THE SAGA OF NU by Metrov: EXPLORE THE “NU” SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT

THE SAGA OF NU by Metrovwww.DoYouNU.com

Researching megastar artist, Takashi Murakami, I learned he first made millions from his business, Kaikaikiki, a commercial art production company. He was able to use this money to create larger scale works for the Fine Art arena. Similarly, Jeff Koons became a Wall Street broker to earn the money to finance his early works. This strategy of creating multiple income streams to survive and prosper as an artist applies not only to superstars, but to us every day creators as well.

I set out to produce what I call a “Commercial Fine Art” product… something I could readily manufacture in small quantities on my own in order to get the ball rolling; something, however, that could eventually sell in volume to develop a substantial revenue stream; something that would be a fit for high-end gift shops, department stores, and other outlets. In the past, this would have been frowned upon in the Fine Art World. Now it is not only acceptable, but expected. I spent the last several years trying a variety of ideas and experimenting with all the materials (traditional and new) I could lay my hands on. The road was rockier than expected.

Among the first products I developed were 3D acrylic works. I had my own designs and artwork printed on clear, Plexiglas panels, then used stand-offs to arrange them two or three panels deep.

"3D Tara Goddess Supreme with Pink Dots." (2015) Three layers of acrylic art held apart by brushed nickel stand-offs mounted to a wall; 36" x 52"

“3D Tara Goddess Supreme with Pink Dots.” (2015)
Three layers of acrylic art held apart by brushed nickel stand-offs mounted to a wall; 36″ x 52″

 

I also layered translucent, acrylic artwork inside shadow boxes, and as free-standing pieces, edge-lit with LED strip lighting.

 

"3D Tara Goddess Lightbox-Dot Gate" (2014) Three layers of acrylic art in black wooden box, edge-lit by adjustable LED lighting.

“3D Tara Goddess Lightbox-Dot Gate” (2014)
Three layers of acrylic art in black wooden box, edge-lit by adjustable LED lighting.

 

The results were often lovely, but acrylic prints are quirky and don’t always end up looking the way they are visualized in Photoshop, particularly when employing translucent effects and adding LED edge lighting (fyi, some acrylic sheets distribute the edge lighting evenly, some do not). And if the visual effect doesn’t work, guess what… the printed acrylic sheets are a bust, meaning money down the drain. But the biggest challenge was working with the acrylic itself. Without precision manufacturing equipment, it’s difficult to cut or drill, and often breaks where it should not. Additionally, cutting acrylic makes a huge mess… dust goes everywhere. My studio was not the ideal place to construct these pieces. I’d need a full-blown factory style workshop. Back to the drawing board.

I decided to see if I could reasonably produce one of my 3D models. I’d been creating sculptures in “Blender,” a free, open source, 3D modeling/animation software that’s equivalent to its professional counterparts costing many thousands of dollars. Not an easy learning curve, but very rewarding once you figure it out. (It only took me about five years, off and on, but that was learning on my own via Youtube tutorials.) The awesome thing about creating digital-based sculpture is that I can email the computer file to a foundry in China where they will 3D print it any size, and from that 3D print, form a mold. And from that, the work can be cast in a wide range of materials.

I’d created a character called “NU,” deceptively naïve, even cartoon-like in appearance, but part of a much larger installation series, “MYTH OF PAX: BEAR GODDESS,” 

which is very much on the frontiers of cutting edge fine art. Previously, I’d ordered the first casting as a nine inch, stainless steel sculpture. The results were magnificent, but costly. The stainless steel version of NU would have to retail at around $6,000.00, not exactly commercial department store faire.

 

Metrov with first stainless steel “NU”

Metrov with first stainless steel “NU”

At any rate, I decided NU would be my first “Commercial Fine Art” product, as it seems to have the “cute” factor going for it, and everyone loves “cute.”

So, how to produce the Commercial Fine Art version of NU? I began to experiment with materials and processes… wood, clay, metal, concrete, cardboard, Styrofoam, and more. Because of his unique shapes, NU would be difficult to make using any of these materials. Either that, or the materials just wouldn’t work at all. For example, I thought ceramic was surely the answer. After experimenting with various, slipcasting prototypes, I found out my design would not hold up in the “firing” process. I won’t go into detail about all the different things I tried, but when you’re researching, and ordering stuff, and waiting for it to arrive, and then finding time to actually assemble your ideas, time passes quickly… in this case, R&D, including the acrylic works, took years.

