Do You Have a Room, Garage or Other Domestic Space to Host A Feminist Art Project?

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There are commercial lists of art galleries online designed to attract visitors to the galleries. Our International Art Gallery e-list is for artists, with gallery submission guidelines, and includes artist-run spaces and projects, and alternative project spaces.

One such alternative gallery space, previously based in New York City and now hosting Craftswoman House Temporary Residence Project in Los Angeles–Craftswoman House, seeks feminist collaborators. Their guidelines ask: “Do you have a hall closet, spare room, garage or other domestic space where you could host a project? Have a curatorial proposal or idea for a show? We want to hear from you!”  Visit the Craftswoman House website here. Follow the project on their blog here.

 

 

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All art gallery submission guidelines as listed in the International Art Gallery Directory e-list available here and here.  Our e-list  art sales venues are listed here and here.

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Connecting With Art Collectors via Artist Catalogs

Will Smith, cut paper and ink, Marco Gallotta

Will Smith, cut paper and ink, Marco Gallotta

 

PoetsArtists Magazine began publishing a series of full color art catalogs in 2015, of collections of artists’ work that, so far, includes paintings by Jeff Bess, paintings by feminist painter Daena Title that examine beauty and Barbie dolls, the cut paper-work portraits of New York based Italian artist Marco Gallotta, and the hyperreal wet faces of Erica Elan Ciganek, portraits and objects by Stephen Wright, and the nude portrait paintings of Victoria Selbach.

Painted Mask, Jess Bess

Painted Mask, Jeff Bess

Didi Menendez, publishing editor at PoetsArtists Magazine has written a short piece for us titled Connecting With an Art Collector that contains her insights on why art collector really need these catalogs to help them understand the work of any artist.

Artists can submit their art for consideration on the PoetsArtists Magazine site here .

Connecting with an Art Collector

by Didi Menendez

 

I have been noticing a trend in art collecting recently where the buyer is more interested about the story behind the facade than the artwork. These collectors seem to be perplexed about the meaning of a work. They seem concerned about the originality and motive behind the finished works. Not only do they want to know why a piece was created but also how it was conceived and the mediums used. I think it is because the art being collected by these silent art enthusiasts is being bought by a generation whom have spent half of their lifetime not only in front of a computer screen but also the ones who built the functionalities behind the screen. Even though digital art and photography belong to this conversation, I think the trend is to buy artwork which it is not mass-produced. Genuine and heartfelt pieces of work which adds an undisclosed value to the work being purchased. I think this may be why realism and figurative work may be back the limelight. These new trend may be due to how our society has become digitized to the point that soon we too may become a hallucination. These buyers want to have a connection to the artwork. This is why Facebook  and other social media exists. It allows us to connect to people we normally would not have met otherwise.

 

Offering, Erica Elan Ciganek

Offering, Erica Elan Ciganek

I realize artists want their work to speak for itself but I feel it is necessary to educate potential buyers as to why you create even if it is a simple answer as to say “This is a fish. This is a truck. This is a chair…” If there is no story behind your artwork that is fine too. Just say that. Some collectors just need to know that “the fish” is simply a painting of a fish but others want to know more. It may be important even necessary for them to understand if “the fish” took months to paint because the artist is a hyperrealist and wanted to show every speckle society and pollution has left on “the fish” and that this particular artist of “the fish” went to such and such a school to learn this technique and studied with so and so. I think the buyers I am addressing want to know this information. I don’t think they really care if the artist used the best linen, canvas, oil paints and brush. They just need to feel a connection. Whether it is love at first sight or not.

 

Big Boll, oil painting, Daena Title

Big Doll, oil painting, Daena Title

 

For example, I have been communicating lately with someone whom I went to High School with about art just because I like to talk about art in general. He showed an interest in a hyperrealist colored pencil drawing I had posted on Facebook. I reached out to my friend and asked him if he owned artwork. He said he had a few prints and such. I asked him if I could email him a few of the art catalogs I have been publishing recently and he agreed to see them. He reached out to me after he had spent some time contemplating the works and said the artwork had left him a bit perplexed because he wanted to know “what did any of it mean?”. Since I am representing these artist in not a traditional way as a gallery would but as their publisher I explained each of the works to him which he showed an interest in.  My intention in showing him the catalogs was not to sell him something but to open the conversation about art and possibly open a window for him which may have been closed.

