Collectives and Artist Led Projects: Artist-Created Exhibitions and Events

Individually, many artists work alone to build connections, buyers and collectors. Some artists work with us and use our artist submission services to get news of their available work out to collectors, galleries, and art consultants. Other artists create or join artist collectives for professional reasons, such as to share costs of publicity, exhibition spaces, and to develop a higher group profile.

There is an amazing creative variety in the ways members of various collectives come together to host projects, exhibitions, workshops and events.

The New York based Kolektiv1 art group sells tickets to one night wine, jazz, art, and dancing events to raise awareness and support for kolektiv1’s artists and their spring art shows.

Something Different Art Collective allows you to sign up to receive invitations to their party events.

Kollektiv Gallery not only curates and exhibits art, but instructs artists in the world of Crowdfunding and selling art. Collective Gallery uses Kickstarter to teach new artists how to fund a project. Their Fast Art workshop instructs artists in using empty spaces and making a project happen on any budget.

The Animamus Art Salon, created by the artist Ventiko, puts on such amazing group artist performances that their shows garnered them a feature in Interview Magazine, which you can read here.   Both the Animamus Art Salon and VERB Projects are about art in action and the act of making and participating. The VERB Projects artist led exhibitions and events offer an alternative approach within the contemporary art scene.  Artists spend time in a space creating new art specifically for Verb Projects.  Value is placed upon the artist’s engagement through working with a range of art and non-art sites, the dialogue between art object, the site and the role of the audience in it. Photos on their 12HRS tumblr blog and Up on the 5th floor  and C-PAGES blog document activities in their free pop-up event spaces where artists showcase their work.

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The Vox Populi artist run space in Philadelphia, which was founded in 1988, is an artist collective that seeks to support challenging and experimental work of under-represented artists. Vox Populi’s monthly exhibition schedule includes solo shows of members and guest artists, a curated video lounge, annual guest-curated shows and group shows that provide exposure for emerging artists.

(*‿*✿) Find more resources in the Artist Marketing Resources web store.

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Open Call for interactive multimedia, performance, video, and sound artists

Animamus Art Salon: A Living Gallery London

Open Call for interactive multimedia, performance, video, and sound artists
Deadline: 24 October 2013
Application fee: £10

Animamus Art Salon is currently seeking artists working in performance, video, and sound art to get involved in Animamus Art Salon: A Living Gallery London.

For the month of October 2013, Animamus Art Salon will be turning Apiary Studios into a playful and flexible community space for international artists and locals while offering programmed events all free of charge and open to the public.

Be a part of a unique collaborative art experiment, there is nothing else like this happening anywhere in London.  Get your work seen by an international audience and participate in our month of live art events.

Happenings will occur every evening in October, but not all projects will be accepted.

To apply:

Please go to http://www.animamusartsalon.com/open-call and follow the directions for submission of work samples

About Animamus Art Salon:

Animamus Art Salon was created by Ventiko in 2011 in New York City, with the mission to create a safe, supportive and inspiring environment for artists of all mediums to debut and discuss their current work while encouraging audience participation and simultaneously enabling a performance of ideas, which can not be repeated. Animamus Art Salon seeks, in this digital age, to create a physical meeting space that will serve to foster the exchange of ideas, facilitate discourse, and create a sense of community.

 

New York: Photographic Artist Ventiko–Entering Her Version of Reality

Ventiko is the most extraordinary photographic artist I have even encountered! Her photos look like Renaissance oil paintings, and amazingly enough the elaborate sets for her photo shoots she constructs herself, often from mountains of newspapers, or hundreds of milk cartons. In this article about her processes, some of her lighting secrets are revealed as well. This full article was a published on the VASA blog:

http://vasa-project.com/blog/2011/05/new-york-photographic-artist-ventiko-entering-her-version-of-reality/

New York: Photographic Artist Ventiko–Entering Her Version of Reality 

Ventiko’s photographic images remind one of paintings by master Renaissance artists like Michelangelo, Da Vinci and Raphael. Ventiko creates the sfumato and chiaroscuro-like painting effects in her photos by skillfully directing photo lights on her portrait subjects amid rich shadows.

Ventiko credits development of her photographic style with the influences of a Black and White photography course and an in-depth art history course, both completed during her first year at John Herron Art School, where she slept days and “obsessively worked on prints” each night in the computer lab or in the school darkroom.