At last, I discovered “Ponoko,” a company that can cut out small designs from a variety of materials using a standard laser cutting technique. A lot of artists use Ponoko to produce jewelry and small figurines. Ponoko also does 3D printing, but sadly 3D printing is not yet ready for prime time—you end up with a rough, gritty surface. It also gets quite expensive. For example, I would have loved to have small NUs 3D printed in a metal like stainless steel or bronze, but the cost was in the thousands for a single 5” inch high figure.

However, laser cutting, which employs a 2D design format (even something as simple as an Illustrator .eps file), is far more cost-effective. I placed my first order for a 4” NU. The results were promising. Laser cutting is precise, and I was able to order ten figures cut from bamboo for around $200. So cost, not including my labor to finish, is around $20 each. And these days Fine Art Toys are selling anywhere between $150-250 bucks (and that’s for mass-produced, injection mold figures which are never touched by the artist’s hands). I also wanted something a little fancier than just a cut-out. Laser cutting can also make engraved areas which allowed me to have inlays made from a different material. This was getting exciting now. I really wanted the inlay pieces to be made from some kind of metal. Alas, Ponoko can’t laser cut metal. I reluctantly settled for black plastic in my excitement to get something finished.

I decided to “distress” the wooden bodies so they had an antique look. I also had to glue feet on because the cut-outs (only 1/4” thick) won’t stand on their own. After staining the wood, I glued the plastic inlay parts on by hand. I thought I’d done it, at lasta product I could reasonably produce on my own without a lot of initial headache and expenditure. (Injection molding runs around $20-30k for a minimum run.)

 

Early NU’s—waiting for the stain to dry. Note the engraved areas where inlays will be inserted.

Early NU’s—waiting for the stain to dry. Note the engraved areas where inlays will be inserted.

One of my plans for these figurines is to send them as gifts to gallery owners in New York and Los Angeles. After a couple of weeks, I realized, no matter how cute, I couldn’t send a hand-finished figurine that used plastic. Damn! I really wanted those metal inlays. Back to research. Fortunately, I found a company called “Pololu,” similar to Ponoko, but they laser cut metal! I ordered another batch of wooden figures with thin steel inlay parts. They arrived… and everything was magnificent, perfect, beyond my expectations. Still, I had to distress the wood, stain the metal, and glue everything together, but the parts fit together perfectly.

Meanwhile, during all this R & D, I was also researching the best gift packaging materials… another grueling excursion into the unknown. After looking at literally thousands of styles of gift boxes and stuffing materials, I finally found the perfect one—and this is big—one that was the perfect dimensions. AND I was able to order them in small quantities whereas most companies have minimum orders of hundreds. After years of sweat and failures, the NU Fine Art Figurine was ready at last.

 

Frame #23 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

Frame #23 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

 

 Next: How to sell NUs? I knew I wanted to eventually sell the figurines in large quantities… that’s where the real income would beincome potentially large enough to support my household, studio operations, and my more ambitious fine art projects. I knew you could submit products to high-end retail chains like “Restoration Hardware” and others. I also figured I could put them into museum and other gift shops. Still, it would be an “iffy” proposition. What if, after all that work, they didn’t sell? Unacceptable.

Because of my background writing film and novels, it occurred to me I might craft a kind of graphic novel using still images. I thought if I could capture the attention of my target audience, and get them emotionally involved with NU, they would help me spread the word. I could also have NU contests and give some away free. I decided to go this route… and I would not even hint at selling anything… not until my customers were hooked.

Crafting a compelling story using small still frames means you have to come up with a very succinct way of writing. You must convey as much as possible in one or two short phrases. Not to mention, of course, your visuals better be pretty damned exciting. I love taking photographs, especially of natural beauty, and have done so in my travels for many years, so I have a large archive of images I could use as backgrounds. I also had experience combining digital characters with real photos (sort of like the FX process used in LORD OF THE RINGS.)