 

Catherine 3, Stephen Wright

Catherine 3, Stephen Wright

I want to offer you my thoughts on my own recent artwork which is those thread paintings you may have seen me post on Facebook. It occurred to me to try out sewing a painting on canvas because I had seen it done before and I thought I could do it too. When I sew I can’t help but think of my mother. She worked at various factories when I was growing up until my sister and I left High School and found jobs to support ourselves. I also think about how her sewing kept our family from totally falling apart because my father was insane. Lately I have started to collaborate with another artist whom sent me a piece of an artwork she had slashed and I have been sewing it together to make it whole again. I call it the Hyphen series.

Didi Menendez PoetsArtists Magazine

Laukika Apsara, Victoria Selbach

Laukika Apsara, Victoria Selbach

View each artist’s catalog —

Jeff Bess

Daena Title

Marco Gallotta

Erica Elan Ciganek

Stephen Wright

Victoria Selbach

The Feminist Art Project Presents a Day of Panels at the Museum of Arts and Design

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THE FEMINIST ART PROJECT PRESENTS A DAY OF PANELS AT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGNSATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2015   FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.  No registration needed.
 The Feminist Art Project (TFAP), now in its ninth year of successfully shining a spotlight on feminist art and its impact on art and culture worldwide, announces the schedule for a special symposium at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) in New York City. With an impressive list of participants, The Feminist Art Project will present a diverse set of panels that will be of interest to anyone curious about contemporary art and ideas. The 2015 Day of Panels will take place on Saturday, February 14 from 9am – 5pm at MAD. The panels, entitled Collective Creativity: Collaboration and Collectives in Feminist Art Practice, are organized by Damali Abrams, Artist; Jenn Dierdorf, Artist, Co-Director of the Fellowship Program and Development, A.I.R. Gallery; Kathleen Wentrack, Art historian, City University of NY,Queensborough. The symposium will focus on Collaborative working methodologies and how women’s collectives have been crucial to feminist art practice since the 1970s. As feminist practice continues to evolve, collaboration and collectivity continue to provide an alternative to the patriarchal ideal of individualism. This day of panels will explore both a communal approach to working in a variety of media and group support structures for women artists both historical and present day. Panels and Participants:*Collaboration and Collectivity: The Past or Future of Feminist Exhibition Making – Chair:KalliopiMinoudaki (Independent Art Historian) Panelists: DorisCaçoilo (_gaia), LaurenDenitzio (Artist; For the Birds), KateWadkins (Writer/Curator; For the Birds); Dr. Maura Reilly (University of Sidney),Ridykeulous (curatorial collective).Roundtable: A Community of M/E/A/N/I/N/G – Co-Chairs: Susan Bee (Pratt Institute; University of Pennsylvania) and Mira Schor (Parsons, The New School) Panelists: Joyce Kozloff (Independent Artist) Sheila Pepe (Pratt Institute), Kara Rooney (Independent Artist, The Brooklyn Rail), Alexandria Smith (Independent Artist).*Gatecrashing: Feminist Collaboration and Institutional Intervention – Co-chairs: KatGriefen (Rutgers University), and Meredith Brown (Metropolitan Museum of Art) Panelists: A.K. Burns (Artist and Educator), Jorge DanielVeneciano, (ElMuseo del Barrio), and the collectiveHOWDOYOUSAYYAMINAFRICAN?.*When the Personal Becomes Political: Creative Activism/Collective Intentions – Chair: Nina Felshin (Independent Curator/Writer/Activist) Panelists/Collectives: Anjana Malhotra (SUNY Buffalo; Visible Collective); Mona Eldahry, (Arab Women Active in the Arts and Media); and Dread Scott (Postcode Criminals).

*Power, Collaboration, and Lies  Chair: Katherine Behar (Baruch College) Panelists: Stephanie Rothenberg (University of Buffalo); Jeff Crouse (Odd Division/NEW INC, New Museum); Larisa Mann (New York University); Sydette Harry (Body Ecology Performance Ensemble); Liz Flyntz (Smack Mellon/Extracurricular).

*Encouragements with Dave – Performance by J.R. Uretsky (Artist) and Emily Dix Thomas (Cellist)

*CollECtive NoW: Artists on the Collective Present – Roundtable – Chair: Dalida María Benfield (Vermont College of Fine Arts; Harvard University) Artist/Panelists: Salome Chasnoff (School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Personal Hermitage Productions, and Beyondmedia Education); Celia Herrera-Rodriguez (Artist/Teacher); Davida Ingram (Seattle People of Color Salon); Jessica Resmond (MEI Collectiv); Beatriz Santiago-Muñoz (Beta-Local); Robert Sember (Ultra-red, and The New School’s Eugene Lang College); Sasha Sumner (Hungry March Band, Pratt Institute, and the Pedagogy Group).

