Found on Flootie: Bird, Fish,Turtles, Rabbits and More For Animal Lovers

In the Garden, Debbie Hughbanks

In the Garden, Debbie Hughbanks

Skillfully rendered rabbit fur, in Debbie Hughbanks drawing In the Garden is so believable you may find yourself reaching out to touch your computer screen. It’s a work of realism to rival the famed Young Hare (1502) watercolor painting of Albrecht Durer. Artist Debbie Hughbanks specializes in painting the wildlife around her studio in Washington State in the USA. She may have also traveled to the tropics to see the sea turtles, shells glistening wet, in her painting Taking the Plunge.

Taking the Plunge, Debbie Hughbanks

Taking the Plunge, Debbie Hughbanks

In Daniel Smith’s painting Cowbird Companions, a portrait an American bison stares defiantly at us, unperturbed by the Cowbirds resting on his massive shoulders. All are in a symbiotic relationship, with the birds eating insects around the enormous animals. Daniel Smith’s paintings and Giclee prints are represented by Pacific Flyway Gallery.

Cowbird Companion, Daniel Smith

Cowbird Companion, Daniel Smith

Roman Rocco Burgan knows his fish! While most of us might simply see an expressive and lovely rendering of a gold fish pond is his painting below, the artist identifies the breed or strain of goldfish as Bristol Blue Shubunkin and Golden Rudd.

Bristol Blue Shubunkin and Golden Rudd Fish, Roman Rocco Burgan

Bristol Blue Shubunkin and Golden Rudd Fish, Roman Rocco Burgan

You’ll find beautiful animal art in Marcella Rose’s Flootie portfolio here. The artist grew up on a farm and learned to appreciate animals early in life, painting both the domesticated animals such as cows–that may remind you of Andy Warhol’s cows–but also the lesser seen animals of North American such as wild sheep and deer.

Trailblazer, Marcella Rose

Trailblazer, Marcella Rose

Lovely brushwork on the deer’s body brings the fur texture to life.

GRACE, Marcella Rose

GRACE, Marcella Rose

The sweet face of Country Girl a painting by Marcella Rose below.

Country Girl, Marcella Rose

Country Girl, Marcella Rose

Darrell Sullen’s Ladies First is a little bit of a humourous take on this view of two cows and one bull on the river’s edge to drink.

two cows, one bull by river, Darrell Sullens

Ladies First, Darrell Sullens

Bill Werle paints in soothing and muted tones to portray the predatory owl, its white face punctuating the center of the dark canvas ground.

Figment of Your Imagination- Barn Owl, Bill Werle

Figment of Your imagination -Barn Owl, Bill Werle

Here Bill Werle skillfully captures an autumn forest view with a moose crossing a stream in his painting Just Passing Through.

Just Passing Through, Bill Werle

Just Passing Through, Bill Werle

Animal lovers will find these, and many more paintings of animals on the Flootie online gallery site here.

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Mapping Joey Favino’s World of Art

The Other Saint Paul Island, Joey Favino

The Other Saint Paul Island, Joey Favino

Joey Favino is both Cartographer and artist. Cartography is the study and technique of making maps, and maps usually provide precise spatial information about physical locations. But while Joey Favino’s take on painting is based on geography and cartography, he completely divorces landforms from any mapping data, leaving the viewer with only shapes to contemplate, often in repeating patterns.

“Are they representational or abstract? Take your pick,” says the artist.

For his painting titled The Other Saint Paul Island, artist Joey Favino says, “Saint Paul Island is located in the Barents Sea, about 300 miles (450 km) off Alaska. My previous paintings featuring the French island of the same name (in the Indian Ocean) led me to seek an alternate namesake. The stark, harsh beauty of the island and its icy surroundings are portrayed by the “cold” and subdued pallet, with the iridescent background hinting at the icy reflection of a low subarctic sunset.”

New Zealand, Joey Favino

New Zealand, Joey Favino

Artist Joey Favino remembers how he liked to look at maps when he was a little boy and when a sophomore in high school, he says,  “I needed an excuse to spend my lunch period in the nice warm library during upstate New York’s winter, so I claimed that I was there to consult an atlas. Within weeks that was my actual purpose there. I postered my room with maps.”

