June Design Challenge: new call to artists, textile designers, and painters

frontrow

The Front Row Society has a new call to artists, textile designers, and painters to take part in their June design challenge.

They’re interested in Primitive Flowers and all the beautiful paintings the expressionists created in the beginning of the 20th century, visual and lyrical abstraction, distorted imagery, and vivid colors and shapes. Art based on experiences and emotions rather than physical reality. Work that seeks to express perceptions of nature rather than exact representations. They are looking for a naïve approaches using bold lines, clear layers, impasto, wild brush work, simplification and abstraction that transcends representational and realistic aesthetics.

 

As their new website is under development, at this time they are taking submissions via email. Please send an email to design@frontrowsociety.com to receive the submission package.,

Submissions end 29/06/16

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Inkster for Artists, Musicians, Takes Only 10% From Your Sales

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inkster, written in all lowercase letters, funded their startup site with a Kickstarter campaign.

inkster encompasses all aspects of social media and eCommerce into one beautiful place where artists can promote, educate, sell, and communicate.

Anyone creative can use inkster–Musicians, painters, graphic designers, tattoo artists, graffiti artists, fashion designers, animators and the list goes on. While inkster.com sorts the content you add into categories, it also allows you to individually tag your work as you see fit.

It’s free for artists to sign up. inkster will only take 10% from sales transactions, strictly as a facilitation fee, because Toronto-based inkster CEO Danny Gibson and COO Rob Anderson think that independent artists deserve a fair chance at managing a successful career and want to provide them with an economically viable platform.

Why is this site named inkster? When broken down, ink-ster represents what an artist is. The “ster” suffix on words such as hipster, punkster, ravester have the following meanings–

1. denoting a person engaged in or associated with a particular activity or thing. Example: “gangster”

2. denoting a person having a particular quality.  Example:  “youngster”

When you put the word “ink” –one of, if not the oldest medium used by artists–in front of “ster,” you get inkster.  Even historic composers such as Beethoven and Mozart– who didn’t even have recording equipment– used pen and ink to record their creations.

“Being an inkster is essentially being an artist or creative individual.” – Rob Anderson

 

inkster is just one of thousands on our E-list of places to sell your art–get it here and here.

 

 

Art Prize Offers Cash and International Exhibitions for 100 Painters and Photographers

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Some artists may be interested in the Donkey Art Prize, which is in its 3rd year. In addition to selected prize winners, 100 finalist artists will exhibit their work in international locations in cities such as Milan, Italy and in Miami, Florida and Tokyo, Japan.

As with the first two years of the prize, artists may enter artworks of painting and photography.

If you think this is something you’d like to participate in, you can get a 20% Early bird discount off the entry fee of € 35,00 (which makes it 28 Euros or $31.95USD) if you sign-up before February 20th.

The application will be available online until May the 5th 2015.

There will be awards for four art-works with a 2,000 euro prize each.

As secondary awards selected artists will receive merchandise provided by two
sponsors — Maimeri, Italian manufacturer of artists watercolor and oil paints and the Italian Momodesign. There are also solo exhibitions in the young Core Gallery in Naples, Italy

The Donkey Art Prize operates on a democratic selection process with blind jurying by critics, curators, collectors and journalists who vote on artworks.

The Prize is open to all artists without boundaries. Apply online directly on the website.
Read the full regulations on the website for the prize here.
Follow the Prize on the social networks Facebook, Instagram, Twitter.

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The Artist Marketing Resources web stores provides visual artists with resources to help build their art careers. Visit the store to find an extensive art galleries e-list, an e-list of art magazines and art blogs accepting artist submissions, an e-list of art consultants, an e-list of art print publishers, an e-list of art licensing companies and artist agents, an e-list of photography agents and resources, an art sales e-list, an e-book guide to making artist submissions, and our e-postcard marketing plans. If you prefer to use PayPal shop in our store here, and if you would like to use a credit card for online purchases click here for #artistresources in our 2nd webstore.