 

Frame #37 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

Frame #37 from the Instagram Series: SAGA OF NU

I put “selling” aside, and got to work writing the SAGA OF NU. From my past experience in online marketing, I knew that it can typically take three years for something to catch on with a target audience. I also knew that “marketing” was something you’d have to keep doing for a long time, conceivably for the rest of your life if you’re talking about your art. So you’d better be marketing something you’re really passionate about; it had better be your Primary Mission in Lifethe Reason You’re On This Planetif you’re going to stick with it. Otherwise, you’re gonna burn out on the process, something I’d also experienced in the past.

I decided to start writing without a detailed outline… I wanted the story to be spontaneous. Early on, I realized NU could be a champion for things that are dear to my heart… socio-political causes which, fortunately, are embraced by the Art World. The Creature NU, quickly became an advocate for the environment, sustainability, love vs fear, the value of Living in the Now, and my vision of reinstating dignity and integrity to the Human Race (as opposed to the superficial, sickness-ridden, Market Society that is now the Mainstream).

Like the character, the SAGA OF NU starts off seemingly childlike and innocent. But the tale gradually grows darker and more surreal. NU himself falls victim to the allure of materialism. He will forget his ideals, succumb to greed, and eventually get a terrible, but common disease. It’s not until he almost dies, that he has an epiphany and evolves into the true hero he is meant to be.

So that’s where we are today. Fortunately, the Creature NU is gaining momentum on Instagram with over 35k followers at the time of this writing. The hub for the NU Project is www.DoYouNU.com where you can see the NU video, as well as visit the Instagram graphic novel and the NU Gear Etsy store. If you like NU, and share his ideals, then your support would be much appreciated. Follow NU, and invite your friends to do the same. As we all know, the artist who thrives off his art is the artist who establishes multiple revenue streams. This is true even for the fortunate few who have top tier gallery and museum representation. Whether I can sell figurines in the thousands, even millions, remains to be seen. But I sure plan to give him my best shot. (Move over Murakami!) I’ll start off with a Special Limited Edition until enough financing comes in for mass-produced versions.

Wish me luck, folks. I hope you find this story inspirational for your own creative endeavors in supporting your Art. Be Positive, Confident, and Never Give Up! And perhaps most importantly… HAVE FUN!

“NU—Vintage Series” Special Limited Edition 1500; wood and stained steel; 5” high—now available at Etsy! Gift wrapped with Hang Tag (also included on cards: Legend & Certificate of Ownership)

“NU—Vintage Series” Special Limited Edition 1500; wood and stained steel; 5” high—now available at Etsy!
Gift wrapped with Hang Tag (also included on cards: Legend & Certificate of Ownership)

     

Now an international symbol of Sustainability, the Creature
without compromising ours.

DOWNLOAD THE NU LOGO

INTERNATIONAL SYMBOL OF SUSTAINABILITY

Do You NU?


From the lineage of the great Gregory Gillespie, Metrov has been impacting the Fine Arts for over 35 years. His work resides in collections around the world, including those of celebrities like Mick Jagger, the Hemingways, and Academy Award winner, Robert Zemeckis. He is also an author, filmmaker, and environmental advocate who lives in Southern California.

Please watch the video on www.DoYouNU.com. We can use your Youtube “views.” Any comments on the Youtube video would also be much appreciated! To leave a comment just click the Youtube icon under the video. Thanks”

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ScavengArt – Hunt For Free Artworks!

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This is a fun and interesting project created by Washington, DC artist Jennifer Droblyn who came up with this unique way of distributing art in her community. She posted pictures on Facebook of her small paintings hidden for strangers to search for and find –each piece accompanied by a small message that allowed the discoverer to know what they found and where to learn more about the process and artist.

Now the project is worldwide. Any artist can participate as long as their art pieces are original (writing, paintings, jewelry, or sculptures) and left in public places. The artist leaves the work in a sealed bag along with information about ScavengArt. Artists can leave work anonymously or provide their personal information. Once a piece is hidden the artist then promotes their piece using Facebook and Twitter with the hashtag #ScavengArt and on Instagram.

Hunt free works of art worldwide! Find Clues on Instagram at @scavengart and on Facebook here.

ScavengArt is an interactive social media project. The concept of ScavengArt creates connections of lesser-known artists and collectors who discover them and post about it on their social media accounts. Through social media ScavengArt participants can reach a large audience across all areas.

Find out more on the ScavengArt website here.

