London UK Contemporary Art Gallery Open Call + Artists Submit for Daily Feature

 

The Chiara Williams Contemporary Art Gallery features art tweeted and shared across their social media accounts with the hashtag #CWCArtDaily.  Follow them on Twitter (here: @ChiaraWilliams_ ).

To be considered, please email them with 2 images of your work, together with artwork title, your name and your social media handles (twitter, instagram, facebook).

 It’s free! They share the work of one artist per day. For full submission details click here.

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If you are a UK artist in the Kent area:

AFTERNOON TEA | Works on Paper | OPEN CALL

Calling all KENT-based artists (and Kent borders), and especially encouraging submissions from artists based in MARGATE or THANET!

Chiara Williams Contemporary is hosting a pop-up tea salon and exhibition of works on paper by local artists 8 – 16 July 2017

 as part of Margate Festival.

This event was last held to great acclaim at the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011…read more about the 2017 edition here…

Participation for artists is FREE but your deadline for emailing us to confirm participation is 26 JuneOPEN CALL guidelines can be found here

Feel free to share!

London, UK
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Plans for Promoting Your Art in the New Year

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Maybe you’re feeling a bit rusty after taking time off during the holiday season and now you’re eager to reset and restarted in the new year with new ideas and new plans for your art. Many people have mixed feelings right now–during the first week or two of a new year–and you may too. Some may feel eager and optimistic, even wistfully hopeful for the months ahead, while others tend to be more earth-bound in their expectations.

Right now could be a good time for a reality check and a little tough love, especially when it comes to where and how best to place your efforts when it comes to promoting your art.

Here are some thoughts on getting off to a good start in 2017!

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So you want more visibility for your work in 2017! Great goal! How do you spend your time wisely to reach your goals?

While, yes, there are plenty of art magazines and blogs that will feature your work at no cost,  do you really know how and where to find all the best opportunities for your work? And, by the way, what is the best way to show your art to magazine editors? How many art galleries accepting submissions could you find on your own and how long would it take you and at what cost? What valuable opportunities are you missing out on in the meantime?

Plan to use your money and time wisely and effectively in 2017 

The internet has powerful search tools that cost you little more than your time, the cost of a computer, and the price of an internet connection. But, is spending hours and hours of your time searching online wearing you down and discouraging you? It can get pretty dull day after day, and confusing–just how do you organize what you’ve found?

The True Costs

Have you really calculated how much an hour of your time is worth and then multiplied your hourly worth and expenses by the total number of hours spent searching? Wouldn’t you rather be spending your time making more art and getting it out to the best opportunities as quickly as possible? Also the time you spend searching online may be time better spent developing your pitch and actually getting your CV, Artist Statement and artwork images out to be viewed and reviewed.

And how about your jpeg images — are they professionally labeled for submissions? That alone can take hours of your time.

We’ve understood all of these things for a very long time! Artist Marketing Resources recently celebrated its 8 year anniversary providing artists with information resources and opportunities. That’s right, we’ve spent the past eight years compiling valuable resources for artists, working with artists, and helping artists understand how best to present their work.

Now here’s where the reality check and tough love come in.

Why do what others have already done and are making available to you?

If you really think that you can go online and find hundreds and even thousands of opportunities for your art in an afternoon or two of online searching then you are just not being realistic. You couldn’t get that accomplished in weeks or months even. You may not be spending your time productively. You may be caught up in what is known as busy work. You work hard every day but you are just not sure that you are engaged in the right efforts to reach your goals. By not calculating your true cost in time and total long-term expenses you may be spending your time, energy, and resources where they are least effective. How many valuable opportunities are you missing out on while placing your efforts in the wrong place at the wrong time?

Don’t re-do thousands of hours!

We’ve already spent thousands of hours doing the research for you and we want to share that information, to help you. We want you to put your valuable time and other resources toward your creative work. We’ve already spent thousands of hours organizing resources to help you cut back on your expenses. Don’t repeat our efforts!

Calculate Your True Costs

Realistically, why not calculate what an hour of your time is worth–give yourself  an hourly salary amount of $25-35, and add your hourly internet connection cost + the cost of computer use + overhead + utilities. That’s how any business calculates their expenses.

( If you are not familiar with the term overhead–it’s just that–how much does it cost for you to use the space, or to have the roof over your head,  while you use your computer and do your research? That includes calculating the square footage of your office space, and the corresponding  percentage amount of your rent or mortgage payment, insurance, property taxes, utilities, furniture, equipment and any other expense involved for you to use that space.)

If you can immediately cut those expenses and research time down to a fraction, wouldn’t you do that?

That’s what we are offering you.

We’re sharing thousands of hours of research at a fraction of the cost of to you and at a fraction of what others would charge if they had our resources.  Yes, we’ve been told that an e-list sold by others for $150 only contains listings for art galleries in one country–Italy.

Our e-list of art galleries is a fraction of the price and contains extensive galleries listings within all 50 states in the US and extensive listings of art galleries in countries Internationally. Plus our e-list resource contains gallery submission guidelines and policies–highlighted in red so they are easy to find. Our art gallery e-list consists of over 560 pages and approximately 10, 000 art gallery listings.

