Monochrome Images: Argentinian Photographic Artist Jose Luis Gambande

Orleans 2, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

Although photographic artist Jose Luis Gambande chooses the subjects for his monochrome photographs on his weekly walks in cities he visits–last month he made a huge quantity of photographs on a trip to Spain and France–he does not consider himself a Street Photographer. “Usually I walk and shoot in the city once a week,” says Jose, “I take buildings and cityscapes because I like to register those things that are permanent–always there– around us. I am not a Street Photographer in the sense of taking the city movement, or the street dynamic life. I like the steady things in the city, the landscape of the permanent.”

Paris #2, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

Jose Luis Gambande, enjoys working in digital monochrome, treating each black and white photograph like a unique thing–a unique opportunity to make each image something special.

A LA OFICINA, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

He also loves the discovery process on the streets of cities and during post-processing of this images, stating that — “Frequently, when I begin processing an image taking off colors I discover a new shadow, a new light, a new bright that was never seen when taking the photo.”

 

 

BARRIO, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Jose Luis Gambande was born in Argentina 58 years ago. “I am an electrical engineering and work as that for my living,” says Jose, who is married and has two sons. He recalls how,in his childhood he studied fine arts and enjoyed painting–first, with brushes and paints and lastly digital painting using inkscape software.

 

CARRERA, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Always intrigued by photography but never thought he could make it, Jose only began making photographs six months ago. “I began shooting just for curiosity and found it likes me,” says Jose.

ARBOL, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

As Jose says of his image making philosophy– “By the way, my knowledge of photography techniques is yet very limited. I like to take a good shot (with a good composition) and then make some digital operations (as little as possible) turning the image to a higher level of complexity and impact. I use an image editor. I don’t like to give a “message” with my photos, only an aesthetical representation, and maybe discover a new thing or a new view in a well-known place.”

ESTUDIO 17312, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

 

Jose Luis Gambande offers Limited Edition prints directly from his website here. He is also available for assignments.

Jose has open edition prints available in his Saatchi Online portfolio: https://www.saatchiart.com/gambande
Follow Jose on Instagram here and on Facebook here.

SILLAS Y MESAS, photograph by Jose Luis Gambande

Advertisements

Converting Your Color Photos to Fine Art Quality Black and White

Ancient Bristlecone, photograph by Harold Davis from book The Photographer's Black and White Handbook, published by Monacelli Studio

Ancient Bristlecone, photograph by Harold Davis from book The Photographer’s Black and White Handbook, published by Monacelli Studio

You probably shoot images with your camera phone and then make adjustments or add effects using various apps, including one or more for converting your color photos to black and white (aka monochrome).  Many digital cameras also have options for converting color image captures to black and white. But those quick conversions are sort of one size fits all, and probably won’t produce the highest quality results for your specific image. Plus wouldn’t you like to know how to make color adjustments to get the best black and white results from the start. If you’d like to step up your quality and gain more control, master photographer Harold Davis has a new book to guide you. The title of the book is The Photographer’s Black & White Handbook.  The cover price is $35.00 but the book is currently available for $17.88 for a soft cover print copy and only $13.79 for a Kindle version.

Harold Davis, The Photographer's Black and White Handbook, published by Monacelli Press

Harold Davis, The Photographer’s Black and White Handbook, published by Monacelli Press

 

The book will guide you in post-processing your images using such tools as are available in Lightroom, Photoshop, and Topaz plug-ins. Not all are necessary. Each image layer is processed uniquely to your personal artistic vision, and the guidebook will get you started, answer many of your questions, and assist you in countless ways to help increase your understanding for better results. Of course, you still have to put in the time and effort. If you are already proficient using post process programs, and want to explore more possibilities for image effects, the last chapter of this book–CREATIVE B & W EFFECTS–covers such things as tinting and toning, split toning using various tools, selective color and hand painting, selective focus, solarizing, simulated infrared, vintage, antique and film effects, adding borders and so much more.

Rooftops of Paris, photograph by Harold Davis from book The Photographer's Black and White Handbook, pg 196-197, split-toned image, book published by Monacelli Studio

Rooftops of Paris, photograph by Harold Davis from book The Photographer’s Black and White Handbook, pg 196-197, split-toned image, book published by Monacelli Studio

 

Harold Davis’ website is called the Digital Field Guide https://www.digitalfieldguide.com

You can view more b & w photos from the book in my Niume article here.

The author very recently talked about his book, conversion processes, and showed images in a B & H Photo video presentation  –