How To Add Photos of Your Art to Your Instagram

Latergram

 

Ever since Facebook bought Instagram a couple years ago, I’ve been receiving a steady stream of notifications– your Facebook friend has joined Instagram–yet many of these new instagram accounts remain empty.

You don’t need to own an iPad or iPhone to add photos to Instagram

Over the years I’ve added photos directly from my iPad using my iPad camera to my Instagram account. Usually when I visited a museum exhibition I’d get lots of shots of the art, and sharing to Instagram as I viewed the work added another dimension to the museum going experience.

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Over the past month, I’ve been adding photos to multiple Instagram accounts, that I own or manage, using Latergram. Just yesterday the Latergram logo changed along with their name, which is now shortened to Later. You can get Later for your android phone and use Later on your computer to share photos of your art to your Instagram account.

Schedule auto posts with the Later calendar(screen shot of Later calendar below). You can get the Later app in the Google Play store here. It’sfree.

Once you have the Later app installed on your phone, make sure you also have the Instagram app on your phone too. Go to Later on your computer and sign in with Instagram.

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  1. Click upload media to upload your image.
  2. Drag your image into the calendar to the date and time you wish to post. A box opens allowing you to add text beside the image and hashtags: #art #painting #drawing #fineartphotography etc

Your phone will alert you when the image is ready to post. You tap on the image to open it in Instagram where you have the edit image options. Before you post, press your finger on the text box and the *paste* button will appear. Press the paste button to paste the text you added to the image in Later. Then post to Instagram.

Later calendar allows you to drag you image to a date and time slot

Later calendar allows you to drag you image to a date and time slot

New Online Magazine for the Highly Creative Coming This Summer

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Gasmask is a new online digital magazine wishing to feature art,  the highly creative and the eccentric. Gasmask Magazine is coming this summer. Sign up to their newsletter here.

Follow Gas Mask Magazine on Instagram here.

Gas Mask Magazine on Twitter here.

The founders want their magazine to be a voice for art, life, & positivity. Anything is possible for you today! ☄

For links to thousands of art and design magazines get our e-list here.

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Pro’jekt LA OPEN CALL + New FotoFund Crowdfunding Platform for Photo-based Works

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OPEN CALL for PRO’JEKT LA – IG  Its FREE!
Pro’jekt LA presents curated, themed, outdoor photography projections all over the city of Los Angeles. Submit and get the chance to showcase and sell your best work to the LA community.
Tag @MonthofPhotoLA in an Instagram post (aka your submission photo) and include the following hashtags in the description: #monthofphotola,#moplaIGJam2016 and#laphotocommunity. Then, submit online! Here    Deadline – April 4th, 2016

FOTOFUND

Fotofund is a crowdfunding platform exclusively for photo-based works. It is a newly initiated program of Lucie Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to the advocacy of photography worldwide. They asked us to share one of their current projects with our readers.

FOTOFUND CATEGORIES

Arts Row: Connecting Artists to Art Patrons by Location

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Last year, Arts Row curators invited me to add my art to their site. So I set up my free account and added several artworks which you can view here, the images are quite large! Which I like. As a WordPress user, I noticed right away that Arts Row uses WordPress. If you have WordPress skills you may enjoy the freedom you have to create your Arts Row profile listings.

The Arts Row blog will have a monthly feature in Art Market Magazine beginning with issue #20.

ArtMarketmagcover

Arts Row was established to connect artists to patrons in their geographic areas.

What also interests me, is how Arts Row seems to combine an artist directory, with art consulting services and an art magazine. I wish them success and am happy to invite other artists to Arts Row. Visit their site and click on Contact in the top menu to complete the online form. I also follow Arts Row on Instagram here.

 

Artist Clare Haxby Celebrates the Singapore Formula Race With an Art Print GiveAway on Instagram!

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The Singapore F1 takes place this month from 18-20 September. Artist Clare Haxby is Celebrating Singapore’s Formula One Street Track Night Race With a Fine Art Print Give-Away on Instagram. Read more about the race and Clare’s art here  and here.