We also offer an extensive resource e-list of art licensing companies and their submission guidelines, a resource e-list of art magazines and publishers, other of our resource e-lists feature print sales opportunities, photography agents and sales venues, and another on art consultants. And if you need help with your submissions we have an ebook guide, and offer one-on-one services.

Again the question we asked at the outset–How many art galleries accepting submissions could you find on your own and how long would it take you and at what cost? What valuable opportunities are you missing out on in the meantime? Plan to use your money and time wisely and effectively in 2017 by letting us help you.

 

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If you’d like to contact use, please use this form:

Open Call for National / International Artists and Other Opportunities

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Blue Star Contemporary Art Center in San Antonio, Texas has several gallery spaces , project spaces, and arts programs.

Blue Star Contemporary will have an Open Call in January 2017 for 4 artists for their 3 month Berlin Residency –find details here. They are also exhibiting artists, now and into 2019, in a major city airport–find out more here.

The Blue Star Contemporary open call for National & International Artists invites you to submit a portfolio of your work to be considered for exhibition opportunities–the next call will open in the Spring of 2017.  Blue Star exhibitions are curated from the pool of the top 10% of artists who submit their work.

To find out more about the many programs of Blue Star Contemporary Art Center click here.

Blue Star Open Call Opportunities for Artists here.

Submission Guidelines here.

Plan ahead in 2017. Keep up with thousands of opportunities in our International Art Gallery Directory e-list. In this e-list we’ve color highlighted art galleries accepting submissions and have added their submission guidelines and links to their guidelines for artists to review. If you are an artist you can quickly locate more opportunities for their art in the International Art Gallery Directory e-list available here and here.

Artists Switch From Labeling Their Paintings Acrylic To *Synthetic Polymer*

English: THAHLES, 2006. Corday. Synthetic Poly...

English: THAHLES, 2006. Corday. Synthetic Polymer and Pigment on raw linen. 72 x 216in. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I wrote and published this article in June of 2012, yet artists are still commenting on it.

Featured it again in 2015, and for a 3rd time October 2016.  Here’s the original article–

I don’t know all the reasons for acrylic shame, but I do know that many galleries and artists have long labeled acrylic paintings as *mixed media* to help increase sales. I’ve also heard stories of art collectors losing interest and walking away from a painting once they learned it was painted with acrylic paints.

Lately, I have noticed a new trend–contemporary artists are labeling their paintings *synthetic polymer* paintings rather than use the dreaded word *acrylic* to describe their work.

I’m thinking of doing the same. Synthetic polymer does sound more advanced, up-to-the-minute, complex. Perhaps *synthetic polymer* as a medium is actually more accurate a description, since *acrylic* does come in many forms other than paint. There are acrylic nails, acrylic fish tanks, acrylic comes in sheets, there are acrylic fibers, and acrylic acids. Just using the word *acrylic* alone in a line description assumes that the reader/viewer of your work will know that refers to artist acrylic paints. As contemporary artists continue to expand the materials they work with it may just be necessary to use *synthetic polymer* to describe the paint used, for accuracy and clarity. What do you think? Are you willing to drop the use of the term *acrylic painting* and start describing your paintings at *synthetic polymer paintings*? If so, why? For more accurate descriptions? Hope to increase sales? Please leave a comment below.

Featured Post in the Art Category on Niume

My article published on Niume is now featured  in the Art category and they’ve given me a gold badge for one week–which means the articles I publish on the platform this week will receive some extra attention.

If you have powerful work that’s not getting enough visibility, then follow me on Niume here and send me a message with a link to your site where I can view your art.

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THE SAGA OF NU by Metrov: EXPLORE THE “NU” SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

THE SAGA OF NU by Metrovwww.DoYouNU.com

Researching megastar artist, Takashi Murakami, I learned he first made millions from his business, Kaikaikiki, a commercial art production company. He was able to use this money to create larger scale works for the Fine Art arena. Similarly, Jeff Koons became a Wall Street broker to earn the money to finance his early works. This strategy of creating multiple income streams to survive and prosper as an artist applies not only to superstars, but to us every day creators as well.

I set out to produce what I call a “Commercial Fine Art” product… something I could readily manufacture in small quantities on my own in order to get the ball rolling; something, however, that could eventually sell in volume to develop a substantial revenue stream; something that would be a fit for high-end gift shops, department stores, and other outlets. In the past, this would have been frowned upon in the Fine Art World. Now it is not only acceptable, but expected. I spent the last several years trying a variety of ideas and experimenting with all the materials (traditional and new) I could lay my hands on. The road was rockier than expected.

Among the first products I developed were 3D acrylic works. I had my own designs and artwork printed on clear, Plexiglas panels, then used stand-offs to arrange them two or three panels deep.

"3D Tara Goddess Supreme with Pink Dots." (2015) Three layers of acrylic art held apart by brushed nickel stand-offs mounted to a wall; 36" x 52"

“3D Tara Goddess Supreme with Pink Dots.” (2015)
Three layers of acrylic art held apart by brushed nickel stand-offs mounted to a wall; 36″ x 52″

 

I also layered translucent, acrylic artwork inside shadow boxes, and as free-standing pieces, edge-lit with LED strip lighting.