The following year, Ventiko began working as an apprentice for her Maestro, photographer Tony Clevenger.  Ventiko describes her apprenticeship with Clevenger as “a lucky period in my life. Maestro taught me how to be an assistant, but more importantly he taught and encouraged me to become a photographer. Loading Polaroid backs,120 and 220 rolls, 4×5 sheet film, and running an E6 processor were daily occurrences. As was sweeping the floors. The greatest gift I was given was trust, because he taught me how to use the Dynalite strobe lighting system and a film Hasselblad camera and then gave me these tools to take home and experiment with.”

It was during this Dynalite strobe period that Ventiko began constructing sets for her portrait subjects to occupy, incorporating everyday found objects, clothing and drapery.

“After mastering the Dynas, Maestro taught me how to use Broncolors, and a year and a half ago I purchased some of my own. When I moved to New York, settling in the Bushwick section of Brooklyn, my images darkened–both visually and metaphorically.” 

One of Ventiko’s dark images, The Nightmare, which won an award on the art news site ArtSlant, can be viewed in a portfolio of her artwork on her website www.ventiko.com

“The Nightmare investigates relationships depicted in Christian art from the Gothic to Baroque epochs. It is not based specifically on any one work, dream or nightmare. I hope the image is beautiful so that the viewer is disarmed and open to the meaning of the work,” Ventiko stated.

Another of Ventiko’s images, Gyspy, depicts her muse, which Ventiko described meeting.  “My oldest friend Jaybird and I dressed up and went to see Armen Ra perform on his Theremin at the Gershwin Hotel. Fifteen minutes into the performance, from my peripheral, I saw light enter the back of the room and as the doors opened a figure in black ascended the stairs. One of the only seats open was on the second row from the front on the aisle next to me, where she took her seat–a tall brunette wearing a short black dress, black veil and black leather opera length gloves, oh my. So not to be rude, I didn’t acknowledge her presence. Fine, I was nervous. After Armen Ra finished his piece, he left the accompanying stereo playing and walked out of the room. After the silence became uncomfortably awkward, I turned to Gypsy and said “hmmm…is that it? It’s a bit unfinished don’t you think?” To which she replied “Well, no, that is what makes it wonderful, leaving an element of curiosity. (Perhaps I ought to tell you that Gypsy lives her days in the body of a man and at night she comes out to inspire me.) We continued the conversation in the lobby. Thank heavens Jaybird was there to give me the courage to ask Gypsy if she would allow me to photograph her. She said she would and we exchanged information.”

Their meeting led to an outing to Jamaica, Queens, were Ventiko and Gypsy found a sparkly red taffeta ball gown for their upcoming shoot. “The red ball gown was the first article of clothing that we purchased together. Seeing Gypsy try the dress on moved me deeply, as she was wearing her daily costume of a man.”  Ventiko began to question “what is right, what is wrong, who says so, and why something is accepted as truth. For the first time in my life I related on a personal level with someone’s struggle with identity and the shame and guilt brought on by others, and that coincided with my self-acceptance and self-expression.”

Ventiko kept the gown on displayed in her studio. One day, leaving the studio, walking outside in her trash filled neighborhood, “some discarded newspaper took to the air via a gust of wind. That was my Eureka moment. It was then that everything made sense. I wanted to both clean up the trash in the streets, and create something beautiful and representational of my life.” Thus began Ventiko’s late 2008, mid 2009 newspaper project and the creation of the first newspaper costumes.

“The newspaper project started small. I was collecting newspapers from the neighborhood bodegas’ trash piles (The New York Post or The Daily News) and keeping only the black and white pages. To maximize the amount of black and white pages, I started collecting The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal from the city’s

bodegas late at night and schlepping them back on the train.  These newspapers represent the values of the Machine and by manipulating each page of black and white print I visually exercise my Civil Disobedience against the accepted societal norms. After I had accumulated copious amounts of newspaper, it then took me three days–twisting and manipulating the” norm” into something that is desirable– to create the paper skirt for the photograph A Display.”

In Ventiko’s loft, the newspapers she had collected became an organic sculpture that she lived with, and in, for 9 months. “During that time the newspaper set continued to reshape itself into a variety of forms–it was a dragon tail that became a centipede that took over the hallway, until finally cremated in a 20 ft trench in Montauk.”

