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CD: Latest from Avant Guarde Sound Artist R. Weis — PARROT and PAPERBACK

J100

 

This R. Weis sound art is available from CD Baby here, where you can preview and share the tracks on Twitter, Facebook, via email and to other social media sites.

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Sound artist R. Weis presents PARROT & PAPERBACK a four-part composition created from samples of sounds made by Congo, an African Grey Parrot paired with the sound of a paperback book about the Congo jungle dropping on the floor.
Almost exactly four years ago, I wrote an article on the Sound Art of R. Weis. My article was published to other art sites. You can read the text, minus the images, here.
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R. Weis has composed with manipulated sound since the 1980s. Over the last 30 years, his works have been heard in many galleries and museums, on many US radio stations, and on radio in Europe, including on London’s Resonance FM. A self-taught artist, Weis’ compositions are fixed recordings, not performed live.
“PARROT & PAPERBACK” was created on MachFive Sampling Software and Digital Performer Sequencing Software. For more information, visit www.rweis.com.
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If you have videos, or other art media works, you can featured by sending via email to: mariekazalia@gmail.com

Latest Technorati Article and a glitch

R. Weis Excitable Audible Album Cover

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, sound artist R. Weis sent me his latest CD. After I listened to it, he sent his press release, and the jpegs of himself and his CD album cover I requested for my Technorati article.

I wrote my article and submitted it to Technorati news editors around midnight, expecting morning publication. The next morning the notice oddly absent. As the day progressed, I received no notice that my article had gone live. That afternoon, R. Weis emailed thanking me for the article. I hadn’t even known it had been published! I found my article and the noticed it had been published at 9:28 a.m., yet I had not received the automated email notice of publication.  I contacted the Technorati editors and received an immediate reply that they had experienced a glitch of two that morning.

Here is the article:

Sound Artist R. Weis Makes Music From Everyday Objects On New  EXCITABLE AUDIBLE CD

by Marie Kazalia for Technorati news

How Do You Get An Article On Your Art Published?

Five of my articles on artists were published by Yahoo! in one week. I know from talking with other Yahoo! contributors, that original subject matter for an article is a must.

My first article is on a Cleveland sound artist, and titled:  Cleveland: Chris Kulcsar- an Artist Who Uses Sound (If problems with the long link, try this short link: http://bit.ly/fcdSMG)

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7899522/cleveland_chris_kulcsar_an_artist_who.html

My second article, on a Pittsburgh sound artist, I titled– Pittsburgh: R. Weis – Compositions of Manipulated Sound (short link: http://bit.ly/gkZHfg)

My third Article published by Yahoo! is titled: New York: GeneFree Video Performance Art
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7900767/new_york_genefree_video_performance.html

My fourth article published: Germany: Light Art Photography
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7900825/germany_light_art_photography.html

My fifth article published by Yahoo!
Jeanne Bessette–Painting the Human Element

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/7910629/jeanne_bessettepainting_the_human_element.html

I originally wrote the first four articles for the VASA project blog (http://vasa-project.com).

When I began writing for the VASA project blog as a regular contributor, I established a goal to write on artists in *under-served* regions such as Pittsburgh and Cleveland.

Since I am a member of a large group of primarily Pittsburgh artists, I put the word out that I would be writing on Pittsburgh artists working in video, photography, sound art, and digital art. The name R. Weis came up rather quickly. His fast response to my email and his enthusiasm for the article made it a pleasure to work with him, which inspired me to complete the article that same day.

Contacting Cleveland sound artist Chris Kulcsar proved to be a bit more challenging. At the time he did not have a website, and little online presence. I actually had searched for another sound artist I had heard about in a news cast, when Kulcar’s name came up on his friend’s blog. The blogger put me in touch with Kulcar, who wanted to answer my questions for the article, but was building a new website and would have his bio/CV and artist statement on his site within a few weeks. I know that writing statements, updating CVs and bio information can be time-consuming, as is building a new website, so I agreed to wait.
Several weeks later, Chris supplied me with the link to his new site, and answered all my questions. (In the mean time, the major holidays had come and gone and my mother had died, so, in this case, the delay in hearing back from the artist was not a problem). However, I don’t recommend making someone wait six to eight weeks if they express an interest in writing an article on your art. Have your materials ready and send them right away.

For the GeneFree article, both artists graciously provided me with information and videos to view. Unfortunately, my mother died while I was working on the article, and so I had to attend to family matters. I ended up cutting my article on GeneFree short, and would have preferred to have written a lengthier article.

Working with all of the artists proved to be inspiring, and the articles flowed as I wrote them. I posted my articles to the VASA project blog with images and embedded videos. Yahoo! does not allow images unless the author of an article holds the copyright to the images, or has a license to use the images.

I am pleased that Yahoo! has accepted and published my articles.

So, how do you get an article on your own art published? Perhaps the best way to get started is to connect with a regular contributor of an appropriate art site. Leave a comment on one of their article, then follow-up with an email. If you can’t find an email address for a contributor you would like to work with, leave your email address and site link in your comment. Some art news sites have a form for you to complete to request a feature on your art.