 

"3D Tara Goddess Lightbox-Dot Gate" (2014) Three layers of acrylic art in black wooden box, edge-lit by adjustable LED lighting.

“3D Tara Goddess Lightbox-Dot Gate” (2014)
Three layers of acrylic art in black wooden box, edge-lit by adjustable LED lighting.

 

The results were often lovely, but acrylic prints are quirky and don’t always end up looking the way they are visualized in Photoshop, particularly when employing translucent effects and adding LED edge lighting (fyi, some acrylic sheets distribute the edge lighting evenly, some do not). And if the visual effect doesn’t work, guess what… the printed acrylic sheets are a bust, meaning money down the drain. But the biggest challenge was working with the acrylic itself. Without precision manufacturing equipment, it’s difficult to cut or drill, and often breaks where it should not. Additionally, cutting acrylic makes a huge mess… dust goes everywhere. My studio was not the ideal place to construct these pieces. I’d need a full-blown factory style workshop. Back to the drawing board.

I decided to see if I could reasonably produce one of my 3D models. I’d been creating sculptures in “Blender,” a free, open source, 3D modeling/animation software that’s equivalent to its professional counterparts costing many thousands of dollars. Not an easy learning curve, but very rewarding once you figure it out. (It only took me about five years, off and on, but that was learning on my own via Youtube tutorials.) The awesome thing about creating digital-based sculpture is that I can email the computer file to a foundry in China where they will 3D print it any size, and from that 3D print, form a mold. And from that, the work can be cast in a wide range of materials.

I’d created a character called “NU,” deceptively naïve, even cartoon-like in appearance, but part of a much larger installation series, “MYTH OF PAX: BEAR GODDESS,” 

which is very much on the frontiers of cutting edge fine art. Previously, I’d ordered the first casting as a nine inch, stainless steel sculpture. The results were magnificent, but costly. The stainless steel version of NU would have to retail at around $6,000.00, not exactly commercial department store faire.

 

Metrov with first stainless steel “NU”

Metrov with first stainless steel “NU”

At any rate, I decided NU would be my first “Commercial Fine Art” product, as it seems to have the “cute” factor going for it, and everyone loves “cute.”

So, how to produce the Commercial Fine Art version of NU? I began to experiment with materials and processes… wood, clay, metal, concrete, cardboard, Styrofoam, and more. Because of his unique shapes, NU would be difficult to make using any of these materials. Either that, or the materials just wouldn’t work at all. For example, I thought ceramic was surely the answer. After experimenting with various, slipcasting prototypes, I found out my design would not hold up in the “firing” process. I won’t go into detail about all the different things I tried, but when you’re researching, and ordering stuff, and waiting for it to arrive, and then finding time to actually assemble your ideas, time passes quickly… in this case, R&D, including the acrylic works, took years.

At last, I discovered “Ponoko,” a company that can cut out small designs from a variety of materials using a standard laser cutting technique. A lot of artists use Ponoko to produce jewelry and small figurines. Ponoko also does 3D printing, but sadly 3D printing is not yet ready for prime time—you end up with a rough, gritty surface. It also gets quite expensive. For example, I would have loved to have small NUs 3D printed in a metal like stainless steel or bronze, but the cost was in the thousands for a single 5” inch high figure.

However, laser cutting, which employs a 2D design format (even something as simple as an Illustrator .eps file), is far more cost-effective. I placed my first order for a 4” NU. The results were promising. Laser cutting is precise, and I was able to order ten figures cut from bamboo for around $200. So cost, not including my labor to finish, is around $20 each. And these days Fine Art Toys are selling anywhere between $150-250 bucks (and that’s for mass-produced, injection mold figures which are never touched by the artist’s hands). I also wanted something a little fancier than just a cut-out. Laser cutting can also make engraved areas which allowed me to have inlays made from a different material. This was getting exciting now. I really wanted the inlay pieces to be made from some kind of metal. Alas, Ponoko can’t laser cut metal. I reluctantly settled for black plastic in my excitement to get something finished.

I decided to “distress” the wooden bodies so they had an antique look. I also had to glue feet on because the cut-outs (only 1/4” thick) won’t stand on their own. After staining the wood, I glued the plastic inlay parts on by hand. I thought I’d done it, at lasta product I could reasonably produce on my own without a lot of initial headache and expenditure. (Injection molding runs around $20-30k for a minimum run.)

 

Early NU’s—waiting for the stain to dry. Note the engraved areas where inlays will be inserted.

Early NU’s—waiting for the stain to dry. Note the engraved areas where inlays will be inserted.

One of my plans for these figurines is to send them as gifts to gallery owners in New York and Los Angeles. After a couple of weeks, I realized, no matter how cute, I couldn’t send a hand-finished figurine that used plastic. Damn! I really wanted those metal inlays. Back to research. Fortunately, I found a company called “Pololu,” similar to Ponoko, but they laser cut metal! I ordered another batch of wooden figures with thin steel inlay parts. They arrived… and everything was magnificent, perfect, beyond my expectations. Still, I had to distress the wood, stain the metal, and glue everything together, but the parts fit together perfectly.