For more information and to view the full descriptions and schedule, and location details visit

The Feminist Art Project.
 To obtain jpeg images and to schedule interviews, please contact:
The Feminist Art Project: 848-932-3726  ctell@rci.rutgers.edu

The Feminist Art Project promotes diverse feminist art events and education through its website and online calendar.  Website visitors can find exhibitions, lectures, artist talks, films, educational resources, and other art related activities in their area or to include in travel plans.  The website offers hundreds of links to websites of interest. The Feminist Art Project is a program at  Rutgers University, and is a unit of the Office of Institutional Diversity and Inclusion at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. For more information about TFAP, please visitfeministartproject.rutgers.edu.

The Feminist Art Project
is proud to include on its Honorary Committee:
Norma Broude, American UniversityE. John Bullard, New Orleans Museum of Art, EmeritusConnie Butler, Hammer Museum of ArtMary D. Garrard, American UniversityChrissie Iles, Whitney Museum of American ArtArnold Lehman, Brooklyn MuseumLucy R. Lippard, Writer and activistMargo Machida, University of ConnecticutCindy Nemser, Author, critic, journalist

Linda Nochlin, NYU Institute of Fine Arts

Faith Ringgold, Artist

Lowery Stokes Sims, Museum of Art & Design

Gloria Steinem, Co-founder Ms. Magazine

The Feminist Art Project
National Coordinating Committee members are:

Judith K Brodsky, Co-Founding Director, Institute for Women & Art,Rutgers UniversityJudy Chicago, Artistic Director, Through the FlowerKat Greifen, Director, A.I.R. GalleryLeslie King-Hammond, Maryland Institute College of ArtCatherine Morris, Curator, Elizabeth A.Sackler Center for Feminist ArtDena Muller, Executive Director,ArtTableFerris Olin, Co-Founding Director, Institute for Women & Art,
Rutgers University

Susan Fisher Sterling, Director, The National Museum of Women in the Arts

Anne Swartz, Professor, Savannah College of Art and Design

Voices: An Artist’s Perspective Seeks Art in All Media

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Hi Artists! Here is another great call for art that is in conjunction with UniteWomen.org. Hope you are having a great summer and I look forward to another impactful and meaningful exhibition by women artists!  Best, Karen

Voices: An Artist’s Perspective

Voice, by definition, includes a larger sense of expression than just the utterance of sound; it also signifies meaning and intention in artistic pursuits.  “Voices: An Artists Perspective” seeks art in all media with works portraying a unique, individual voice and style to tell stories, whether the voice is as soft as a whisper or a loud, primal scream that will engage the viewer.

Feminism advocates for freedom from restrictive sex roles and the inclusion of all voices in its push for gender equality and the fight for social, cultural, economic and political rights. This call for art seeks to include broad concepts of imagery using a woman’s voice as the visual narrative. Expressing your voice through art to tell your story is a means to reveal mind and spirit whether with symbolic bold energy or subtle poetic expression. Share your voice, your story, your art.

Enter here:  http://www.entrythingy.com/www.unitewomen.org#dashboard

JURORS:  Joan McLoughlin, McLoughlin Gallery, San Francisco and Amanda Uribe, gallery nine5, NYC.

The work will first be juried by Karen Gutfreund and UniteWomen.org from all entries to 100 pieces that will be included in the catalog and online gallery. From these works, Joan McLouglin and Amanda Uribe will also jury the selections for the gallery and choose their top three works each which will also be premiered on the UniteWomen.org website.

EXHIBITION VENUE:  NAWA Gallery, National Association of Women Artists. 80 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1405, New York, NY.

DATES OF EXHIBITION:  April 2 to April 30, 2015

ARTIST RECEPTION:  Thursday, April 2, 2015. 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

ELIGIBILITY:  Open to all self-identified women artists.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION:  You must complete submission by Thursday, September 25th by 11:59 PM in your time zone. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by October 24th, 2015.