Participate in the Clare Haxby Instagram Giveaway here –> http://bit.ly/WinAClareHaxbyEsplanadePrint
-CH Singapore Skyline _nightscape studio portrait 72dpi

 

How To Win #FreePaint in Spray Cans From Bombing Science: U Pick the Colors

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Turn Your Instagram Pictures Into Art With Canvas Prints

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Did you know there are over 300 million monthly Instagram users? This successful app has been around for less than 5 years, but it has turned into a massive social network and its growth does not seem to stop. Not too long ago, an Instagram picture made the cover of The Wall Street Journal. No kidding! Undoubtedly, Instagram is one of the most popular photo-sharing sites today.

What is so great about uploading pictures to Instagram? Well, it allows you to choose among various filters and end up with professional-looking pictures. You can fix any lighting issues or make your photos look more artistic just by selecting some of the available filters.

Now, since photo enthusiasts take enough pride on their shots to share them with their followers, wouldn’t you take that hobby one step ahead and transform them into canvas prints? All you have to do is select your most treasured Instagram photos and ask a professional online printer like 4over4.com to do the rest.

Choose Among Rolled or Stretched Canvas

The best thing about a personalized project is that you get to choose the photo you want to print, the material you want and where to place it after it is done. It is your project, so there are no rules to follow. Online printers offer several options and you can take your time to choose exactly what you need. For instance, take a look at this canvas print catalog, they let you customize size, print finish and paper type.

When you are creating a small art gallery for your home or office, you can choose either rolled or stretched canvas. Both options will give your space a unique touch However, the best choice depends on your preferences, budget, the space you have available and the desired results. Here is what you need to know to make a wise decision:

Stretched canvas: if you do not want to pay big bucks on expensive frames, choose stretched canvas as they are ready to mount on the wall. Its frameless effect looks great on any wall regardless of the wall color or canvas size. Plus, a stretched canvas is less likely to be damaged.

Rolled canvas: if you have a tight budget or maybe want to build a frame of your own, this is the best option for you. A framed canvas is commonly more durable than a stretched canvas. If you have a special type of frame in mind, go with rolled canvas to make them look vintage, classy, modern or the look that fits your interior design.

Are you an amateur photographer? Do you want to create a charming environment? Log into your Instagram account and choose the most fascinating pictures you have saved. Personalize a space without spending a fortune. Remember that a picture can tell more than a thousand words; it can tell a whole story.

Image courtesy of: Pixabay Cellphone

 

This Artist Took Our Tagging Advice: Feedback and Dramatic Results on Instagram!

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This week Sean Earley wrote an article on the dramatic results he achieved over a 24 hours period after adding “more targeted hashtags on Instagram.” Sean is a Digital Marketing Consultant at Digital Artist Marketing and an artist who creates vintage Pin-Up art. You can view some of his work on his Instagram profile here.

Normally, when Sean added his art images to Instagram, he’d tag each with #pinup #pinupart and #retro, to routinely get a couple of likes.

After reading our article, Get Your Art Showcased and Featured in Instagram Galleries, and taking our advice, he tried updating his previous Instagram art images by adding new hashtags to help him reach out to art buyers– such as: #homedecor #interiordesign #decorating #officedecor and others.

Sean Earley noted that within 24 hours of adding these hashtags to his art images, he received 92 likes, 7 new followers and 2 mailing list sign ups. This is a great start and he has new Instagram notifications still coming in.

 

If you are looking for many more ways to increase your visibility by getting your art viewed on social media platforms and featured in fine art magazines, on art blogs, listed  in art directories, on art TV, then get our  e-list of art publication resources for artists here and here.

 

 

Get Your Art Showcased and Featured in Instagram Galleries

Instagram

Artists who add hashtags to their art images get more visibility as they post their work to Instagram. Some hashtags artists use:  #abstract #abstractart  #abstract_and_contemporary_art  #acryliconcanvas  #artdealer #artwork #artcollector #artcollectors  #artforsale #apartmenttherapy  #artlovers  #atelier #artistportraits  #affordableart  #womenartists  #artbuyers  #buyart Collectart# #collecting  #decor #contemporaryart  #collect #collage #drawing #draw #drawingaday #thedailysketch #dotsofpaint #FineArtPrints #handpainted #homedecor #interiordesign #interiordecor #interiorstyling  #loveart #landscapes #livewithart #limitededition #lowbrowart  #mixedmedia #mixedmediaart #officedecor #paint  #paintingforsale #pastel #pastelpainting #print #prints #printchat  #PRINTMAKING  #portrait  #sellart

Artists also tag their art images for specific collections and online galleries that feature artists– here are a few:

Art Sanity on Instagram has over 143,000 followers, and they like to showcase the best artwork from undiscovered artists on Instagram. To get your work in front of their curators tag your art images with #artsanity. Two Art Sanity curators seem to like especially feature drawings — view their tastes here and here.

artFido.com  has 426,000 followers. ArtFido invites you to tag your art images with @artFido #artFido or #art for a possible feature.