 

 

Artist Agent X *Golden Girlz* Promo Pics via ArtistSpot

Mixed media collage artist Agent X submitted his art images to ArtistSpot on recommendation of Artist Marketing Resources. ArtistSpot now features the Art of Agent X on their site.

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ArtistSpot created these promotional images and sent the images to the artist to use to promote his ArtistSpot prints and t-shirts.

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View the entire Agent X collection available on ArtistSpot.

Kathryn Arnold — Poetic Mark-Making On Canvas

Each Imprisoned Flutter Extends Delicately to the Horizon, Mallarme,Oil on Stretched Canvas, 54 w x 66h, Kathryn Arnold

Each Imprisoned Flutter Extends Delicately to the Horizon, Mallarme,
Oil on Stretched Canvas, 54 w x 66 h, Kathryn Arnold

Kathryn Arnold works in her studio in San Francisco. It is a large space with a skywell that keeps track of the time. Her work contains two intertwining veins. One is filled with large, colorful oils on canvas. The other vein includes drawings that are black and white mixed media works on paper. Both display the density and layered mark-making that points to artistic process and content.

Kathryn Arnold’s Artist Statement: 

“The paintings are a result of intuitive nonobjective processes and contain my search for visual “magic.” The sense of touch and chaotic energy of color and marks play an important role in building up layers that function to create an encompassing, enveloping field and bewildering space. The grid at times becomes a reference point and the intrinsic relating of parts form poetry; an interplay between subjective and objective realities.”

Kathryn Arnold has an MFA degree, exhibits nationally in galleries, universities and art centers, and is a recipient of several fellowships, grants and awards, including an NEA Regional Fellowship. Kathryn’s work is included in numerous public and private collections.

View the artist’s extensive portfolio of paintings on the her website http://www.kathrynarnold.com/

 

Dolls, Masks, Zombies, Devils, Skulls and Day of the Dead Skeletons in the Pastel Paintings of Barbara Rachko

The Space Between, Barbara Rachko

To say that her pastel paintings are skillful is truly an understatement! New York City artist Barbara Rachko has perfected her artistic style working from her large collection of Mexican and Guatemalan folk art – masks, carved wooden animals, papier mâché figures, and toys – to create pastel paintings that combine reality and fantasy and depict personal narratives.

If you are wondering how this artist achieves such fine detail and a photographic quality in her pastel paintings, you can find out more about her techniques by following her blog appropriately named Colored Dust. The artist also share a lot about her art-making on her Facebook page, which you can Like to follow her there.

The multi-talented Barbara is a gifted photographic artist as well, and currently represented by the New York City art gallery HP Garcia.

The Sovereign, Barbara Rachko

False Friends, Barbara Rachko

 

Paranoia, Barbara Rachko

Effigy, Barbara Rachko

Lena Levin’s Ten A Penny Experiment for Making Art Sales

Strawberries,  Oil on archival canvas panel, 12 x 9 inches, Lena Levin, October 2011.

Ten a penny experiment, by Lena Levin

The “ten-a-penny” has been designed as an experiment in “gift economy” — I wanted to make original oil paintings, even if smaller ones, available for a broader range of collectors, especially in today’s tighter economy.

The essence of the experiment is that the artist sets a suggested minimum for any painting offered for sale, and lets the collector decide how much they wish to pay and can afford. I added free shipping to keep matters as simple as possible, and promised no auctioning: I take each and every offer equal or above the suggested minimum.

The experiment has been running on my website since October 2011, and this stage is about to end on April 13 (this date was set in advance), and has sold more than 30 paintings.  I’ve decided to confine this experiment to my smaller works on panels, 9”x12” or less (mainly still lifes, but also some plein air landscape studies), while continuing to sell my larger paintings in a more conventional way. Among other things, this allowed me to keep the shipping prices in check, because these sizes fit into flat rate envelopes. The suggested minimum was set at $25.00. The actual offers varied from $25.00 to $250.00, with the average about $50.00. Most collectors fell into two groups: those who took me up on my offer or raised the price very slightly, and those who either doubled or tripled the suggested minimum.