Meanwhile, during all this R & D, I was also researching the best gift packaging materials… another grueling excursion into the unknown. After looking at literally thousands of styles of gift boxes and stuffing materials, I finally found the perfect one—and this is big—one that was the perfect dimensions. AND I was able to order them in small quantities whereas most companies have minimum orders of hundreds. After years of sweat and failures, the NU Fine Art Figurine was ready at last.

 

Frame #23 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

Frame #23 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

 

 Next: How to sell NUs? I knew I wanted to eventually sell the figurines in large quantities… that’s where the real income would beincome potentially large enough to support my household, studio operations, and my more ambitious fine art projects. I knew you could submit products to high-end retail chains like “Restoration Hardware” and others. I also figured I could put them into museum and other gift shops. Still, it would be an “iffy” proposition. What if, after all that work, they didn’t sell? Unacceptable.

Because of my background writing film and novels, it occurred to me I might craft a kind of graphic novel using still images. I thought if I could capture the attention of my target audience, and get them emotionally involved with NU, they would help me spread the word. I could also have NU contests and give some away free. I decided to go this route… and I would not even hint at selling anything… not until my customers were hooked.

Crafting a compelling story using small still frames means you have to come up with a very succinct way of writing. You must convey as much as possible in one or two short phrases. Not to mention, of course, your visuals better be pretty damned exciting. I love taking photographs, especially of natural beauty, and have done so in my travels for many years, so I have a large archive of images I could use as backgrounds. I also had experience combining digital characters with real photos (sort of like the FX process used in LORD OF THE RINGS.)

 

Frame #37 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

Frame #37 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

I put “selling” aside, and got to work writing the SAGA OF NU. From my past experience in online marketing, I knew that it can typically take three years for something to catch on with a target audience. I also knew that “marketing” was something you’d have to keep doing for a long time, conceivably for the rest of your life if you’re talking about your art. So you’d better be marketing something you’re really passionate about; it had better be your Primary Mission in Lifethe Reason You’re On This Planetif you’re going to stick with it. Otherwise, you’re gonna burn out on the process, something I’d also experienced in the past.

I decided to start writing without a detailed outline… I wanted the story to be spontaneous. Early on, I realized NU could be a champion for things that are dear to my heart… socio-political causes which, fortunately, are embraced by the Art World. The Creature NU, quickly became an advocate for the environment, sustainability, love vs fear, the value of Living in the Now, and my vision of reinstating dignity and integrity to the Human Race (as opposed to the superficial, sickness-ridden, Market Society that is now the Mainstream).

Like the character, the SAGA OF NU starts off seemingly childlike and innocent. But the tale gradually grows darker and more surreal. NU himself falls victim to the allure of materialism. He will forget his ideals, succumb to greed, and eventually get a terrible, but common disease. It’s not until he almost dies, that he has an epiphany and evolves into the true hero he is meant to be.

So that’s where we are today. Fortunately, the Creature NU is gaining momentum on Instagram with over 35k followers at the time of this writing. The hub for the NU Project is www.DoYouNU.com where you can see the NU video, as well as visit the Instagram graphic novel and the NU Gear Etsy store. If you like NU, and share his ideals, then your support would be much appreciated. Follow NU, and invite your friends to do the same. As we all know, the artist who thrives off his art is the artist who establishes multiple revenue streams. This is true even for the fortunate few who have top tier gallery and museum representation. Whether I can sell figurines in the thousands, even millions, remains to be seen. But I sure plan to give him my best shot. (Move over Murakami!) I’ll start off with a Special Limited Edition until enough financing comes in for mass-produced versions.

Wish me luck, folks. I hope you find this story inspirational for your own creative endeavors in supporting your Art. Be Positive, Confident, and Never Give Up! And perhaps most importantly… HAVE FUN!

“NU—Vintage Series” Special Limited Edition 1500; wood and stained steel; 5” high—now available at Etsy! Gift wrapped with Hang Tag (also included on cards: Legend & Certificate of Ownership)

“NU—Vintage Series” Special Limited Edition 1500; wood and stained steel; 5” high—now available at Etsy!
Gift wrapped with Hang Tag (also included on cards: Legend & Certificate of Ownership)

     

Now an international symbol of Sustainability, the Creature
without compromising ours.

DOWNLOAD THE NU LOGO

INTERNATIONAL SYMBOL OF SUSTAINABILITY

Do You NU?


From the lineage of the great Gregory Gillespie, Metrov has been impacting the Fine Arts for over 35 years. His work resides in collections around the world, including those of celebrities like Mick Jagger, the Hemingways, and Academy Award winner, Robert Zemeckis. He is also an author, filmmaker, and environmental advocate who lives in Southern California.

Please watch the video on www.DoYouNU.com. We can use your Youtube “views.” Any comments on the Youtube video would also be much appreciated! To leave a comment just click the Youtube icon under the video. Thanks”

This Coming Fall Season Are Artists Connecting With Art Consultants or Gallerists Most?

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For the past several years, our extensive e-list of Art Galleries all over world has been our top resource that artists want most all year-long. As this Fall Season comes near, we’ve noticed that it’s our e-list of Art Consultants that artists and arts professionals seem to be getting most often. You can buy either the International Art Gallery e-list or Art Consultants Directory, or both, in our webstore here and Gumroad store here.