He likens a good map to a piece of art–“I don’t mean old Renaissance maps with ornate borders and cute drawings taking up space where areas are just unexplored… Y’ever look at a Raven map of Idaho? Okay, it’s an esoteric sort of beauty (remember, a map is just a specialized graph, a reference tool), but mapping seemed to be the best path for me to pursue, both very analytical and numeric AND strictly graphic and holistic.”

Hilo, Joey Favino

Great Salt Lake Hi-Lo, Joey Favino

After earning his B.S. in Cartography, Mr. Favino tried unsuccessfully to start a career in the field–“At the time, operating a stereoscope was the standard toe-in-the-door. That’s problematic for me: I’m blind in one eye.” So, he started doing odd jobs and traveled around the United States. On his travels he engaged in a lot of correspondence–writing letters by hand on paper. “Three times now, a series of well-written letters has gotten me to the other side of the planet to be toured around by a local for a couple of weeks, for nothing more than the cost of airfare (Kazakhstan, South Africa, and Maui), so my wanderlust and my bent for geography have been rather satisfied,” explains Favino.

While in Maui, he watched as a commercial artist of note painted a couple of paintings and decided that he should try his hand at it. Favino says of his painting practice, “It quickly became second nature, and both my innate fascination with geographic forms and my learned way of presenting them, with a little twist of well-traveled perspective (for lack of stereo perspective?), both seem to collaborate in some way in each piece I create.”

Cape Quad Cape Cod, Joey F

Cape Quad Cape Cod, Joey Favino

Favino’s take on Cape Cod’s distinctive shape was to repeat it four times in his painting Cape Quad Cape Cod with swirling blues to represent the deep, cold Atlantic waters in Cape Cod Bay and Buzzard Bay.

For his six-panel piece of Utah’s Great Salt Lake, the various tones and line patterns contrast the shoreline at its lowest recorded water level (in 1963) against its highest (in 1986). Two large and three small islands can be seen, as well as the distinction between Northern and Southern parts of the vast inland sea created by the solid railroad causeway crossing the lake. Almost mimicking one’s perception on the shore, the whole thing shimmers against its desert surroundings.

Pyramid Lake, Joey Favino

Pyramid Lake, Joey Favino

For Pyramid Lake, Favino again chose a repetition of four. Pyramid Lake is an eerie, alkaline or saline lake about forty miles northeast of Reno and which consists mostly of the outflow from Lake Tahoe. In this four-panel work, the artist uses browns to color the lake itself (somewhat resembling the gray-brown of the lake’s water), with fiery reds and pinks between each mirrored pair to symbolise of the stark high-altitude desert surroundings. The green spots of paints is Anejo Island, the largest in the lake.

Ascension, Joey Favino

Ascension, Joey Favino

The small island of Ascension, a British possession in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, repeated five times in Joey Favino’s painting Ascension, as first glance resembles a beautiful flower, but also reminds me of a vintage oyster plate. The green area of each “petal” corresponds to Green Mountain, the only hill tall enough on the otherwise Mars-like island to have a fair amount of rainfall and thick vegetation.

Joey Favino

Joey Favino

Joey Favino’s art is on display through the end of September at THE GRIND coffeehouse in Cedar City, Utah

View Joey Favino’s Flootie portfolio here.

Visit Joey Favino’s website http://www.jfwoa.com

Follow his Blog/Newsletter: http://jfwoa.com/blog/

Feature Article by Marie Kazalia, Artist Marketing Resources http://ArtistMarketingResources.com

 

 

Loretta Jenkins “Wise Beauties” from Birth to Old Age

The Wise Beauties, Loretta Jenkins

The Wise Beauties, Loretta Jenkins

I love the way Loretta Jenkins Wise Beauties, above, peer into the image frame at us so powerfully and with such hard direct gazes!

Over the past 25 years Loretta Jenkins has been working as a professional portrait artist in and around North Idaho and Eastern Washington State and online.  “I have worked at doing portrait commissions in malls, galleries and resorts throughout the area, drawing and painting from life and photographs. I am well known in the local area and my work is included in personal collections throughout the US, Canada and Europe. I have been invited to parties and events numerous times to paint and draw for part of their fun activities,” says Loretta.