With a single exception, all of them came to my website from Google+ (which is my only social network account). For the first several months of the experiment, I changed the small set of paintings offered in the experiment weekly or bi-weekly, announcing each change on Google+.

For the last three months, I offered a considerably larger set of paintings without any regular changes. Predictably, the first approach is more effective as far as the number of sales are concerned, but not necessarily so in terms of money: I know for a fact that some people had been saving money to make a better offer, which would have been impossible in the environment of bi-weekly or weekly changes.

To read more about the experiment, and to view the paintings still available, please visit my “Ten a Penny” page at www.lenalevin.com/gal/Give .

Amazon Store: New Oil Painting on Canvas From Spain

Marta Fuster Barutell lives and paints in Spain.  She recently varnished several of her oil paintings on canvas, which she described as arduous task–keeping out dust etc.

Her varnishing session was a success and we are pleased to offer the artist’s oil paintings in our Amazon store.  Today, newly listed in the store is her oil painting titled El Peso De La Luz, Estudio #3 (The Weight of Light, Study #3). View it on Amazon here:  http://amzn.com/B007DH6854

El Peso De La Luz, Estudio #3 (The Weight of Light, Study#3),oil painting on canvas by Marta Fuster Barutell

El installation view Peso De La Luz, Estudio #3 (The Weight of Light, Study#3) by Marta Fuster Barutell

Detail view 1 of oil painting titled El Peso De La Luz, Estudio #3 (The Weight of Light, Study#3) by Marta Fuster Barutell

El Detail view 2 of oil painting titled Peso De La Luz, Estudio #3 (The Weight of Light, Study#3) by Marta Fuster Barutell

Blogs About Painting

Richard Pousette-Dart

Image via Wikipedia

While researching a couple of amazing artists, I found a few blogs about painting that I want to share. The blog champagne.constant features a series of quality images of the paintings of Bernard Frize, and the KLOG blog has a feature on the paintings of Richard Pousette-Dart that is worth viewing.

Online Art Sales

Sale

Image by markhillary via Flickr

Artists, if you’ve had sales on Zatista or other sites, I’d like to hear about your experiences.

Yesterday, I received an email notification that one of my paintings sold on Zatista.  A 12 x 16 x 1.5 inch canvas of  poured alkyd oil paint colors  from 2010, titled Abstract Plaid #1, sold for $300.USD + $25. shipping.

Honestly, I have posted my art to online stores since early 2009 and this is my first sale of any of my original art. Over the past year, I’ve only had sales of cards and postcards on the UK-based print-on-demand site Create Today.

[ If you are not on Zatista or Create Today, and would like to sign up, here are the links– Zatista www.zatista.com + Create Today www.createtoday.com ]

I can’t help but wonder why sales occurred for me on Zatista and Create Today, but none on other similar sites? I know that at both Zatista and Create Today I’ve had ongoing communications with the site owners, and none on most other art sales sites. So perhaps the answer is presence and interaction, as well as marketing and promotions?

I like to think that personal attention does make that difference, as I work to set up my Transmedia Artist Amazon store–lining up some great artists with which to open the store. Attending to all the details myself. If you are an artist with an interest in selling on Amazon–read my PDF file just for artists, here:

https://acrobat.com/#d=XocsRrY4RXndngT2ZTe-Cw

and please share the link with other artists!