Another photo set Ventiko built in her studio, came about when “a friend of mine tipped me off that a woman emptying a storage unit in Long Island was giving away props and costumes for one day only.  I rented a car and dashed out there and was rewarded with 4 parachutes, army netting, bags and two red velvet deco style chairs.”

Ventiko then located some free sand (hauling not included) and built a set in her studio using  two of the parachutes suspended from the ceiling along with the army netting, and created a ten by ten foot sand pit. “The set became a fixture of my life for several shoots during a three week period. When it was time to strike the set, my two cats were quite disappointed, as they hadn’t needed to use their litter box in quite some time. Perhaps you might be interested in the story of the octopus I got down the street for the photograph Julia? Let’s just say the result was a great holiday card and very nasty infection…for me.”

Ventiko is currently creating new work in two very different series. “In the fall of 2010 my mother began chemotherapy and eventually had a mastectomy to treat her breast cancer.  This awakened in me many emotions that had been suppressed. The photographic works I am currently creating are a continuation of themes and motifs introduced in Tenebrism– birth, death, rebirth, loss, suffering, pain, remorse, shame, humility, guilt, fear etc.  Recently I created Le Mort inspired by Le Mort de Marat by Jacques Louis David.”

In her second series, Ventiko creates wearable costumes out of recycled milk cartons from a nearby elementary school. ”The costumes have been used for both performances and photo shoots. Currently I have two full body dresses/robes, halos, collars and panties made from milk cartons and am constantly creating more. I must create something with my hands or I feel unfulfilled and restless,” Ventiko explained. “Each day I must do something related to photography.  That can be shooting, editing, research, visiting museums, galleries and art fairs, processing information gathered, or creating sets.” When a portrait subject steps into Ventiko’s studio, they enter her version of reality. This reality is most often accompanied by the classical music of Erik Satie, costumes, wigs and assuming a character. “The set, people, props, costumes, make up, and posing are created, chosen, decided upon, applied and directed by me. In the final stage, I create a work of art by using my camera, as if I were a painter, to capture the composition I have created from the vision in my mind. The final image is a portrait of the essence of the individual free of constraint.”

 

Brooklyn: Animamus Salon

Animamus

hosted by Party Xpo

February 27, 2011, 7PM      UPDATE: change of venue, for details contact:  animamusartssalon@gmail.com

929 Broadway

Brooklyn, NY 11206

(347) 221-1172 ‎

http://partyxpobrooklyn.com/

Press Release

Animamus is pleased to announce its inaugural salon to be held on February 27,  2011 at 7:00 PM at:

Party Xpo

929 Broadway

Brooklyn, NY 11206

Animamus’ mission is to create a safe, supportive, and inspiring environment for artists of all mediums to debut and discuss their current work while encouraging audience participation.  Drawing its inspiration from the salon format first popularized in 17th Century France, where aristocrats invited thinkers, artists, and writers to their homes to discuss ideas, Bushwick Artist Salon seeks, in this digital age, to create a physical meeting space that will serve to foster the exchange of ideas, facilitate discourse, and create a sense of community. Salons will be held monthly.  Although each salon will be curated, anyone interested in participating in future salons can propose a presentation/ performance by emailing animamusartsalon@gmail.com.

At this date, the following are slated to present work with more presenters to be added:

Ventiko is a photographic artist whose work involves staged scenes created from found objects.  She will be creating a living installation utilizing empty milk cartons. http://www.ventiko.com

Sylva Dean and Me is a performance artist http://www.brianquinn.net/SYLVADEAN

Kristen Studioso is a video and stop motion artist. She will be screening new work. http://www.kristenstudioso.com

Coral Silverman is a visual artist and sometimes writer.   Her work reflects upon the ways in which new forms of technology are changing our relationship to nature, each other, and ourselves.  She will be presenting prose and paintings. www.coralsilverman.com

Everett Kane is a digital media teacher and artist who has been drawing 6 hours a day, seven days a week for six years.  He posts new drawings on Facebook daily.  He will be documenting the event through live drawing.

Fabio Corredor is a  performance artist/instigator.  He will be facilitating party games.

A canvas will be hung and the audience invited to freely mark and paint it between presentations.  This work will serve to document the creative energy created by the environment and by the various attendees.  No work shall be done on the painting outside of the Salon times.  The canvas will be a recurring fixture at each salon.

For images or additional information, please contact Coral Silverman at animamusartsalon@gmail.com.