We received an unsolicited email from one of the recent buyers of the Art Consultants resource e-list that was sent to us less than 24 hours after she made her purchase.

After Raven Deel purchased the Directory of Art Consultants e-list she wrote to us in an email:

Hi Marie,

It did come through and I have already received 1 client in Texas from sending emails from this file. Thank you. You have done great work in the time and research in building this resource for artists. And you can quote me as saving that.

Best wishes, Raven

You can get ready for the Fall Season marketing and promotions of your art with the International Art Gallery e-list or Art Consultants Directory, or get both, in our webstore here and Gumroad store here.

 

If you’d like us to review of your work and make suggestions, send your goals and the link to your website in an email to:  MarieKazalia@gmail.com

 

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

#Artists Looking For A Lower Cost Print-On-Demand Option For Your Self-Published Art Books?

Screenshot 2016-06-11 at 7.43.41 AM

 

Artists, photographers, writers and creative people working in every genre have been self-publishing print books of their work for a very long time. For several years now, many artists have used the print-on-demand services of such sites as Blurb, Lulu, and others.

Lately, there is another option gaining attention. I recently learned from the fine art photography community that many who option to self-publish a collection of their work in printed book form are now opting to use Docu-copies as a new low-cost option.

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They ship free in the USA.

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Art Premium Magazine: Contemporary AFRICAN ART Issue

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I snapped a shot of Art Premium magazine when my complimentary copy arrived in the mail from France yesterday. Inside their Contemporary African Art Issue is an artist I featured last year!

Just goes to show you that getting featured in a blog article can be a stepping stone! If you are an artist and willing to make a donation I’ll feature your work in an article that will drive lots of visitors to your website.

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Jill Krasner’s Paintings Featured on 8 Pages of June 2016 Watercolor Artist Magazine

June 2016, Watercolor Artist, 8-page feature article of Jill Krasner’s paintings. View more paintings on Jill Krasner’s website here.

Precipice, painting by JIll Krasner, 22 x 30 inches

Precipice, painting by Jill Krasner, 22 x 30 inches

How Artist Metrov Creates His 3D Printed Bronze Sculpture: Reincarnation of Pax

This week, we congratulated Santa Barbara, California artist Metrov on the sale of one of his 3D printed sculptures here. We are very pleased to be able to also share this article, sent to us by Metrov, containing full details on how he created his limited edition sculpture series using the latest 3D printing technology.

3Dmodel

The Reincarnation of PAX by Metrov (www.metrov.org)

The introduction of new casting technologies led me on quite an adventure this last year. Basically, it was supposed to go something like this: 1) Use a 3D modeling program to create a digital sculpture. 2) Email the digital file to a foundry. 3) Foundry makes a 3D print. 4) From the 3D print, they make a mold. 5) From the mold, they cast the sculpture in bronze. 6) Add patinas to bronze. 7) The bronze is mounted on a marble stand. 8) Foundry ships finished piece to my studio in U.S. The real adventure, however, happened between the lines.

STEP ONE: CREATE 3D MODEL

Below: image of PAX: BEAR GODDESS (with foundry notes), rendered from Blender, an open source, 3D modeling and animation program. It took me a few years to master Blender… the basics, anyway. It’s a fully comprehensive program which includes all the myriad controls of the high-end paid versions.

STEP TWO: EMAIL DIGITAL FILE TO FOUNDRY

Sounds simple, but first I had to hire a professional 3D modeller to prepare my digital file for 3D printing. Besides modeling the figure, it has to be specially configured to enable 3D printing—technical stuff I’ve yet to learn (read: don’t want to learn… ugh). Also, the file had to go to a foundry in China as their prices are a fraction of what the cost would be in the U.S. Some places in China are not email friendly, and so emails have to be sent through special servers, otherwise they may be intercepted by secret police… or spies… or something. Anyway, the email finally arrived at the foundry.

STEP THREE: FOUNDRY MAKES 3D PRINT

This step was happily straightforward. My well-prepared file printed without issues. Below: image of the 3D print.

3dprint

STEP FOUR: FOUNDRY MAKES MOLD

Again, this step was pretty straightforward. Or at least, I didn’t hear of any issues.

STEP FIVE: CAST SCULPTURE IN BRONZE

Casting went well… after all, this is what foundries, do, right?

STEP SIX: ADD PATINAS TO BRONZE

This is where the headaches began. This particular sculpture requires a two-tone patina as seen in the first rendering above. Most of the patina is the traditional bronze color that covers the body and ears, but the head and ear holes must be black. After numerous attempts (and photos back and forth showing wear corrections must be made, etc), the artisans at the foundry were simply unable to create the patina as indicated. When they tried to fix it, they only made things worse. Exasperated, I finally instructed them to remove the patina completely and send it without a finish. (see 3rd shot below).

Head_2up

flub2

clean

STEP SEVEN: MOUNT BRONZE ON MARBLE STAND

The first marble base made by the foundry was nothing like the one I designed in my rendering. When I pointed this out to them (based on the photo they sent), they readily had another one made. Second time they got it right.