New York: Photographic Artist Ventiko–Entering Her Version of Reality

Ventiko is the most extraordinary photographic artist I have even encountered! Her photos look like Renaissance oil paintings, and amazingly enough the elaborate sets for her photo shoots she constructs herself, often from mountains of newspapers, or hundreds of milk cartons. In this article about her processes, some of her lighting secrets are revealed as well. This full article was a published on the VASA blog:

http://vasa-project.com/blog/2011/05/new-york-photographic-artist-ventiko-entering-her-version-of-reality/

New York: Photographic Artist Ventiko–Entering Her Version of Reality 

Ventiko’s photographic images remind one of paintings by master Renaissance artists like Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Raphael. Ventiko creates the sfumato and chiaroscuro-like painting effects in her photos by skillfully directing photo lights on her portrait subjects amid rich shadows.

Ventiko credits development of her photographic style with the influences of a Black and White photography course and an in-depth art history course, both completed during her first year at John Herron Art School, where she slept days and “obsessively worked on prints” each night in the computer lab or in the school darkroom.

The following year, Ventiko began working as an apprentice for her Maestro, photographer Tony Clevenger.  Ventiko describes her apprenticeship with Clevenger as “a lucky period in my life. Maestro taught me how to be an assistant, but more importantly he taught and encouraged me to become a photographer. Loading Polaroid backs,120 and 220 rolls, 4×5 sheet film, and running an E6 processor were daily occurrences. As was sweeping the floors. The greatest gift I was given was trust, because he taught me how to use the Dynalite strobe lighting system and a film Hasselblad camera and then gave me these tools to take home and experiment with.”

It was during this Dynalite strobe period that Ventiko began constructing sets for her portrait subjects to occupy, incorporating everyday found objects, clothing and drapery.

“After mastering the Dynas, Maestro taught me how to use Broncolors, and a year and a half ago I purchased some of my own. When I moved to New York, settling in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, my images darkened–both visually and metaphorically.” 

One of Ventiko’s dark images, The Nightmare, which won an award on the art news site ArtSlant, can be viewed in a portfolio of her artwork on her website www.ventiko.com

“The Nightmare investigates relationships depicted in Christian art from the Gothic to Baroque epochs. It is not based specifically on any one work, dream or nightmare. I hope the image is beautiful so that the viewer is disarmed and open to the meaning of the work,” Ventiko stated.

Another of Ventiko’s images, Gyspy, depicts her muse, which Ventiko described meeting.  “My oldest friend Jaybird and I dressed up and went to see Armen Ra perform on his Theremin at the Gershwin Hotel. Fifteen minutes into the performance, from my peripheral, I saw light enter the back of the room and as the doors opened a figure in black ascended the stairs. One of the only seats open was on the second row from the front on the aisle next to me, where she took her seat–a tall brunette wearing a short black dress, black veil and black leather opera length gloves, oh my. So not to be rude, I didn’t acknowledge her presence. Fine, I was nervous. After Armen Ra finished his piece, he left the accompanying stereo playing and walked out of the room. After the silence became uncomfortably awkward, I turned to Gypsy and said “hmmm…is that it? It’s a bit unfinished don’t you think?” To which she replied “Well, no, that is what makes it wonderful, leaving an element of curiosity. (Perhaps I ought to tell you that Gypsy lives her days in the body of a man and at night she comes out to inspire me.) We continued the conversation in the lobby. Thank heavens Jaybird was there to give me the courage to ask Gypsy if she would allow me to photograph her. She said she would and we exchanged information.”

Their meeting led to an outing to Jamaica, Queens, were Ventiko and Gypsy found a sparkly red taffeta ball gown for their upcoming shoot. “The red ball gown was the first article of clothing that we purchased together. Seeing Gypsy try the dress on moved me deeply, as she was wearing her daily costume of a man.”  Ventiko began to question “what is right, what is wrong, who says so, and why something is accepted as truth. For the first time in my life I related on a personal level with someone’s struggle with identity and the shame and guilt brought on by others, and that coincided with my self-acceptance and self-expression.”

Ventiko kept the gown on displayed in her studio. One day, leaving the studio, walking outside in her trash filled neighborhood, “some discarded newspaper took to the air via a gust of wind. That was my Eureka moment. It was then that everything made sense. I wanted to both clean up the trash in the streets, and create something beautiful and representational of my life.” Thus began Ventiko’s late 2008, mid 2009 newspaper project and the creation of the first newspaper costumes.

