City: Ritualized Violence

Week 2: The second week will focus on the diversity of art practices, collective critique, and in the assessment of conceptual needs for each individual project. We will welcome Iranian curator and scholar Siamak Delzendeh, who will teach the first seminar exploring the relationship between violence, Modernism, and the construction of national identities to contextualize contemporary art practices. Furthermore, we will be sourcing out materials for production. For this reason, the time allocated for self-directed art production will be increased during this week, allowing participants an exploration of their themes and projects independently. Art instruction is included in the second week, which will place a particular emphasis on Novohispanic Graphic Arts techniques. Lastly, the second Mapping the City tour will focus on violence through visual culture.

  • Seminar with Siamak Delzendeh (9 hours)
  • Self-directed art production time (12 hours, approx.)
  • Novohispanic Graphic Arts Techniques Workshop (9 hours)
  • Collective art critique
  • Mapping the City: Violence through Visual Culture

Week 3: During the third week, we will introduce participants to the complex mural tradition reflecting an amalgam of art techniques that produced a very rich visual culture. Studio hours will increase, allowing artists to explore their themes and projects independently. Art instruction will focus on Novohispanic mural painting techniques, and individual critiques will allow participants to assess their progress. Mapping the City will focus on exploring the Mesoamerican and Novohispanic mural tradition, including Cholula and Casa del Dean. Artists will have the option to share their process in a roundtable as part of Arquetopia’s cultural community outreach programs in collaboration with Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla.

  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Novohispanic Mural Painting Techniques Workshop (9 hours)
  • Individual critique
  • Mapping the City: Exploring the Mural Tradition
  • Community outreach roundtable at BUAP

Week 4: The fourth week will focus on contemporary art case studies as examples of discourse on violence and its normalization in art. We will welcome Dr. Annette Rodríguez, who will teach the second seminar exploring how violence constructs and reinforces ideologies and heirarchies of race, gender, citizenship, and national belonging. Studio hours will continue, while collective critique will serve as feedback for the individual art practices. Mapping the City will focus on Mexico and Puebla’s contemporary art scene, including studio visits and an artist talk.

  • Seminar with Dr. Annette Rodríguez (9 hours)
  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Collective critique
  • Mapping the City: Contemporary Violence

Week 5: For the fifth week, we will welcome art historian Emmanuel Ortega, who will teach a seminar on violence and the stratification of artistic practices. With the main purpose of challenging hierarchies that negatively impact the production of art and art history to this day, the seminar will also focus on the construction of national identity. This seminar also includes guided visits to relevant sites in order to further contextualize colonial art practices. Participants will continue to produce in the studio and have individual critiques. The activities and tours will include baroque architecture and other relevant sites.

  • Seminar with Emmanuel Ortega
  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Individual critique
  • Mapping the City: Violence and National Identity

Week 6: For the sixth and final week, we will welcome art historian Dr. Kirsten Buick, who will teach a master class on the aesthetics of violence and the writing of art history. Through a series of case studies, participants will explore how artists, art historians, critics, and the public construct meaning through objects and how we frame, at various times race, gender, sexuality, and class through visual expression. For the final critique, participants will present the results of their residency and collectively review the diverse processes. A farewell dinner for all ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 participants will be held during this week. Artists will have the option to share their process in a roundtable as part of Arquetopia cultural community outreach programs in collaboration with Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla.

  • Master class with Dr. Kirsten Buick
  • Self-directed art production (18 hours, approx.)
  • Final collective critique
  • Farewell dinner
  • Community outreach roundtable at Ibero

ArquetopiaSUMMER 2017 SPECIAL VENUE
The Museum of Art of the Former Convent of Santa Monica is one of Mexico’s most prominent religious and colonial art museums. Its collections were formed in the 1930s with artwork from the 16th through 17th centuries including some of the greatest artists of the New Spain such as Juan Correa, Miguel Cabrera, Miguel Jerónimo de Zendejas, and Lorenzo Zendejas, among others. The museum also records monastic life in different periods of history, from everyday life to religious rituals.

 

RESIDENCY GUIDELINES

  • Selection decisions are based on artistic work and proposed project. Candidates at all stages of their careers (emerging and established) must demonstrate a clear sense of potential.
  • Our pool of applicants and residents is diverse in all aspects.
  • Our residency programs are competitive opportunities for artists and researchers to pursue their own work, free of pressure (especially work that in their particular circumstances would normally be difficult to produce).
  • Selection priority is given to projects that explore a responsible connection between the applicant’s artistic practice and the cultural context of Mexico, of Puebla, or of Oaxaca. The connection can be as broad as an artistic technique or as specific as a local theme.
  • The creation of community with fellow residents and staff during the residency period is important.

