Arts Incubator: New Media + Digital Artists Public Art Project w/Grants to Travel to Asia

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ZERO1 is calling innovative new media and digital artists with a love of travel and passion for community-driven art to apply to participate in the second round of the American Arts IncubatorAmerican Arts Incubator is an international arts exchange program developed in partnership with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA). The program sends artists abroad to collaborate with youth and underserved populations on community-based new media projects that bolster local economies, address a local social issue, and further social innovation. Artists will be working directly with ZERO1, U.S. embassy officials, and overseas partners to realize a series of public art projects that cultivate individual and community engagement and citizenship internationally. While the first round of artists are in the midst of their exchanges, American Arts Incubator will start looking forward to the next round of artist applicants.Participating overseas locations for the second round are: China, Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam. One artist will be selected for each location and will be responsible for creating a public art project plus overseeing a unique “small grants” program to facilitate community-driven art in that location. The deadline to apply May 31, 2015 by 11:59pm PST.

Learn more about criteria and application requirements here > >

Recent:  American Arts Incubator workshop held at the Negros Museum in the Philippines. Artist Kendal Henry debuted his Arts Incubator public art project in Papua New Guinea.

American Arts Incubator artist Felipe Castelblanco is currently in the Philippines, where he is working with artists in the Bacolod community to create a series of art projects focused on environmental health. He just finished leading a weeklong workshop, where participants shared their environmental concerns through stop-motion animations, and then designed 3D scaled models of a fictive city to propose sustainable urban planning. Next up, he will be building The People’s Island, a floating platform for collaborative performances and sculptural artworks that explores the bond of this community to the surrounding ocean.You can follow his project and read more about the four projects that were just selected to receive “small grant” awards here. In honor of Earth Day, Felipe is leading a video screening of artistic projects that explore the oceanic life and the environment in unusual ways, which will be followed by a test launch of the floating platform.Learn more about Felipe’s exchange and all current American Arts Incubator artists at americanartsincubator.org 

 

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Sunbelt American Made Artist Canvas vs Asian-made Discount Canvases + the Winner of Our Canvas Give-away!

Sunbelt Canvases with packaging

Yesterday UPS delivered a box from Sunbelt containing two sample 12 x 16 inch canvases.  What I noticed right away was the weightiness of each canvas — the substantial good quality canvas stretched over wide wood stretcher bars, with consistent super tight flat corner folds. Consistent corners are always something I look for.  I noted the labels (pictured above) listing the materials—cotton canvas, acrylic titanium white primer, precision squared.

I  removed the clear plastic wrap on the canvases and examined the white primer coats. I noted right away that the tooth of the canvas was visible and present and the finish matte. This is important!

Do you use Asian-made discount canvases? Check the corners, the wood frames, and the labels on Asian discount canvases before you buy. Is the primer matte or glossy and slick. Usually  labels do not mention materials used. Why is this important?

Did you know that lots of artists have had issues with the primer coating on those super discount canvases made in Asia (Vietnam, China, etc)?  In fact, many artists who use an Asian discount canvas will first take the canvas outdoors, spray it down with a garden hose to give it a good soak and then give the canvas surface a good scrub with a hard bristle brush to remove the primer!  The extra labor off scrubbing off the primer and the mess and extra expense of applying a coat of gesso makes that bargain canvas much less of a bargain. Why scrub off the primer? Because acrylic paint doesn’t stick to the primer on some discount Asian canvases! There have even been reports of entire paintings peeling right off of Asian-made discount canvases!

If you are an artist in the US it makes sense to buy American made canvases such as stretched canvas sold my Sunbelt—the canvas is consistent high quality,  the corners tightly wrapped, the coat of white primer is a titanium white acrylic with a matte finish, as it should be, and the wood stretcher bars wide to prevent warping.

Many artists have noticed the low retail price list on the Sunbelt site and made them their source of supply for canvases, wood panels and silkscreens.

Thanks to all who tweeted and sent our promotional canvas give-away blog post to Facebook!

 Winner of our Canvas Give-Away

Seven artists left comments on our blog post making them eligible to win. We assigned each artist a number 1-7 then put the numbers 1-7 into a hat, and then (without looking) drew out a number. The winner # 1  Brenda O.  We’ve given Brenda O’s mailing address to the people at Sunbelt canvas so they can ship the 16 x 20 inch gallery wrap canvas to her.

New Blog Post: 50% Off on Fine Print Imaging

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