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Workspaces for Creative Global Nomads / Digital Nomads

ImpactHub-map-notext

No matter where we live in the world, we all visit websites set up by artists and creatives based around the globe. With multinational organizations such as Impact Hub it’s becoming increasingly easier for travelers, who often refer to themselves as Digital Nomads, to physically travel from their homes in cold, snowy climates to live as expatriates in warmer and relatively less expensive countries and easily maintain their online presence–be it social media activity, keeping-up their own websites or blogs, or expanding their online income streams to pay their living expenses while on the road. Impact Hub currently has 77 open co-working centers around the world. Impact Hub considers themselves a community of entrepreneurs, creatives, and professionals who use the workspaces and wi-fi connections for a monthly fee, or even rent a permanent desk, so that Digital Nomads have a space to drink coffee with vibrant people while growing their online businesses.

Another such space in San Francisco’s Chinatown is 1920C a “coworking collective and creativity hub” offering workspace and gallery space to global creative nomads.

Digital Nomads traveling to Cape Town, South Africa can get shared office space, a desk, internet / wi-fi, office facilities, and coffee at MiniOffice and other spaces coming soon via the Co-Working Community of South Africa.

Do visual artists really need to stay in one place to create?

Point B Art has “Worklodges” which are centers in cities throughout the world specifically for “globally mobile creative professionals,” to encourage “trans-disciplinary and cross-cultural exchanges.”  Worklodges contain casual communal gathering areas such as cafe areas and rooftop gardens, office spaces for arts related businesses, reference libraries, presentation areas for private showings, conference rooms and lecture halls, shorter-term work/live studio lofts, as well as private, longer term studios for in-house local artists as a unique resource to visiting Creative Global Nomads. Each Worklodge is unique, with a small number (8 to 25) private work/live studio lofts for transient lodgers to quickly begin working upon arrival.
Point B Worklodges contain Work/live studio lofts such as in this diagram —

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A Worklodge studio is composed of a good living space and a good working space. These work/live studios were built as “Solotats,” that is, habitats for solo exploration that offer flexibility and maximize creative out-put. The studios contain big, long work tables and clear walls with lots of room to pin things up, lay things out– space for physical thinking processes.

Because they are all mid-career professionals, the lodgers in these Worklodges know that the other creative people there are in a similar place in their lives. One of the benefits of staying at a Point B Worklodge is that one becomes part of a network of creative people around the world who are working and traveling abroad.

Point B is transitioning from their former space, to a new location in Brooklyn, New York, while they are also in the process of opening a new Worklodge in Lisbon, Portugal and will begin taking applications this coming in the Spring or Summer of 2016.

 You can find out many more details on the Point B Art website here.
 I first learned of Point B when they began following my @TransArtGuide Twitter account.  Follow Point B on Twitter here.
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The Fantastical Human Art Forms of Olga Zavershinskaya aka Armene

Drop, Olga Zavershinskaya

Drop, Olga Zavershinskaya

Russian fine art photographer and artist Olga Zavershinskaya aka Armene lives and works in the Czech Republic. Olga has exhibited internationally and is represented by the Art Gallery AFK in Lisbon, Portugal. Her work contains combinations and contrasts–the beautiful in conjunction with the unbeautiful–as in Drop, above, where the controlled perfection of the lovely neck, face and hair of the model unexpectedly expands into an erratic splash of wet black ink, and in Dark Thoughts, where the model falls forward streaming ink from her hair in impossibly suspended lines, runs and drizzles.

Dark Thoughts, Olga Z

Dark Thoughts, Olga Z

Jellyfish, Olga Zavershinskaya

Jellyfish, Olga Zavershinskaya

In Olga’s photographic image titled Jellyfish, the diaphanous fluther of seaforms float as a backdrop for a lavender colored corpse-like human figure, the combination in such a scene causes wonderment in the viewer at the possibilities of this visual narrative.

Angle VI, Olga Zavershunskaya

Angle VI, Olga Zavershinskaya

Olga Zavershinskaya, master of anatomy, photographs the human form in elegant nudes, solo and minimal, as in Angle VI. Or nudes with props, such as the texture of the sheer wet fabric simultaneously covering and revealing the figure in Transparency IV.

Transparency IV

Transparency IV

Fantastical works of fantasy, as in the lush Peacock with several cyclopic eyes that gaze back at the viewer while other orbs in the image stray off to one side or the other and up, in one of Olga’s most enigmatic and surrealistic scenes, recalling tales of fantastic Magic Realism in a puzzlement at how she could have created the image!

Peacock, Olga Zavershinskaya

Peacock, Olga Zavershinskaya

Olga’s visualizations start her off on her use of the model to realize her unusual ideas and creative concepts, that she completes with with skillful post-production processing methods to produce the final images.

Spots, Olga Z

Spots, Olga Zavershinskaya

 

What You Can Learn From This Artist’s Approach

After I accepted Dan St. Andrei’s friend request on Facebook, he sent me this note:

Thanks for accept, Marie!
It is also a great pleasure for me to invite you to visit my online portfolio. Your opinion will be challenging for me.
Have a nice weekend,
Dan
www.danandrei.com

dan st. andrei photography portfolio
danandrei.com
Dan St. Andrei in an art director, photographer and painter specializing in advertising, art photography and graphic design. Dan is based in Lisbon, Portugal, and also have studios in Miami, FL and Bucharest, Romania.

His line “Your opinion will be challenging for me” caught my attention. It signaled his professionalism and confidence. His site is impressive too!

Dan’s approach impressed me.  Some artists can learn from his approach.

Here are a couple of examples of how *not* to present your art–

I’ll never forget one artist who asked me to review her site to select art for one of my projects. I took the time to go over her site and copied one of her titles directly from her website then let her know that I could use that one for the project.  She immediately emailed her reply  *that’s not my title!”   Her site is in such a mess that her art is mis-titled and she used that as impetus for lashing out. Another artist sent me a PDF of 100 numbered images to review. There were problems with his numbering on his images. Midway down the list numbers began repeating so that two completely different images had the same number.  It may sound harsh, but most would have trashed the PDF and not replied. But I was kind enough to reply and inform him of the problem. In his responding reply, rather than correct his numbering system and resend the corrected PDF,  he sent me instructions that I should count –1,2,3, etc. Like I needed a lesson in how to count to 100!

Get your materials in order before sending them out. If you need help you will find my ebook guide for artist making submissions  and submission resource lists here.

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