ARQUETOPIA
Founded in 2009, Arquetopia is an internationally established, award-winning nonprofit arts and cultural foundation with a social scope that emphasizes critical thinking through artistic practices. Our Artist-in-Residence Programs are the largest and most reputable in Mexico and Latin America, with an array of contents anchored in a solid structure of collaborations with prominent cultural institutions, renowned experts, and notable artists.

We are invested in approaching art and art history with a critical perspective by understanding Mexico’s complexity in context and incorporating nuances in narratives and interpretation of Mexico’s 3,000-year heritage of visual culture. Since its founding, Arquetopia has raised the bar in the residency field, becoming a reference to every residency program in Mexico and influencing most of them in approaching artmaking with more rigorous practices, critical perspectives, and high standards.

ARQUETOPIA PUEBLA
A spectacular, four-story 1939 Mexican Colonial California-style compound conveniently located in Puebla’s central historic district and close to the Zócalo (city square) accommodates the offices, residency space for up to 12 artists-in-residence, and numerous production spaces of Arquetopia. Recently renovated and expanded, the residency offers a large, natural-light studio; a darkroom; a printmaking studio, a ceramics firing facility with a medium-sized gas kiln; a natural pigments laboratory; ten furnished bedrooms; a large dining room; an open-access kitchen; furnished outdoor terraces and viewing decks; a small botanical garden; a research library; and a rooftop lounge with panoramic views of the city.

 

PUEBLA, SOUTHERN MEXICO
Accessible via two international airports in Puebla (PBC) and Mexico City (MEX), Puebla is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that lies 136 km (84 mi) from Mexico City and has approximately 5,000 colonial buildings. With a population of 2.7 million, Puebla is famous for a deep cultural identity, delicious cuisine, Talavera ceramics, and traditions rooted in the 16th-century baroque and enriched by a blend of five pre-Hispanic/indigenous cultures, Arab, Jewish, French, and Spanish influences. Puebla lies 45 km (28 mi) east of the Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl volcanoes, giving the residents a magnificent view of their snow-topped peaks. At an elevation of 2,200 m (7,200 ft), Puebla features a temperate subtropical highland climate, resulting in an average of only three days per year seeing temperatures above 29°C (84°F). 

RESIDENCY DURATION / TIME PERIOD
Term of 6 weeks. Dates for this program are fixed, from Monday, June 5 to Monday, July 17, 2017.

WHAT THIS RESIDENCY INCLUDES

Staff Support:

  • Each resident meets weekly with our staff for individualized research assistance/resources, project guidance, and critiques
  • Our residencies are process-based; residents are not expected to give talks, exhibitions, or workshops

Accommodation and Meals:

  • Furnished, private bedroom
  • Meals and 24-hour access to the kitchen and dining room
  • Wireless Internet
  • Use of Arquetopias residency spaces including 4th-floor lounge and outdoor terraces
  • Shared bathrooms with modern fixtures and showers
  • Housekeeping

Studio Workspace and Materials:

  • 24-hour access to large and bright, shared art studio with generous natural light
  • Personal workspace with large table and wall space
  • Some tools provided
  • On-site darkroom provided for photographers
  • On-site print studio provided for printmakers
  • On-site ceramics firing facility provided for ceramists
  • Materials and supplies for the instructional course provided
  • Materials and supplies for additional project production not included but available for purchase locally

RESIDENCY DEPOSIT, FEE, AND PAYMENT DEADLINES
Fee: USD $795 per week (USD $4770 total for the 6 weeks).

Payment Deadlines: Deposit of 20% of Residency Fee due within 1 week of selection. Balance of Residency Fee due within 30 days of selection. Fee Reduction of USD -$350 for full payment within 1 week of selection.

 

Arquetopia is committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our diverse local and international community. Arquetopia’s resident artist and staff backgrounds vary in all aspects. As part of Arquetopia’s mission is to promote diversity, Arquetopia actively fights discrimination by offering access to its programs and activities without regard to race, color, gender or gender expression, national origin, age, religion, creed, or sexual orientation.

Arquetopia on the Web: www.arquetopia.org 
Arquetopia on Facebook: www.facebook.com/Arquetopia