Home in North Idaho in 1952, Loretta Jenkins

Home in North Idaho in 1952, Loretta Jenkins

Loretta Jenkins often uses photographs provided by her clients to create unique paintings and drawings of large or single groupings of families. She has used old or vintage photographs and combined them with the new to create unique artworks. In the charcoal drawing above, titled Home in North Idaho in 1952, the artist worked from a family photograph of her brothers and cousins at play at their family log cabin located at Cocoalla, Idaho in the nineteen-fifties. Loretta explains why she is absent from the photo– “I was still a baby, so I wasn’t big enough to be outside playing with the family.” She created this drawing as a gift for her brother.
Motherhood, Loretta Jenkins

Motherhood, Loretta Jenkins

Loretta’s painting Motherhood is available as prints on paper in two sizes–click here for details and pricing.

Learning From Grandpa, Loretta Jenkins

Learning From Grandpa, Loretta Jenkins

Loretta Jenkins artwork above, Learning From Grandpa, was a commissioned watercolor painting.
Innocence, Loretta Jenkins

Innocence, Loretta Jenkins

Her painting of a baby who fell asleep in his high chair is based on a 1950’s photographer of her cousin in infancy own by the artist’s grandmother. The artist added the beautifully rendered dogs for additional interest.
Pueblo Clown, Loretta Jenkins

Pueblo Clown, Loretta Jenkins

Loretta describes her color drawing Pueblo Clown as a friend’s son celebrating with his tribe.
Gossips, Loretta Jenkins

Gossips, Loretta Jenkins

Loretta uses collections of photographs to recreate a special time, place or memory.

 

 

View Loretta Jenkins’ full portfolio here.

Found on Flootie: Urban Scenes and Cityscapes

Last month we featured art Found on Flootie in our blog article here. For August, we’ve found so many great artworks on Flootie that fit the theme of urban cityscapes. These artworks depict images buildings and people in US cities coast to coast, border to border. As well as scenes from such European cities as Amsterdam and Munich, Germany. Then off we go, all the way to Israel, to share some paintings of the city of Jerusalem.

Rememberance, Carolyn Hancock

Remembrance, Carolyn Hancock

We’re starting this image set in Washington D.C. with artist Carolyn Hancock’s scene of the Vietnam War Memorial–titled Remembrance. Click here to find out more about this painting.

The Workshop, Barry Westcott

The Workshop, Barry Westcott

In The Workshop, and 3 O’clock, artist Barry Westcott captures everyday scenes in an unnamed American city, rendered in his photo-realistic style of painting. Find the full details for these paintings on Flootie here.

3 O'Clock, Barry Westcott

3 O’Clock, Barry Westcott

Memories of a favorite Spokane, Washington restaurant Bob’s Chili Parlor, from back in the 1940’s and 50’s, with vintage automobile parked in front, come to life is a brilliant colored pencil creation by Craig Shillam. Click here to view the artist’s Flootie portfolio.

This colored pencil drawing is of an actual restaurant in Spokane, Wa. back in the 1940's and 50's is beautifully framed with conservation matting and framing. The framed size is approx. 32" high x 29 1/4" long.

Bob’s Chili Parlor, Craig Shillam

With Juke Joint, artist Mike Handley takes us inside the club life of a city at night. Find more of his work here.

Juke Joint, Mike Handley

Juke Joint, Mike Handley

Another night scene of neon street lights of the Radio City Music Hall, New York City is a color photograph by Gloria de los Santos. Find her full portfolio of artworks here.

Radio City Music Hall, Gloria de los Santos

Radio City Music Hall, NY, Gloria de los Santos

To the southern border of the USA, these New Mexico scenes, Naco Border Crossing, and,  El Rancho Hotel, give as a different flavor of American life.

Naco Border Crossin, Darrell Sullens

Naco Border Crossing, Darrell Sullens

El Racho Hotel Gallup New Mexico, Darrell Sullens

El Racho Hotel Gallup New Mexico, Darrell Sullens

Along with the artist’s tribute to times gone by and the Ashcan School of American painting, below, and on Flootie here.