QUESTIONS?  Email KarenGutfreundArt@gmail.com

UniteWomen.org Mission Statement:

As a national non-partisan grassroots organization, our mission is to end inequality for women that stems from prejudice and discrimination and to defend and advance the human and civil rights of women and girls. UniteWomen.org Manifesto:  http://www.unitewomen.org/manifesto/

ABOUT THE NAWA GALLERY:

In January of 1889, five innovative women, Grace Fitz-Randolph, Edith Mitchell Prellwitz, Adele Frances Bedell, Anita C. Ashley, and Elizabeth S. Cheever, barred from full participation in the male-dominated National Academy of Design and The Society of American Artists, founded the Women’s Art Club. The organization flourished and in 1913 was renamed the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors, reflecting its national influence and the increasing number of women sculptors. Through the 1920’s the organization was sponsoring exhibitions nationally and abroad. In the 1930s membership grew to over 1,000 and the organization opened its Argent Galleries on 57th Street in New York City. In 1941, the organization changed its name again to the National Association of Women Artists.

Early exhibitions included works by the notable artists Rosa Bonheur, Mary Cassatt, Suzanne Valadon and Cecelia Beaux.  Later, membership rosters included Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Anna Hyatt Huntington, Louise Nevelson, Cleo Hartwig, Malvina Hoffman, Minna Citron, Alice Neel, Theresa Bernstein, Nell Blaine, and Dorothy Dehner.

Mission Statement

The purpose of the National Association of Women Artists (N.A.W.A.) is to foster public awareness of, and interest in, visual art created by women in the United States. The Association promotes culture and education in the visual arts through exhibitions of its members’ works, educational programs, scholarships, awards, its historical archive, and other appropriate means.

While encouraging contemporary and emerging artists, the Association honors and continues the long and important contribution of women to the history of American culture and art.

Through N.A.W.A.’s exhibitions, programs, events, education programs and archive, the Association fosters awareness of the monumental contribution of women to the history of American culture and art. The organization is inclusive and serves professional women visual artists of all backgrounds and traditions that are at least 18 years of age and U.S. citizens or permanent U.S. residents. N.A.W.A. is a 501©3 not-for profit, tax exempt organization.

Terms and conditions:

SUBMISSIONS:  Artists may submit up to three works per entry with three separate entries (total of 9 images with three separate entries).  All media is accepted except giclees of original work.

DIMENSIONS:   There are NO size restrictions on the size of works that can be submitted. If your work is framed, please include the framed size.

VIDEO:   Enter in .mov or mp4 format up to 200 mb. If accepted, artists must supply ALL their own equipment to display their video.

ENTRY FEES:  Payment of $35 per entry through PayPal for 3 images.  You may submit up to three separate entries for $35 for each 3 images (which means with 3 separate entries you can submit a total of 9 images).

SALES OF ART:  35% to NAWA, 10% to UniteWomen.org, 55% to Artist.  All works sold must remain in the gallery for the duration of the exhibition. A check will be issued to the artist within 30 days of the close of the exhibition.

DELIVERY OF ARTWORK

SHIPPED work should arrive to NAWA from Friday, March 27 to Wednesday, April 1st 2015 only. Schedule accordingly with your shipper of choice. Shipped works will be boxed and returned by May 5th.

Hand delivered works may be brought to the gallery on Wednesday, April 1st from noon to 4:30 p.m. only.

Hand delivered works must be picked up on Friday, May 1, 2015 from noon to 4:30 p.m. and shipped works will be shipped back that week.

All shipped works MUST include a return prepaid shipping label.

INSURANCE & LIABILITY:   All exhibited works must be self-insured by the artist.

AGREEMENT & RELEASE:  By submitting this application the Artist confirms they read and agree to the conditions set forth in this prospectus. Permission is granted to UniteWomen.org, Karen Gutfreund Art and the NAWA Gallery to use images of artwork accepted into the exhibition for publicity purposes. One or more artworks may be chosen for the cover design of invitation for the exhibition. They also may be featured on the organizations websites. Artists agree to allow reproduction of their digital files and/or photographs taken of their art for educational, publicity, and archival purposes. The Artist hereby releases and discharges representatives, employees and volunteers of UniteWomen.org, Karen Gutfreund Art and the NAWA from any and all claims occasioned by loss or damages of said work while in the possession of the gallery.

Enter here:  http://www.entrythingy.com/www.unitewomen.org#dashboard

QUESTIONS?  Email KarenGutfreundArt@gmail.com

Best regards,

Karen Gutfreund

Curator/Exhibition Director

www.unitewomen.org

Member, ArtTable

No. California TFAP Representative

The Feminist Art Project

http://feministartproject.rutgers.edu/home/

www.karengutfreund.com

Gallery & Museum Liaison
Women’s Caucus for Art

www.nationalwca.org