Lost Coast Culture Machine

New arts organization to open in Northern California, USA
Artist Anne Beck and “several cohorts” are opening an artspace
and papermaking facility in Fort Bragg, California.
They are calling the space/enterprise/organization the Lost Coast Culture Machine. There are going to be two exhibition spaces dedicated to concept-based, two-month long group shows, a room dedicated to retail/consignment space (primarily handmade/recycled-reused/sustainable cool items, paper & paper products, zines, books & other multiples), another room dedicated to educational programs, and then a full scale papermaking facility in the back. Anne has written that they are on schedule to open bare-bones April 1st 2010
and plan to grow and develop the space as they go. She will make available their floor & site plans to give you an idea of the building and location–send an email request. The web presence for Lost Coast Culture Machine is being developed and  should be available for viewing soon.
Lost Coast Culture Machine will have open submission policies for both the exhibitions program & the retail/consignment space which will be outlined on the aforementioned soon-to-come website. In the meantime, they are putting feelers out to those we know to begin the programming and stocking process. If you have work you’d like to show, design, books, etc. you’d like to consign, please send images or links to info@lostcoastculturemachine.org.
They look forward to seeing great stuff! Please pass this along to anyone you think may be interested.
Thanks kindly,
Anne
anne beck
Advertisements

Art Call–the Book About Death continues

 

We are asking individual artists to submit works, either a single card or a group of cards for exhibition at MUBE. A deadline of January 30, 2010 has been set for reception of all submissions, although we will install any cards received after that date. Digital works are not accepted, sorry. To be included in this exhibition, make a postcard on the theme of death and send it to:
MUBE – Museu Brasileiro da Escultura
Avenida Europa, 218 – Jardim Europa
CEP 01449 000 – São Paulo – Brasil
All works submitted to MUBE will become a part of the permanent collection of the Museum, and will not be returned.
Thank you,
Angela Ferrara (atelierferrara@gmail.com)
Thank you,
Matthew Rose – Paris, France
http://homepage.mac.com /mistahcoughdrop/
http://abookaboutdeath.blogspot.com/

 

 

Meet painter Marie Kazalia

On Tuesday my artist feature appeared on the b-uncut gallery blog–w/pics.

http://b-uncut.com/blog

Since it was two days ago, now you have to scroll down the page a bit to find it.

Here is the direct link:

http://bit.ly/VDCgb

Please take a look and help me promote by RETWEETING (via button at top of article) or posting to your Facebook page…

thanks/LUV

Best wishes for a productive day


publications made by artists

Printed Matter, the world’s largest nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion of publications made by artists, presents the fourth annual NY Art Book Fair, October 2-4 at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, Queens. The Fair will host over 150 international presses, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, and independent artist/publishers presenting a diverse range of the very best in contemporary art publications.

Printed Matter will also host a special exhibition of books, posters, and ephemera byRichard Prince, as well as screenings, book signings, and performances. Other events include the Contemporary Artists’ Books Conference, cosponsored with the Art Libraries Society of New York (ARLIS/NY).

The Fair will open for preview October 1, 6-8 PM at P.S.1. Following the preview, Deitch Studios, Long Island City will generously host an evening of exciting performances to benefit Printed Matter. Tickets begin at $20 and include limited artist editions.

The NY Art Book Fair is free and open to the public. For more information please visitwww.nyartbookfair.com.

P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center is located at 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY.

Printed Matter, Inc. is an independent 501(c)3 nonprofit organization founded in 1976 by artists and art workers with the mission to foster the appreciation, dissemination, and understanding of artists’ books and other artists’ publications.

Printed Matter, Inc. has received support, in part, through grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation, The Cowles Charitable Trust, the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, the Erste Foundation, The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, The Gesso Foundation, The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, Tekserve, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and individuals worldwide.


Printed Matter, Inc.
195 Tenth Avenue
New York, NY 10011
www.printedmatter.org

T: 212 925 0325
F: 212 925 0464

Send postcards…

I have a stack of 500 postcards on my desk–minus several I have mailed out so far, to mail artists and art lovers in the USA, UK, Italy and Germany. My 500 postcards each have a color image on the front, of  my painting titled Splash. I hand-write a note on the back below where my name and blog link are printed.

Postcards are back. Could this revival be a reaction to our prodigious emailing and txt msging? Very possibly. Postcards need to be chosen – a large part of the fun – handwritten and dropped into an old-fashioned letter box with a stamp in place. That itself demands a special trip to a Post Office. Postcards demand that bit more effort from the sender than texting, which is partly why they are fun to receive. They’re also one of the very few forms of handwritten correspondence put out in the mail these days.

It’s easy to have your own postcards printed, and use them to promote yourself as an artist. I used the Modern Postcard  company to print my 500 postcards. I emailed my image to Modern Postcard, paid my bill, and the cards were delivered to my door.

After researching local galleries, I selected a few to receive one of my postcards (with my link on the back). The reason? An email may easily be deleted, but a postcard in the hand is hard to ignore.