Magic Gallery, with nearly 10K followers, asks you to tag your art photos and videos with #magicgallery for their curators to view and share.

The Art Shed tag your art with #theartshed for a chance to be featured.

Art of Visuals, color photography–tag with #Artofvisuals or #AOV for feature.

GALLERY_OF_BW, black and white photography–tag your images with #gallery_of_bw

AARTISTIC_DREAMERS, with over 76,000 followersfeatures talented artists and illustrators. To get their attention hastag your artworks with #aartistic_dreamers for a chance to be featured.

ART_SPOTLIGHT, with 320,000 followers, invites artists to tag their art images with #Art_Spotlight for a feature.

Also, New York City artist Sarah Rosado, SRARTWORK on Instagram with nearly 60,000 followers, offers to share your artwork if you tag it with #srartwork

 

If you’re looking for more ways to get your art featured on social media platforms, on art blogs and in art magazines, get our e-list here and here.

 

 

 

These Celebrities Bought Art From Artists on Instagram!

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The theme here of late has been selling art on Instagram.  Just last week I posted details on how to create a shop for art sales on your Instagram profile–read the article here. I also featured the news that artist Caia Matheson sold one of her paintings within one hour of creating her shop and posting her first painting to Instagram–you’ll find the article here.

So I was wowed by the news that celebrities Lindsay Lohan and Leonardo DiCaprio purchased art from artists after discovering their work on Instagram.

After reading my articles, New York artist Jane Dell asked what is the difference–a  link to her website on her Instagram profile or the shop? So the answer is that no matter your method, buyers see your work and buy it on Instagram! Just make it easy for them.

Artist Sold Painting Within One Hour of Posting to Instagram With This Sales App

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On Monday, I posted my article about using the Spreesy app to add a shop to sell your art on Instagram–read the article here.

Artist Caia Matheson read my article, signed up for the Spreesy app and posted her first painting for sale on Instagram.  It sold within one hour! Caia also sent a “Big Thanks” to me for introducing her to this sales app! You can see it on your Instagram post.

 

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Caia Matheson also added the link to her Spreesy store to her Instagram profile, as recommended. She uses a lot of great hash tags to her posts to help get the word out too. Congrats, Caia!

 

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I got an offer on my painting, also within one hour of posting to Instagram–but it’s still available in my Spreesy store here.

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Post Your Art For Sale On Instagram: Add Your Shoppable Store With this App

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I’ve simplified the steps below, but you can find full tutorials on the Spreesy site if you need more details.

To Get Started–

Sign up for a free Spreesy account here. In your Spreesy dashboard, select your currency, such as United States Dollar(USD), add your email contact address and your PayPal account email address. Now you are set up to sell your art on Instagram.

It’s recommended that you add your Spreesy store link to your Instagram profile.

After you have set up your Spreesy account,  post an image of your artwork directly on Instagram and in your post’s caption box list the price of your artwork (like $290), a quantity (like 1x) and add the line of text: anyone can purchase by commenting with their email address. It’s that easy!

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Each time you add these 3 things to your Instagram image–a price, quantity, and the line of text anyone can purchase by commenting with their email address–  the item will appear in your Spreesy store. Here is my Spreesy store. I’ve added one artwork to get started–

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So, the next time you snap a photo of your art to share on Instagram,  in your image caption box add:
Price defined with a currency symbol (like $) followed by a number. Simply include your product’s price somewhere in the post’s caption. You can use the following currency symbols followed by the price, such as $99, €99, ₪99, ¥99, £99, or ฿99.
Quantity is defined as a number followed by an x. If your quantity is 1 painting, just include “1x” somewhere in your post’s caption. If your quantity is 10 prints, include 10x in your caption.

Always include in your caption that anyone can purchase by commenting with their email address.