Ashcan Revisited, Darrell Sullens

Ashcan Revisited, Darrell Sullens

Off to Europe, with John F. Thamm’s Munich Train Station Wedding Party, and, Marcela Rogel de Pepper’s Rainy Day in Amsterdam.

MUNICH TRAIN STATION-WEDDING PARTY by John F. Thamm

MUNICH TRAIN STATION-WEDDING PARTY by John F. Thamm

Rainy Day in Amsterdam, Marcela Rogel de Pepper

Rainy Day in Amsterdam, Marcela Rogel de Pepper

Irene Dahl’s Two Sides of Jerusalem, and Entry into Old Town are both found in her Flootie portfolio.

Two Sides of Jersulem, Irene Dahl

Two Sides of Jersulem, Irene Dahl

Entry into Old Town, Irene Dahl

Entry into Old Town, Irene Dahl

Find these and many more wonderful artworks on Flootie.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flootie Featured Artist: Combined Realism + Abstraction in Watercolor Paintings by Carol Schmauder

Carnival, Carol Schmauder

Carnival, Carol Schmauder

When you visit Spokane, Washington artist Carol Schmauder’s Flootie page and her website here, you’ll discover that she categorizes her paintings into three series: Traditional Realism, Shattered Realities, and Abstract work. I personally find her artworks strongest when they fall between the cracks of those categories, combining elements of both abstraction and realism, as in Carnival (above) and Unorganized Religion (below).

Unorganized Religion, Carol Schumauder

Unorganized Religion, Carol Schmauder

Even the paintings that Carol categorizes as abstract, contain shattered elements of realism, as in the paintings titled Aligning the Plants, where we clearly see portions of buildings, shrubbery and grass.

Aligning the Planets, Carol Schmauder

Aligning the Planets, Carol Schmauder

While, Emerging From the Storm, may be completely abstract, the title suggests a satellite view of storm clouds swirling over land forms.

Emerging From the Storm, Carol Schmauder

Emerging From the Storm, Carol Schmauder

Her Unorganzied Religion clearly combines church steeples with her watercolor swirls and elements of hard-edge divisions characteristic of her Shattered Realities series.

Unorganized Religion, Carol Schumauder

Unorganized Religion, Carol Schmauder

Even what Carol Schmauder considers traditional realism contain elements of pattern and abstraction, as in the very lovely work titled They Withstood the Test of Time, which the artist describes as a rock formation she encountered while on a picnic on Mount Spokane with her husband and friends.

They Withstood the Teat of Time, Carol Schumacher

They Withstood the Teat of Time, Carol Schmauder

And the most realistic of all the paintings presented here, Ivy Covered, based on a Vancouver Island restaurant–the shadows come to life as Schmauder paints them.

Ivy Covered, Carol Schmauder

Ivy Covered, Carol Schmauder

 

Made in Hungary: Ildikó Kalapács, Featured Flootie Artist of the Week

Made In Hungary, Ildiko K

Made In Hungary, Ildiko Kalapacs

 

Ildikó Kalapács is a Hungarian-American visual artist living in Washington state. Her richly layered works, such as her self-portrait, Made In Hungary, reflect her personal explorations of identity through the cultural diversity of her life experiences, and her interest in body language, gender roles, and the human condition.

Time, Ildiko Ka

Time, Ildiko Kalapacs

In addition to her paintings, Ildiko creates three-dimensional art– mostly ceramic works, with some mixed media and bronze pieces. 
Digital, Ildiko Kalapacs

Digital, Ildiko Kalapacs

Her public art project, The Bearing Public Sculpture Project, in Spokane, Washington, is a life-size bronze sculpture depicting a woman carrying a man in a basket balanced on her head. The man in the basket is holding a military rifle. The work is meant to be a thought-provoking metaphor for the strength of the human spirit under the weight of war. The sculpture has the partial funding of a grant from the Puffin Foundation, but more funding is still needed to complete the project.

View more of Ildiko’s paintings and sculpture in her Flootie portfolio here.
Watch a video interview of Ildikó Kalapács with Dean Cameron, host of Flootie TV, Episode 3:

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