STEP EIGHT: SHIP FINISHED PIECE

The work in the image above is what arrived from China. I was pretty excited to receive my sculpture at last… it took almost eight months from the time I’d emailed the 3D digital file to get the final statue. It wouldn’t normally take this long, of course, but the patina phase became a nightmare that no one anticipated. It was my fault, actually, as I failed, in the beginning, to ask the foundry to show me a similar two-tone patina sculpture they’d done in the past.

So, I now had to have the patina applied. Since this part of the operation requires a welding torch, and because I’d never applied patina before, I went to a local foundry to have it done.

The local foundry is well established: Artisan Bronze in Oxnard, California. Because of the headaches working with China, I decided to have a mold made from the bronze so I could have Artisan Bronze make copies in the future. Because the 3D print is not required to make bronze copies, the cost is considerably reduced. Robert, the owner, agreed, but the marble base had to be removed to make the mold. Robert warned me it could break when trying to remove it…. which, in fact, it summarily did.

Robert added both colors of the patina, but the blacks did not turn out nearly black enough. I learned that it’s not possible to get a true black patina. The black would have to be painted on.

First, though, I had to replace the marble base. Robert recommended a place he works with in Los Angeles: Imported Onyx. He actually drove my base down to them, and left it for replication. When I called to pick the new base, there was no answer… for almost two weeks.

Meanwhile, I had posted the 3D rendering of the statue on Indiewalls, a website where artists can submit their work for various commercial and private needs, i.e. restaurants, hotels, homes, and so forth. A client actually purchased the statue based on the rendering, and needed it shipped to New York right away!

I found another base factory on the East Coast, and was about to place an order when, Victor, owner of Imported Onyx called and apologized as he’d been waylaid by surgery. At any rate, he turned out to be a great guy, and fabricated a new base in one day. I raced down from Santa Barbara to pick it up.

Having the mounted statue back in my studio, I had to apply the final black paint for the head and ear holes. I painstakingly masked off the bronze areas and applied the paint on Friday. Saturday was spent photographing and making video of the final work. Sunday, I prepared the packing crate. Monday, I ordered a plaque with title of piece and my name. Monday night, packed the work. Tues morning, drove the crate to FEDEX and had it shipped to NYC!

Since this version of PAX is a limited edition of 25, I only have to go through this 24 more times! Just kidding. Now that I’ve been through the process… and learned the potholes to avoid… it should be a snap making the other editions. At any rate, keep your fingers crossed for me.

 

MYTH OF PAX: BEAR GODDESS

In this epic, narrative installation series, Pax, the ancient Roman goddess of peace, Spring, and re-birth, returns to us as the spirit of a Mother Bear. The Pax project signals the arrival of a new global consciousness; a harmonious shift between the balance of patriarchal and matriarchal forces governing our planet. 

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LEARN MORE ABOUT “PAX: BEAR GODDESS LIMITED EDITION SCULPTURE

Congratulations to Artist Metrov on Sale of Sculpture

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Congratulations to Santa Barbara, California artist Metrov. He shared his news with us–

“I’m happy to share my latest sale with you. PAX: BEAR GODDESS is a bronze (limited edition of 25) sculpture from my series MYTH OF PAX: BEAR GODDESS. The first of this series is going to her new home—the lobby at 298 Mulberry Street, New York, New York. Beautify the World with Art!”

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Feeling stressed? Smile. Inhale 1-2-3. Keep smiling. Exhale 1-2-3-4-5! (learn more)

 

ScavengArt – Hunt For Free Artworks!

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This is a fun and interesting project created by Washington, DC artist Jennifer Droblyn who came up with this unique way of distributing art in her community. She posted pictures on Facebook of her small paintings hidden for strangers to search for and find –each piece accompanied by a small message that allowed the discoverer to know what they found and where to learn more about the process and artist.

Now the project is worldwide. Any artist can participate as long as their art pieces are original (writing, paintings, jewelry, or sculptures) and left in public places. The artist leaves the work in a sealed bag along with information about ScavengArt. Artists can leave work anonymously or provide their personal information. Once a piece is hidden the artist then promotes their piece using Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #ScavengArt and on Instagram.

Hunt free works of art worldwide! Find Clues on Instagram at @scavengart and on Facebook here.

ScavengArt is an interactive social media project. The concept of ScavengArt creates connections of lesser-known artists and collectors who discover them and post about it on their social media accounts. Through social media ScavengArt participants can reach a large audience across all areas.

Find out more on the ScavengArt website here.

Design By Humans 20% Off Sale + Artists Designers Open Your Own Shop

 

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Design By Humans is having a 20% Off Sale if you’d like to shop their collections

If you are an artist or designer — you many want to enter their art and design competitions, each of which is based on a theme. View the winners of the recent Prehistoric Collection here.

Design By Humans also has a vibrant and interesting Street Art Collection here.  Review Game Designs here, Horror Designs here and Zombies here.  Robots and Artificial Intelligence designs are here.

 

Design By Humans empower artists by providing them with their own storefront to display and sell their work as art prints and on t-shirts, tank tops, phone cases and more. Open a store today.

 

Artists + Designers Submit To New Online Sales Venue

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Creame is coming soon. Creame will sell wall art, art prints, and accessories in their online shop.

If you are an artist or designer send them an email.  Visit the Creame website for details.