Shipping If you want to specify shipping costs:

1) For domestic shipping, simply include a flat rate shipping cost in your product’s total price.  If you’re selling a product for $15 and you want to charge an additional $5 for shipping within your country, then the total price of your product should be $20.

2) If you want to charge extra for international shipping just include the format +$15. So if international shipping costs an additional $15, just type +$15 somewhere in your post’s caption. Make sure to use a plus sign before the international shipping cost such as +$5 or +£5.

Here’s my Instagram post and you can see how it appears in my Spreesy store in the image above:

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The Best Times to Post to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Instagram

This infographic shows how the ideal days and times to post to each social media platform has shifted over time and as platforms such as Instagram become more and more popular.

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Tag Your Art Images on Instagram to be Featured by Contemporary Online Art Magazine

 

Follow Marie Kazalia on Instagram http://www.instagram.com/MarieKazalia

Follow Marie Kazalia on Instagram http://www.instagram.com/MarieKazalia 

 

About a month ago, I featured my article on how to tag your art images on Instagram to attract art buyers and collectors–read the article here. Readers shared my article to Facebook 93 times directly from this site.

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Now I’m sharing a new tip for artists on how to tag your art images for a feature by Arte Fuse, a contemporary online art magazine. Arte Fuse magazine is active on Instagram where they interact and feature artists. Follow Artefuse on Instagram and tag your art work images with #artefuse to be featured by the magazine! It’s that easy.

Online art magazines, art blogs and print magazines each have submission guidelines.

Find links to 60 pages of Art magazines, art blogs, podcasts, art directories and more on our e-list of art publication resources for artists here and here.

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Tagging your Art Images On Instagram to Attract Art Buyers

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I first used Instagram at the new Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland a couple of years ago, where I snapped photos of the art on the walls using my iPad camera and sent them off to my Instagram account using the museum’s WiFi (I had to ask for their password).  I thought I’d taken the time to type in the name of each artist in each photo description. Reviewing those images now (here) on my Instagram profile, I  notice blurry shots not edited out and abbreviated artist names. My picture-taking activity bundled up in my excitement of walking the galleries and viewing the art. It never occurred to me to take the time to add image tags to any of those photos. Likewise, at the Carnegie International in Pittsburgh, where the huge galleries held much more and much larger artworks, I snapped and sent my photos to Instagram without tagging them.

Today, viewing Instagram images posted by others, I’ve notice their use of image tags, such as the place tags #ArtBasel #ScopeArtFair used by those in Miami and #Brighton #thingstodoinBrighton and #openstudios used by artist Caia Matheson in the UK.

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Instagram allows up to 30 tags per image. Amid the many image tags used to describe the art medium or technique, artists also tag to get the attention of buyers, with:  #affordableart #artbuyers #artcollectors #buyart #artforsale #paintingforsale #printforsale #onlineshop #interiordesign #giftideas #handpainted #Christmasgiftideas #sellart #artsales

Taking more interest in Instagram and tagging, I noticed an article by Brandon Gaille, on 6 Keys to Getting more Instagram Likes, and learned that Facebook owns Instagram. According to Gaille, “Instagram is the hottest site right now. It was experiencing phenomenal growth when Facebook acquired the site and even thereafter the growth spree seems to be unhindered.”

I also want to share Dan Zarella of HubSpot’s huge infographic on how using more tags on your Instagram photos gets you more likes:

bloginfographicGetting-More-Instagram-Likes

Right Side Art Call: Instagram Photo-based Contest and Exhibition

I have enjoyed snapping shots using my iPad and sending the pics to Instagram to share. Recently, I shared shots of paintings hanging in museum exhibitions using Instagram. Many artists and others snap pics from everyday life with their cell-phones and iPads. There are plenty of apps available for iPad for adjusting and altering these images. The VSCOcam app is used to set exposure on iPad, iPhone and other devices, while the Nightcap app is for taking photos at night using your devices. There are many other apps– some are free, some retail for as low as .99 cents. Ask your Facebook friends what apps they use to discover more.

Participate in an Instagram exhibition to connect with others using photo-based device apps.

Right Side Art has two photography based Instagram contests and exhibitions each year. Their next deadline is August 2014.

Learn more via this link: http://www.rightsideart.com/call

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(image at top courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net)

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