“The newspaper project started small. I was collecting newspapers from the neighborhood bodegas’ trash piles (The New York Post or The Daily News) and keeping only the black and white pages. To maximize the amount of black and white pages, I started collecting The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal from the city’s

bodegas late at night and schlepping them back on the train.  These newspapers represent the values of the Machine and by manipulating each page of black and white print I visually exercise my Civil Disobedience against the accepted societal norms. After I had accumulated copious amounts of newspaper, it then took me three days–twisting and manipulating the” norm” into something that is desirable– to create the paper skirt for the photograph A Display.”

In Ventiko’s loft, the newspapers she had collected became an organic sculpture that she lived with, and in, for 9 months. “During that time the newspaper set continued to reshape itself into a variety of forms–it was a dragon tail that became a centipede that took over the hallway, until finally cremated in a 20 ft trench in Montauk.”

Another photo set Ventiko built in her studio, came about when “a friend of mine tipped me off that a woman emptying a storage unit in Long Island was giving away props and costumes for one day only.  I rented a car and dashed out there and was rewarded with 4 parachutes, army netting, bags and two red velvet deco style chairs.”

Ventiko then located some free sand (hauling not included) and built a set in her studio using  two of the parachutes suspended from the ceiling along with the army netting, and created a ten by ten foot sand pit. “The set became a fixture of my life for several shoots during a three week period. When it was time to strike the set, my two cats were quite disappointed, as they hadn’t needed to use their litter box in quite some time. Perhaps you might be interested in the story of the octopus I got down the street for the photograph Julia? Let’s just say the result was a great holiday card and very nasty infection…for me.”

Ventiko is currently creating new work in two very different series. “In the fall of 2010 my mother began chemotherapy and eventually had a mastectomy to treat her breast cancer.  This awakened in me many emotions that had been suppressed. The photographic works I am currently creating are a continuation of themes and motifs introduced in Tenebrism– birth, death, rebirth, loss, suffering, pain, remorse, shame, humility, guilt, fear etc.  Recently I created Le Mort inspired by Le Mort de Marat by Jacques Louis David.”

In her second series, Ventiko creates wearable costumes out of recycled milk cartons from a nearby elementary school. ”The costumes have been used for both performances and photo shoots. Currently I have two full body dresses/robes, halos, collars and panties made from milk cartons and am constantly creating more. I must create something with my hands or I feel unfulfilled and restless,” Ventiko explained. “Each day I must do something related to photography.  That can be shooting, editing, research, visiting museums, galleries and art fairs, processing information gathered, or creating sets.” When a portrait subject steps into Ventiko’s studio, they enter her version of reality. This reality is most often accompanied by the classical music of Erik Satie, costumes, wigs and assuming a character. “The set, people, props, costumes, make up, and posing are created, chosen, decided upon, applied and directed by me. In the final stage, I create a work of art by using my camera, as if I were a painter, to capture the composition I have created from the vision in my mind. The final image is a portrait of the essence of the individual free of constraint.”

 

Weekend review: 3 artist blogs–


Caio Fern’s (aka Caio Fernandes) painting blog, Silent Spots,

www.silentspots.blogspot.com

contains images of his complex face paintings (beyond mere portraits), a link to his paintings featured in Beautiful/Decay Magazine–wow, congrats, Fern. (He has a novel too!). I couldn’t get enough so glad for more images of his art on Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/caiofernandes

 

Igor Lukyanov is an illustrator and artist from Ukraine who puts his blog http://igor-lukyanov.blogspot.com together as meticulously as he does his portraits. Watch time-lapsed videos of Igor drawing pin-up girl, an elf princess and more.


Melissa Cameron and her good friend Jill Herman explain the processes of creating their colorful jewelry in a video on the blog: www.melissacameron.net/blog.