We’re also adding Creame to our growing list of art sales platforms here.

 

How To Add Photos of Your Art to Your Instagram

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Ever since Facebook bought Instagram a couple years ago, I’ve been receiving a steady stream of notifications– your Facebook friend has joined Instagram–yet many of these new instagram accounts remain empty.

You don’t need to own an iPad or iPhone to add photos to Instagram

Over the years I’ve added photos directly from my iPad using my iPad camera to my Instagram account. Usually when I visited a museum exhibition I’d get lots of shots of the art, and sharing to Instagram as I viewed the work added another dimension to the museum going experience.

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Over the past month, I’ve been adding photos to multiple Instagram accounts, that I own or manage, using Latergram. Just yesterday the Latergram logo changed along with their name, which is now shortened to Later. You can get Later for your android phone and use Later on your computer to share photos of your art to your Instagram account.

Schedule auto posts with the Later calendar(screen shot of Later calendar below). You can get the Later app in the Google Play store here. It’sfree.

Once you have the Later app installed on your phone, make sure you also have the Instagram app on your phone too. Go to Later on your computer and sign in with Instagram.

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  1. Click upload media to upload your image.
  2. Drag your image into the calendar to the date and time you wish to post. A box opens allowing you to add text beside the image and hashtags: #art #painting #drawing #fineartphotography etc

Your phone will alert you when the image is ready to post. You tap on the image to open it in Instagram where you have the edit image options. Before you post, press your finger on the text box and the *paste* button will appear. Press the paste button to paste the text you added to the image in Later. Then post to Instagram.

Later calendar allows you to drag you image to a date and time slot

Later calendar allows you to drag you image to a date and time slot

New Online Magazine for the Highly Creative Coming This Summer

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Gasmask is a new online digital magazine wishing to feature art,  the highly creative and the eccentric. Gasmask Magazine is coming this summer. Sign up to their newsletter here.

Follow Gas Mask Magazine on Instagram here.

Gas Mask Magazine on Twitter here.

The founders want their magazine to be a voice for art, life, & positivity. Anything is possible for you today! ☄

For links to thousands of art and design magazines get our e-list here.

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Get 40 Free Etsy Listings To Sell Your Art, Use Discount Coupons to Get Repeat Sales from Buyers

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Yesterday’s article featured sales tips for sellers on the EyeEM app. Today, we’re sharing some tips for Etsy sales.

Set Up Your Etsy Shop and Get 40 Free Listings–

First of all, you can get your first 40 Etsy listing free when you sign up and set up your shop via this link.

Try Affordable Art Listings

Some committed Etsy sellers make many thousands of dollars selling their art and art products on Etsy. One prolific artist, Scott Bergey, offers a large selection of one-of-a-kind artworks at affordable retail prices–take a look at this artist’s Etsy shop here for ideas on what to sell in yours. Add artworks in a range of price points and let your audience of buyers tell you what sells.

How to Get Repeat Sales

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It takes much more time and expense to find new buyers than it does to cultivating repeat business from your current buyers. Get repeat sales from your buyers by offering them perks such as free shipping, or discounts off price.

An Etsy shop feature allows you create discount coupon codes. In your Etsy store click on Your Shop in the top menu, then go to Promote and then Coupon Codes and select options to generate coupons.

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With your Etsy shop discount codes you can offer 3 options–free shipping, a percentage discount or a fix price discount–and set a date when these discounts will expire.

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Adding new listing to your Etsy shop costs only .20 cents and there are no commissions. Plus you can get 40 free listings when you set up your new Etsy shop via this link.

Share your Etsy Listings on Social Media

Pin your art images to Pinterest linked to your Etsy shop to bring in customers. Tweet each of your new listings via your Twitter account–with clickable link in your tweet and art image attached.

Life Imitates Art Fundraiser Art Auction March 12th

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On Saturday, 12 March 2016 at 2 p.m. (14h00), DignitySA hosts a Prestigious Art Auction at the magnificent 5 star Hollywood Mansion in Camps Bay, Cape Town, South Africa.  Anyone around the world may bid on the art at the auction via telephone.

Notable South African artists will be represented including Benon Lutaaya, Barry Lungu, Dr Jack & Curtis, Restone Maambo, Lioda Conrad, Casper de Vries, John Adams, Carrol Boyes, JP Meyer, Shani Krebs, Alex Hamilton, Andre du Toit, Shui-Lynn White, Jade Holing, Jill Coleman, Dlamini Tendai, Mkhululi Dukuza, TC Malia, Edward Selematsela, David Barkham, Keith Zenda, Sylvia de Villiers and Arlette Franks- to mention a few. A special addition to the auction is a “for children” lot which includes works by Robin Stransham-Ford’s daughter, Epiphany (13); Mario Oriani-Ambrosini’s son, Luke (8); Diago Moss (4), nephew of the late Avron Moss, and Kayla Molenaar (12).

One of South Africa’s foremost female artists, Lioda Conrad, was commissioned by DignitySA to do a portrait series of the honorees. She chose her “Fluidity of Identity” series, and not only donated the portraits, but agreed to act as Curator for the event. Details of her Fluidity Series can be found here: http://www.xposy.com/…/life-imitates-art-lioda-conrad-flui…/

DignitySA chose art to raise funds as artists see beauty where others sometimes cannot. Death and dying needn’t be hideous – it can be a gentle, dignified experience, for the patient and their loved ones.