I am especially interested in writing on photographic artists, video artists, sound artists, and digital artists in Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and greater areas. But, I have also written on New York artists, German artists, and North Carolina artists. Any artist working on an interesting project should be able to get an article on their work published no matter their geographic region.

Marie Kazalia MarieKazalia@gmail.com

Pittsburgh: R. WEIS – Compositions of Manipulated Sound

R. Weis, in collaboration with photographer Arthur Tress, created the sound for Requiem for a Paperweight that has been presented in installation form along with the physical photographs (view installation shots http://www.rweis.com/rweis/requiem.html),  and as a two-projector slide show, originally at University Art Museum, California State University Long Beach.  It has since traveled to The Bridgewater/Lustberg Gallery in NYC, to German museums including The Ludwig Forum – Stadt Aachen, and in slide-show form at the 1994 CMJ Music Marathon in NYC.  The sound score for Requiem for a Paperweight was also heard as part of Arthur Tress’ retrospective “Fantastic Voyage, Photographs 1956-2000” at The Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

“…a richly textured, haunting vision of life in the future…a dazzling morality play, its hero, the Everyman of late-20th-century corporate life. A stereotypically overworked, anonymous cog in the Japanese business machine, the protagonist exists in a high-tech, migraine-inducing netherworld of garish neon color, charts and lab equipment, glossy ads, and business statistics. Haunted by shadowy memories of family and childhood and elusive promises of health and happiness, he faces a future in which bankruptcy, unemployment, and forced retirement are the preludes to his own cosmic apotheosis in death. His desperate search for meaning is met only with shiny, deceptive dreams.
“Enhanced by the score of composer R. Weis, who works with language and manipulated sound, the installation format works brilliantly for Tress. The dark-painted walls and vivid light reinforce the impression that we are witnessing, as in a medieval chapel, a kind of contemporary morality play.” 
Peter Clothier
, ArtNews, 3/95

Requiem for a Paperweight Part One

Read the full article by Marie Kazalia, at:

http://vasa-project.com/blog/2011/02/pittsburgh-r-weiss-compositions-of-manipulated-sound/

Cleveland: Chris Kulcsar-an artist who uses sound

I just wrote and published an article on the work of Cleveland, Ohio sound artist Chris Kulcsar, that includes three embedded videos of his unusual sound and performance art. The article  was also published on the VASA-project blog.

Cleveland: Chris Kulcsar – an artist who uses sound

“In my work I mash up seemingly separate multimedia elements with the intent of creating a body of work that implies a post-historical fabrication of coherence. This poses a problem as I am offered a dizzying array of outside sources to pull from.”
from Chris Kulcsar’s website http://www.chriskulcsar.com

Most of Chris Kulcsar’s life he’s made art and played music, but in just the last few years has made the leap to combining these two activities. While attending graduate school, with “the prodding of instructors and colleagues” Chris was made to realize that skills gained from his band life– recording, organizing events, performing– could be applied to his artistic practice.

Older technology, such as cassette tapes and players, as a medium interest him– “digital doesn’t distort well, but with analog the imperfections, hisses, pops, & distortions are all built into the process”.
Chris Kulcsar is also interested in technology as a cultural marker, he commented– “During the course of my installation at Spaces (Cleveland) I watched as patrons in their early 20’s struggled with the cassettes and the players. This was something I hadn’t anticipated and I’m still processing its deeper ramifications”.

“To interact with the tapes open all 3 in different windows and play and pause to make your own mix”.
Instructions found on Chris Kulcsar’s website.

Try it here, by clicking *play* on all three videos above.

“The panda project dealt with issues of identity and how people put on roles and attitudes. The basic idea is that panda’s don’t exist and they are actually people wearing panda suits. In ancient times the modern equivalent of stoners got together and created the panda idea/costume as a way to get  away with being lazy .  The have existed, almost as a cult, ever since.  The project entailed drawings, videos, and performances. I abandoned the project in the summer of 2008 because I felt that pandas had become overly saturated in pop culture via the Beijing olympics and some kids cartoon. In the video in question that particular panda has found evangelical christianity and he’s giving it a test drive.”

photo, video, digital and sound artists

*“Transmedia”, moving beyond traditional forms of publication and networking.*

I’ve been invited to write for and now have a contributors’ account on the Transmedia blog to post my writing on photo, video, digital and sound artists, especially those in my geographic region.

As stated on their blog, “Transmedia” is VASA’s Blogging Project to connect people to events and people to people. “Transmedia” is  a global networking project publishing the work of artists, theorists, critics and others on an international scale transcending traditional media categories. The “Transmedia,” blog will cover photography, video, sound, digital art and theory. “Transmedia” will focus on artists, writers and theorists from north, south, central America, Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and New Zealand.
http://vasa-project.com/blog/

If you are a  photo, video, digital, or sound artist, especially in the regions that include Cleveland and Pittsburgh, I’d like to know what you are working on for possible inclusion in a blog article.
Feel free to email me, Marie Kazalia at : MarieKazalia@gmail.com