Copyright + Copyleft: Free Webinar On Issues + Imitation for Artists on Dec 17th

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On monday, I shared details in an article here about the new platform called ArtSquare, where artists get photos  of their art made into high-resolution files for printing and publishing.

Andy Derrick, Head of Artist Community at ArtSquare, wrote to thank and to tell me about their webinar on December 17th called “Copyright & Copyleft.”  It’s going to be a conversation with Robert Panzer (Director at VAGA Rights) and Gwenn Seemel (artist/speaker/author) about their different perspectives of how artists can view/handle imitation and copyright issues.

This free webinar with two very interesting people and perspectives– should be great! Andy says, “I thought this might be up your alley. If you want to include an invite in your newsletter or social media feel free to do so.”

Artist Marketing Resources artists are invited to attend this free webinar hosted by ArtSquare about artist copyright issues and imitation with a couple leading voices on the subject. You can sign up for free herehttps://artchat.typeform.com/to/Sx9Cui

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Urban Outfitters Takes Artist’s Artwork Found Online, Prints On Mini Skirt–Without Artist’s Consent!

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Artist James Soares aka Spires, sells his art prints and art designs printed on 3-D items in his store on the e-commerce site Society 6. Spires created the above side-by-side comparison of his artwork obviously used on the Urban Outfitters mini skirt.  On his Tumblr blog the artist is asking others to reblog his story and share. The Huffington Post wrote this article about the design printed on the mini skirt without the artist’s knowledge, permission, any licensing contract, or payment. The Village Voice published an article on the mini skirt design yesterday. In the comments from readers of the Huffington Post article, one artist wrote, “It’s happened to me. I had my painting “Arizona Sunset” turned into a print for a dress . . . flattering and maddening at the same time.”

According to other artists, and other news stories, Urban Outfitters has copied more than one jewelry design. A necklace in the shape of New York State with a heart cut out, that was designed by Etsy artist Stevie Koerner and available in his e-commerce Etsy store as part of his United States of Love line, appeared in a new Urban Outfitters line of the same name. Steve Koerner wrote, in part, “The World/United States of Love line that I created is one of the reasons that I was able to quit my full-time job.  They even stole the item name as well as some of my copy.”  The story of this design theft appeared, with photos, in the Huffington Post article Urban Outfitters Steal and on the artist’s Tumblr page as Not Cool Urban Outfitters.

Some non-artist commenters on the recent Huff mini skirt article bring up questions of originality. Are these original designs– a map of New York state, the heart shape, a landscape of an Arizona sunset in a painting, or the geometric triangle pattern in the artist’s print (the one obviously copied and used on the mini skirt)? Haven’t we seen these things before and aren’t they part of our collective consciousness owned by all?  Another question, does Urban Outfitters work with another company, BamBam, and are they responsible for the ripped off artist’s design on the mini skirt? Yet, it’s also reported  by The Brooklyn Paper, and in an article in The Village Voice that an Indie jewelry designer selling at a Brooklyn flea market found her designs sold as very similar items by Urban Outfitters. Are such artworks and designs deliberately searched for, copied and used by large companies for the very reason that they doubt small business owners have the resources to fight back? Can these artists prove loss-of-income or originality of design?

It is time-consuming for artist-owners of small businesses to pursue matters legally,  yet one artist that we featured in our blog last year did just that. She received a check in payment, compensating her for the unauthorized use of her artwork on three album covers. The lawyer she worked with was available free of charge via Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts.

I’ve always found the Huffington Post to be artist friendly–publishing artist news  and featuring quality art news columns by several writers. Is Huffington Post the largest news source to cover these matters for artists? The Village Voice supports artists with reports on these artist rip-offs as well.

I can’t help but wonder how many times they get away with it? That is, how many times do such infringements go unnoticed in relation to the few instances companies are caught in outright copyright infringement?

 

 

Netherlands Media Art Institute: Upload Your Art to the Annlee Blog Project

The internet is considered a free medium through which people are able to find, spread and re-mix information, but at the same time this freedom is limited by boundaries like copyright laws which have become increasingly complicated and prominent. How does this influence artists? To what extent are artworks open to interpretation and intervention?In 1999, the artists Pierre Huyghe and Philippe Parreno bought a manga character from “K” works, a Japanese firm that develops Manga figures. Huyghe and Parreno decided to ‘free the image from the animation market’, named ‘her’ Annlee, made their own initial works and invited other artists to use Annlee for new art projects, free of charge. Annlee was given a voice, history and an identity and she popped up in animation videos, paintings, objects, installations, posters and a magazine, soundworks and a book. In the end 28 works were produced by 18 different artists. The project was finalized in 2002 with the artists definitively killing her off (including a coffin) and liberating her from the realm of representation -as they described it- by signing over the copyrights of the image to Annlee herself.Is this really the end? Is Annlee dead, truly free, or both? Copyright was used explicitly to lock up an appropriated image that has the potential to flow freely as an open art work. Annlee has disappeared as an image, but not as an entity that can be discussed and talked about or as a subject for new artworks. A decade after the project came to an end, artists are invited  to respond to the Annlee project ‘unofficially’ hoping to open up the character to new art pieces. As Philippe Parreno suggested: “the project doesn’t stop in the absence of Annlee, it can always produce more authors.” We look forward to your input, ideas and brand new artworks!Art can be uploaded onto the blog dedicated to this ‘Annlee @ NIMk’ project annlee.nimk.nl. The blog will be shown in the exhibition
USER INFO
http://nimk.nl/blog/annlee/wp-admin/
user: gast
password: welkom

For inspiration and more information about the manga character and project go to:
http://www.noghostjustashell.com/
http://www.airdeparis.com/pann2.htm

Netherlands Media Art Institute
Keizersgracht 264
1016 EV Amsterdam
The Netherlands
T 020 6237101
F 020 6244423
http://www.nimk.nl

MEDIA ART, WE CARE: read, react and forward: http://nimk.nl/nl/media-art-we-care

http://nimk.nl/agenda
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NIMk.Media.Art
Twitter: http://twitter.com/NIMk_nl
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nimk
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/NIMkartchannel
Media Art Platform: http://www.mediaartplatform.nl

Link: http://annlee.nimk.nl/

Deadline: Wed Aug 15th, 2012

What To Do If Photos of Your Art on Pinterest Are Misused

Pinterest

Pinterest (Photo credit: PixByDee)

Pinterest is now one of the top three social media sites. That’s right, now it is Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

So far, I have only read of one jewelry designer who had her photos misused by a spammer on Pinterest. The spammer linked computer viruses to her product name and images. Pinterest removed the spammer from their site. Read the full Daily Dot story here.

Artists should be aware that there is a copyright infringement form for Pinterest. If you discover misuse of your art image on the Pinterest site, complete and submit the Pinterest copyright infringement form—you will find it here: http://pinterest.com/about/copyright/dmca/