Remote bidding and on the day sales of additional artworks will be available.

Guests and art collectors can look forward to entertainment by Marc Lottering and Keri Stroebel; unique artwork; experiencing Carlo Harris – a Master Auctioneer – at work; mingling with esteemed guests, board members and legal team, bidding paddle lucky draws; and enjoy delectable gourmet snacks and Montpellier wines.

For more information and a look at some of the works available, or to book a ticket, visit www.dignitysa.org. Tickets are limited, with just 90 tickets still available at R800 per person. Tax deductible donations in lieu of attendance will be welcomed. Contact: Lee on 0769424477 or at lee@dignitysa.org.

Honorees include our first democratic president, President Nelson Mandela – for his Draft Bill “The End of Life Decisions Act of 1999”, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who got the world talking when he publicly supported the right to choose a dignified death and Professor Sean Davison – who founded DignitySA.

The purpose of the fundraiser is two-fold: To raise funds for the Appeal and to honour those who have dedicated themselves to changing an unjust law.

In a recent groundbreaking judgment in the North Gauteng High Court, Judge Hans Fabricius granted DignitySA’s applicant, Adv. Robin Stransham-Ford, the right to an assisted death. This ruling has, however, been set aside due to the State and others appealing the judgment. The date of the Appeal has yet to be announced, but DignitySA’s legal team is fully prepared to vigorously defend our human right to dignity and autonomy over our bodies, for those who demand choice at end-of-life.

 

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Previously Unknown Andy Warhol Painting Discovered + Authenticated

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As one who has spent many hours inside the Andy Warhol Museum admiring the galleries of colorful Pop Art and the collections of early Warhol works, it’s easy to see that this newly discovered painting fits right in. This Warhol painting–The Thinker / Thinking Outside the Box / Boy with Birdcage has that early Warhol style, and experts who have authenticated and appraised the artwork have placed it at a value ranging between $500,000 – $2.5 Million US dollars.

Thinking Outside The Box / The Thinker aka Boy with Birdcage was authenticated on December 26, 2015 by G.B. Tate & Sons Fine Art of Laramie, Wyoming. The appraisal document of G.B. Tate and Sons states, “The subject artwork is typical of the artist and compares favorably in quality and subject matter with many other examples of the genre offered in the marketplace. All other factors, including technique, style and signature, are consistent with original works by the artist.”

Amazingly enough, this previously unknown Andy Warhol painting was discovered in a thrift store by a Mr. Michael Wilson, who says, “I’m a rare art finder. It’s a long story. A gift I’ve had since a teenager. It’s a very unusual gift.”

Mr. Wilson, a collector of rare artifacts, purchased the Warhol artwork for around forty dollars in a California thrift store–a framed artwork that had no doubt been passed-over by many other shoppers who were unable to recognize it as a valuable work of art.

“It was a neat discovery,” Michael Wilson, told us here at Artist Marketing Resources, asking us to share his news with our readers. To date, there has been very little written about his find, beyond a small newspaper story here.

Mr. Wilson told us that –“When I saw it at the thrift store I think I was attracted to the image concept…it was a strange and unusual feeling I had about it, and I questioned myself why I bought it. The name was illegible, the price was around $40.00. At the time I didn’t have room to hang it so I put it up in the attic. Sometime later a news report came out about two Englishmen visiting Las Vegas who went to a yard sale–one named Andy Fields, who bought a couple of etchings or drawings at the sale. They then returned home to the UK. As Andy Fields was re-framing the artworks, in the back of one of them he found an Andy Warhol signed color drawing of what is believed to be Rudy Vallee. Allegedly, one of Andy Warhol’s earliest ones from when he was around 10 or 11 years old. When I saw the news report I also was able to see the drawings signature capital letter “A” with a swirl on top, and it reminded me of seeing it before. It didn’t take long before I realized it reminded me of the painting in my attic. I took a look at it and could see it was the same capital letter “A” with that swirl. So, I got curious about what Andy Warhol signatures looked like and, lo and behold, I found an abundance of his informal signatures on record. I didn’t know anything about Andy Warhol then. I didn’t do anything about it at the time.

Around two years ago, Daniel Blau managed to acquire around 200 drawings by Andy Warhol, never-before-seen by the public, from the Warhol Foundation. He released around five to nine of them on the internet. I think the rest might be in a book. I did some research on Andy for a while and found his white face art and other comparable pictures. But when I saw one of the released drawings of a little boy resembling my painting, that went beyond coincidence. With the gathering of evidence I could see the painting was of Andy Warhol himself.

Mr. G. B. Tate, an art expert I once hired for an old painting I had, is a meticulous authenticating researcher. I had gathered up a lot of evidence, but, I still wanted to know who the little boy was….I eventually contacted Mr. G.B. Tate and asked if he could research the Warhol painting for me. He said he has had experience through his many years with Warhol art research, but, it would take a while. The rest is history…”

If you are interested in this Andy Warhol artwork, you can contact Mr. Wilson via telephone or email– find contact information here.

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